Feb 18

Tombstone Tuesday–George Geisler

George Geisler, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Van Wert County, Ohio. (2012 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of George Geisler, located in row 3 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm, Van Wert County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

George Geisler
1864-1943

“George” Johann Conrad Geisler was born in Willshire Township on 6 June 1864, the son of Johann “Nicholas” and Elisabeth (Stemling) Geisler. He was baptized 12 June 1864, with George Geisler and Conrad Baals as his sponsors. Both of his parents were German immigrants.  

The Nicholas Geisler family in 1870, living on a farm in Willshire Township: Nicholas, 38; Elisabeth, 41; George, 6; and John 4. Some of their neighbors included E. Zimmerman, George Steeger, and Michael Greib. [1] A daughter, Anna, was born into the family in the fall of 1870.

The Nicholas Geisler household in 1880: Nicholas, 49; Elisabeth, 50; George, 16; John, 13; and Anna J, 9. [2]

Twenty years later, the Nicholas Geisler family in 1900, Willshire Township: Nicholas, 66; Elisabeth, 72; George, 34; John, 32; and Anna, 30. This enumeration indicates that Nicholas and Elisabeth had been married 38 years and that Elisabeth had given birth to 3 children, all of whom were still living. Nicholas was a farmer and their 3 children were not married. Nicholas immigrated in 1849 and Elisabeth in 1853. [3]   

The mother Elisabeth Geisler died May 12, 1905. [4]

The Nicholas Geisler household in 1910: Nicholas, 77; George, 46; John, 43; and Anna, 41. The two sons were farming the family farm by this time. [5]

The father Nicholas Geisler died in 1912 [6] and George and his sister Anna resided in the family home in 1920. [7]

George’s sister Anne Geisler died in 1934.

George Geisler died at the Van Wert County Hospital on 3 November 1943, at the age of 79 years, 4 months, and 27 days. He was buried on the 5th.  He never married.

Nicholas and Elisabeth Geisler had the following children, according to Zion Schumm’s records:

George Johann Conrad (1864-1943)
Johann George Conrad (1866-1916)
Christoph (1869-1869)
Anna Johanna (1870-1934)

[1] 1870 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert Ohio, p.436B, dwelling 97, family 98, Nicholas Geisler; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/7163/ : viewed 17 Feb 2020).

[2] 1880 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 154, p.446C, family 56, N. Gaesler; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/6742/ : viewed 17 Feb 2020).

[3] 1900 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED98, dwelling 198, family 203, Nicklos Giessler;  (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/7602/ : viewed 17 Feb 2020).

[4] “Ohio, County Death Records, 1840-2001,” Willshire Township, Van Wert, Deaths, Vol. 3, p.85, Elizabeth Giessler, 12 May 1905; (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F6L3-N97 : viewed 17 Feb 2020).

[5] 1910 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 114, p.3B, dwelling & family 65, Nicholas Geisler; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/7884/ : viewed 17 Feb 2020).

[6] “Ohio, County Death Records, 1840-2001,” Willshire Township, Van Wert, Nicholas Geissler, 15 Feb 1912; (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89ZY-T21G?i=88&cc=2128172&personaUrl=%2Fark%3A%2F61903%2F1%3A1%3AF6CF-L2Y : viewed 17 Feb 2020).

[7] 1920 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 146, p.6B, dwelling 128, family 129, George Geisler;  digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/6061/ : viewed 17 Feb 2020).

Feb 14

Nimrod Headington Journal, 1852, part 4

Today, the fourth in a series of blog posts, the transcription the 1852 journal of Nimrod Headington, my fourth great-granduncle. [1]

Nimrod Headington (1827-1913), at the age of 24, set sail from New York in February 1852, bound for San Francisco, California, to join the gold rush and to hopefully make his fortune. The Panama Canal had not been built at that time and he sailed around the tip of South America to reach the California coast.     

Nimrod Headington kept a diary of his 1852 journey and in 1905 made a hand-written copy for his daughter Thetis O. Tate. This hand-written copy was eventually passed down to Nimrod’s great-great-granddaughter, Karen (Liffring) Hill (1955-2010), who was a book editor. During the last two years of her life she transcribed Nimrod’s journal, which documents his travels between February of 1852 and spring of 1853.

Today’s installment of Nimrod Headington’s 1852 journal, “Trip to California.” Nimrod’s diary continues with his time in Brazil, about 40 days after sailing from New York:

Rio de Janeiro, BRAZIL [continued]

Sunday in Rio de Janeiro is a day of sporting, horse racing, bull fighting, etc. I went ashore with some others with the intention of going to church, but instead of seeing people going to church, then we saw all kinds of business going on. Loading and unloading ships, cart men hurrying to and from ships, and hundreds of Negroes carrying sacks of coffee on their heads from the wharf onto the ships, and all on a run.

The stores and saloons were all open. Some saloons filled with native Portuguese and some crowded with Negroes. The inhabitants of this city are a badly mixed race of people: Two-thirds of the city are Guinea Negroes black as black can be, and their dress consists of nothing more than a breech clout, no hat, no shoes. Their hide looks like the hide of an elephant. We saw one of those poor creatures cruelly whipped on one of the piers that extended out into the bay by his master, who took him by the back of the neck and his breech clout and jammed his head on the plank and stomped with his feet. Then let him up and went at him again with a piece of sugar cane about two inches thick and five feet long and split the cane into a thousand pieces over the poor fellow’s head. The Negro got up and walked away muttering something in the Portuguese language that we could not understand. I tell you it made my blood boil, but we dare not interfere, as we were in a foreign land and among strangers.

The manner of feeding those poor slaves is hardly as good as we feed hogs. We were watching the loading and unloading of a ship at the same time. The ship was loaded with shelled corn in sacks from New York and was loading to return with coffee, and the Negroes would go up one gangplank with a sack of coffee on their heads and come down another plank with a sack of shelled corn, thus loading and unloading all at the same time.

It was about the noon hour, and we wanted to see them fed presently. Four Negroes came with large buckets on their heads and sat them down on the wharf, and the working men began to gather around and stick their dirty hands into the buckets and began to eat of the horrible-looking stuff. We could not tell what it was, but it looked like wheat bran and beans about half-cooked. They ate it like it was good, but I could not think it was very palatable. Then the manner in which it was prepared and served was horrible.

The principal coin used here is a large copper coin call a Dump, worth 2-1/2 cents. The silver coin—a milreis, worth about 56 cents. These two coins do nearly all the business of the city and is the money of the realm.

I went to see the market. It was a great sight. All kinds of fruits and vegetables, such as green beans, peas, cabbage, turnips, potatoes and green corn, fowls and fishes and shrimps and all kinds of animals for sale. I saw a great many curious things, but of all that I saw to excite my curiosity, most was an old woman sitting by the wayside that had claws instead of hands and ears like a hound.

But I must now relate what happened at the office of the American consul. The captain and Mr. Abott met at the appointed hour, and after hearing what each party had to say, the consul said that another ship must be chartered and forty of our passengers should be taken off. The captain being short of funds immediately advertised for a loan of eighteen thousand milreis to pay the expense of another vessel.

The old ship Prince de Johnville was in the port undergoing repairs, and the captain made arrangements with her to carry 40 of our passengers to San Francisco. He had to pay $200 for each passenger. We left one man in the hospital. Our head steward and wife and one sailor left us, and our head cook. We remained eight days in this port, and on the morning of the 5th of April, we weighed anchor and attempted to sail out of this port, but the captain did not understand the rule of the port. We did not get out that day. This rule is that vessels leaving must obtain from the fort next to the city a
password and that password must be given at the outer fort to show that all is right, and if they have not the password, they cannot go out.

When we got opposite the last fort, the hailed us for the password. The captain did not know what they wanted and kept on. Then a blank shot was fired from the fort, and in half a minute, a shot was fired through our rigging. The anchor was dropped in quick time, and the captain lowered a life boat and went to the fort to see what was wanted. He was then informed what was required, and with four sailors to row his life boat, he went back to the first fort to get his password, and by the time he returned, the tide was setting in, and we had to hoist anchor and float back into the harbor. The next day, we attempted to run out again, but the tide set in too soon, and we could not get out. The next day, tried it again but with the same success, only we came very near running on the rocks. The office of the American consul is in plain sight of the entrance to this harbor, and with the aid of his glass could see all that was happening to us. So he sent orders to our captain not to weigh anchor again until he got a steamer to tow us out of the harbor. Only a few rods from us, we saw a Brigg run afoul of a ledge of rocks that knocked a hole in her bottom, and she sank in five minutes. A captain and two sailors were lost.

April 9th. On Friday, April the 9th early in the morning, we were towed out in fine style and soon had a fine breeze and by night out of sight of Rio de Janeiro and the main land. [2]

To be continued…

I will post Nimrod’s journal in increments, but not necessarily every week.

Nimrod Headington (1827-1913)

[1] Nimrod Headington, the son of Nicholas (1790-1856) and Ruth (Phillips) (1794-1865) Headington, was born in Mt. Vernon, Knox County, Ohio, on 5 August 1827. He married Mary Ann McDonald (1829-1855) in Delaware County, Ohio, in 1849 and they had a son a year later. Nimrod moved to Portland, Jay County, Indiana, by 1860 and a couple years later served in the 34th Indiana Infantry during the Civil War as a Colonel, Lieutenant Colonel, and Major. Nimrod died 7 January 1913 and is buried in Green Park Cemetery, Portland. Nimrod Headington is my fourth great-granduncle, the brother of my fourth great-grandfather, William Headington (1815-1879).

[2] Nimrod Headington’s journal, transcription and photos courtesy of Ross Hill, 2019, used with permission.

 

Feb 11

Tombstone Tuesday–Elisabeth Krieb

Elisabeth Krieb, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Van Wert County, Ohio. (2012 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Elisabeth Krieb, located in row 5 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm, Van Wert County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

ELISABETH KRIEB
1867-1938
John 5:21

Krieb is a different spelling for this surname and is the spelling on her death certificate as well. In the church and local records the usual spelling is Grieb. Her brother and parents, who are also buried in Zion Schumm’s cemetery, have the Grieb spelling on their tombstones. It is not surprising that the various census records have several unusual spelling variations of the Grieb surname. In this post I will use both spellings, Grieb and Krieb, as used in the various records.  

Margarethe “Elisabeth” Krieb [spelled Grieb in Zion Schumm’s records and in her Van Wert County Probate birth record] was born in Willshire Township, Van Wert County, Ohio, on 14 December 1867, the daughter of Michael and Barbara (Geisler) Grieb. [1] She was baptized at Zion Schumm on 12 January 1868, with Michael Geisler and Margarethe VanWald serving as her sponsors. Her parents were both German immigrants. Elisabeth had a brother John, born in 1869.

The Michael Grieb family in census enumerations: 1870: Michael, 50; Barbara, 30; Elisabeth, 2; and John, 11 months. [2] 1880: Michael, 60; Barbara, 40; Margaret E, 13; and John E, 10. [3] 1900: Michael, 86, Maggie, wife, age unknown; Lizzie, 32; and John, 30. The couple had been married 32 years and she had given birth to 2 children, both of whom were living. [4] 

Elisabeth’s father Michael Grieb died 11 February 1903, at the age of 84.

In 1910 and 1920 widow Barbara Grieb lived with her two single children, John and Elisabeth, near Willshire. In 1910: John, 41; Barbara, 70; and Elisabeth, 22. [5] The Grieb household in 1920: John, 50; Barbara, 82; and Lizzie, 51. [6]

Barbara (Geisler) Grieb died on 14 March 1929. [7] She and her husband Michael are buried in row 8 of Zion Schumm’s cemetery. 

John and his sister Elizabeth remained in the family’s home after their mother’s death and were enumerated in the 1930 census: John, 58; and Elizabeth “Lizzie”, 61. John’s occupation was farmer. No occupation is given for his sister Elizabeth. [8]

Elisabeth Krieb died of breast cancer in Van Wert County on 28 April 1938, at the age of 70 years, 4 months, and 14 days, according to Zion Schumm’s records. Elisabeth never married and is shown as spinster on her death certificate. Her name is spelled Krieb on her death certificate. She was buried on the 30th. [9]

Her brother John Grieb died 12 May 1951. John is buried in row 3 of Zion’s cemetery.

[1] “Ohio, County Births, 1841-2003,” Van Wert, Vol 1:4, __ Grieb, 14 Dec 1867;  (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9RKX-9CSF?i=50&cc=1932106&personaUrl=%2Fark%3A%2F61903%2F1%3A1%3AVR9G-K5V : viewed 11 Jan 2020).

[2] 1870 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, p.436B, dwelling 104, family 105, Michael Croep; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/7163/ : viewed 10 Jan 2020).  

[3] 1880 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 154, p.449B, family 119, Michael Greup; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com, (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/6742/ : viewed 11 Jan 2020).

[4] 1900 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 98, p.10, dwelling 181, family 186, Michael Greeb; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/7602/ : viewed 11 Jan 2020). [note: Barbara’s name may have been Margarethe Barbara and she may have been called Maggie in this census. The christening name of their daughter “Elisabeth” was Margarethe Elisabeth.]

[5] 1910 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 114, p.3B, dwelling & family 60, John Grieb; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/7884/ : viewed 11 Jan 2020).

[6] 1920 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 146, p.4B, dwelling 88, family 89, John Grey; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/6061/ : viewed 11 Jan 2020).

[7] “Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953,” Van Wert County, Barbara Greb, 14 Mar 1929; database with images, FamilySearch.org  (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-95WJ-9K52?i=2794&cc=1307272&personaUrl=%2Fark%3A%2F61903%2F1%3A1%3AX8PV-CNM : viewed 11 Jan 2020).

[8] 1930 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 24, p.5B, dwelling 113, family 116, John Krieb; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/6224/ : viewed 11 Jan 2020).

[9] “Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953,” Van Wert County, Elizabeth Margaret Krieb, 28 Apr 1938; database with images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9574-9WW3?i=2663&cc=1307272&personaUrl=%2Fark%3A%2F61903%2F1%3A1%3AXZ82-PJW : viewed 9 Feb 2020).

Feb 07

Nimrod Headington Journal, 1852, part 3

Today, the third in a series of blog posts, the transcription the 1852 journal of Nimrod Headington, my fourth great-granduncle. [1]

Nimrod Headington (1827-1913), at the age of 24, set sail from New York in February 1852, bound for San Francisco, California, to join the gold rush and to hopefully make his fortune. The Panama Canal had not been built at that time and he sailed around the tip of South America to reach the California coast.

Nimrod Headington Journal, 1852, p.1

Nimrod Headington kept a diary of his travels and in 1905 he made a hand-written copy of his 1852 journal for his daughter Thetis O. Tate. This hand-written copy was eventually passed down to Nimrod’s great-great-granddaughter, Karen (Liffring) Hill (1955-2010), who was a book editor. During the last two years of her life she transcribed Nimrod’s journal, which documents his travels between February of 1852 and spring of 1853.

Today, the third installment of Nimrod Headington’s 1852 journal, “Trip to California.” Nimrod’s diary continues in Brazil, 39 days after sailing from New York:

BRAZIL

Thursday fine weather and good sailing in latitude 20°14’. We came in sight of the Brazilian Mountains. We amused ourselves by looking at them all day, as we had not seen land for 30 days.

These mountains are very high and can be seen a great distance from off the sea. The mountains are covered with low bushy trees. Thousands of wild cattle can be seen feeding in the mountains, by the aid of the spyglass, and all kinds of wild animals.

March 24. We came in sight of Rio, and the light at Rio de Janeiro. The wind grew so strong that we had to tack ship and stand out to sea because we could not reach the port before dark. No vessels are allowed to enter or depart from this port after the sun goes down.

The next morning it was almost a calm, but we headed for port. At four o’clock we passed the first Fort. They hailed us from the fort, saying, “Where are you from and how many days out?” Our captain answered, “From New York, 39 days out.” In five minutes one of the custom house officers was on board of our ship, and he ordered the captain to let go anchor or the second fort would fire into us. The captain paid no attention to the officer, and when we got opposite the second fort, they cried out, “Cast your anchor immediately!” The anchor was let loose. If it had not been done, they would have fired into our ship and perhaps sunk us, as the custom of this port is to allow no foreign vessel to pass the second fort without a special permit from the first fort and from the custom house office.

A guard boat is stationed halfway between the fort and the city to prevent passengers from landing or smuggling anything to or from our ship. The custom house officer examined the ship’s papers and inquired about the health of the passengers and crew and whether we had any sickness on board since we left the port at New York and if any had died. As we had only had one death and all was well, he left us well satisfied for us to land. But previous to our landing at this port, we had prepared a petition to the

American consul at this place, asking him to aid us in chartering another vessel to take part of our passengers, as we were suffering for want of room and ventilation.

As soon as the anchor was dropped, the captain gave orders that none of us should go ashore until the next morning. He thought to visit the consul first and arrange things to suit himself, but we beat his game easy, for we had some long heads in our crowd. About the time the sun set in the west and the shades of night set in, a small boat manned by two Portuguese came along the side of our ship, and without the knowledge of our captain, we lowered a man by the name of Abott from the state of Maine down into the boat by the aid of a rope and told the men to take him ashore as fast as possible. He was soon on shore and at the office of the consul armed with our petition setting forth our grievances. It being late Saturday evening, the consul told Mr. Abott to come to his office on Monday morning at ten o’clock, and at the same time he wrote a note for Mr. Abott to hand to our captain, and as the note was not sealed, he read it was a notice to the captain to appear at the same hour.

The next morning, Sunday, the captain was preparing to go on shore with his [lady] when Mr. Abott stepped up to him and handed him the note from the consul. Oh, but he was surprised! He asked Abott where he got the note and was told “at the office of the American consul.” He asked Abott if he had not seen his order that no one should go on shore until Sunday morning. Abott answered, saying, “Captain your ship is not laden with cattle, but with free-born American citizens, who have some rights that you are bound to respect.” [2]  

To be continued, with more from Brazil…

Nimrod Headington (1827-1913)

I will post Nimrod’s journal in increments, but not necessarily every week.

[1] Nimrod Headington, the son of Nicholas (1790-1856) and Ruth (Phillips) (1794-1865) Headington, was born in Mt. Vernon, Knox County, Ohio, on 5 August 1827. He married Mary Ann McDonald (1829-1855) in Delaware County, Ohio, in 1849 and they had a son a year later. Nimrod moved to Portland, Jay County, Indiana, by 1860. He served in the 34th Indiana Infantry during the Civil War as a Colonel, Lieutenant Colonel, and Major. Nimrod died 7 January 1913 and is buried in Green Park Cemetery, Portland. Nimrod Headington is my fourth great-granduncle, the brother of my fourth great-grandfather, William Headington (1815-1879).

[2] Nimrod Headington’s journal, transcription and photos courtesy of Ross Hill, 2019, used with permission.

Feb 04

Tombstone Tuesday–Michael J & Barbara (Geisler) Grieb

Michael J & Barbara (Geisler) Grieb, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Van Wert County, Ohio. (2012 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Michael J and Barbara (Geisler) Grieb, located in row 8 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm, Van Wert County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

GRIEB
Michael J
Grieb
Geboren
Den 26 Jan 1819
Gestorben
Den 11 Feb 1903

Barbara
Grieb
Geboren
1839
Gestorben
Mar. 14, 1929

Grieb, Michael J Grieb, born 26 Jan 1819, died 11 Feb 1903; Barbara Grieb, born 1839, died 14 Mar 1929.

Michael Johann Grieb was born 26 January 1819 in Gerabronn, Wuertemberg, according to Zion Schumm’s records. Michael’s wife Barbara Geisler was born in Germany in 1839, according to her tombstone, but on her death certificate, her date of birth is unknown and her age is about 90. [1] Her death is not recorded in Zion Schumm’s records at all. I do not know the names of the parents of either but Barbara Geisler may have had siblings living in the area.

Michael immigrated in 1852 and his wife Barbara immigrated in 1849. [2] 

This may be Michael Grieb in the 1860 census, Willshire Township, Van Wert County: Michael, age 40, born in Wuerttemberg, real estate value $500, indexed as Michael Creep on Ancestry.com. [3]

Michael Greib married Barbara Geisler on 9 January 1867 at Zion Lutheran, Schumm, according to the church records and Van Wert County Marriages. In the church record his name is shown as George Michael.

Michael and Barbara had two children after their marriage, Elizabeth, born in 1867, and John, born in 1869.

The Michael Grieb family in 1870: Michael, 50; Barbara, 30; Elizabeth, 2; and John, 11 months. This enumeration also indicates that both parents were born in Germany. [4]

The Michael Grieb household in 1880: Michael, 60; Barbara, 40; Margaret E, 13; and John E, 10. [5] 

The 1900 census gives more information. The Michael Grieb family in 1900: Michael, 86, Maggie, wife, age unknown; Lizzie, 32; and John, 30. The couple had been married 32 years and she had given birth to 2 children, both of whom were living. Michael’s wife is shown as Maggie in this enumeration and the person being interviewed does not know her date of birth or her age. I assume this was his wife Barbara. They were both born in Germany, Michael immigrating in 1852 and Maggie [Barbara?] in 1849. [2] 

Michael Grieb died of a bladder infection on 11 February 1903. He was 84 years and 25 days old and was buried on the 13th, according to the church records.

In 1910 and 1920 widow Barbara Grieb lived with her two single children, John and Elizabeth, near Willshire. In 1910: John, 41; Barbara, 70; and Elizabeth, 22. This enumeration indicates that Barbara immigrated in 1850. [6] The Grieb household in 1920: John, 50; Barbara, 82; and Lizzie, 51. [7] John’s occupation was farmer.

Barbara (Geisler) Grieb died in Willshire Township, Van Wert County, from a cerebral hemorrhage, on 14 March 1929. She was buried on the 17th. [1]

John and his sister Elizabeth remained in the family’s home after their mother’s death. [8] 

Daughter Elisabeth Grieb died 28 April 1938 and son John Grieb died 12 May 1951. John is buried in Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm.

[1] “Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953,” Van Wert County, Barbara Greb, 14 Mar 1929; database with images, FamilySearch.org  (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-95WJ-9K52?i=2794&cc=1307272&personaUrl=%2Fark%3A%2F61903%2F1%3A1%3AX8PV-CNM : viewed 11 Jan 2020).

[2] 1900 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 98, p.10, dwelling 181, family 186, Michael Greeb; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/7602/ : viewed 11 Jan 2020). [note: Barbara’s name may have been Margarethe Barbara and she may have been called Maggie in this census. The christening name of their daughter “Elizabeth” was Margarethe Elizabeth.]

[3] 1860 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, p.426, dwelling 1081, family 1075, Michael Creep; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/7667/ : viewed 3 Feb 2020).

[4] 1870 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, p.436B, dwelling 104, family 105, Michael Croep; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/7163/ : viewed 10 Jan 2020).  

[5] 1880 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 154, p.449B, family 119, Michael Greup; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com, (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/6742/ : viewed 11 Jan 2020).

[6] 1910 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 114, p.3B, dwelling & family 60, John Grieb; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/7884/ : viewed 11 Jan 2020).

[7] 1920 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 146, p.4B, dwelling 88, family 89, John Grey; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/6061/ : viewed 11 Jan 2020).

[8] 1930 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 24, p.5B, dwelling 113, family 116, John Krieb; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/6224/ : viewed 11 Jan 2020).

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