Oct 16

Tombstone Tuesday–Maria Seaman

Maria Seeman/Seaman, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm, Van Wert County, Ohio. (2012 9photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Maria Seaman, located in row 1 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm, Van Wert County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

Maria
Tochter von
Johannes
Und
Maria A[?]
Seeman
Gestorben
Den 12 April
1862
Alter 6 Yahre
4 Monate, 4 Tage

Maria, daughter of Johannes Seeman, died on 12 April 1862, aged 6 years, 4 months, and 4 days. [1]

According to Zion Schumm’s records, Maria Seaman was born 17 December 1855 to John and Anna Maria Seemann. She was baptized 19 April 1862, with George Steeger and his wife serving as her sponsors.

Maria was probably born in Ohio. According to Zion Schumm’s records, Maria’s sister Emma Seaman was born in Warren County, Ohio, in 1857, and, since both girls were baptized at Zion Schumm in 1862, they apparently moved to the Schumm area by that time. I have not located the family in 1860.

Zion Schumm records that Maria Seemann died of a throat infection and/or croup on 22 April 1862, at the age of 6 years, 4 months, and 5 days.

You probably noticed right away that the death date inscribed on Mari’s tombstone is incorrect. She would not have been baptized 7 days after her death. Instead, she was baptized 4 days before her death, on 19 April, according to the church records. Her death occurred on the 22nd, but her tombstone is inscribed as the 12th. She may have been very sick when she was baptized.

Another error on her tombstone is her age. As calculated from her tombstone, Maria would have been born 8 December 1855. Zion Schumm records her birth specifically as 17 December 1855 in both her baptism record and her death/burial record. Her death/burial record there indicates she was 6 years, 4 months, and 5 days old, which calculates 17 December 1855 as her date of birth. The age on her tombstone is off by 1 day.

Maria’s mother Anna Maria Seaman died 12 January 1894 and she is buried in Greenbrier Cemetery, Van Wert County. Maria’s father John Seaman died 29 May 1897 and is buried in row 7 of Zion Schumm’s cemetery.

 

[1] Zion Schumm’s records spell the name Seemann. The name is spelled Seeman on Maria’s tombstone. In today’s text, I am using the spelling Seaman, as is spelled on Maria’s father’s tombstone.

 

Oct 12

Dear Mom & All–WWII Letters from Herb (part 28)

Yes, I am still transcribing the letters my dad, Herbert Miller, wrote home while in the Army, stationed in Germany during WWII and the occupation period afterward. His family saved a lot, if not most of his letters and my goal is to transcribe them all. Posting them here is a good motivation for me to finish that project. And I am nearly finished!

Pfc Herbert M. Miller

These later letters do not tell a lot of information, just an interesting tidbit here and there, but I am sure the family was excited whenever they received a letter from him. By this time my dad had been in Europe for quite some time–16 months by May of 1946.

Today’s letters begin in February 1946. The war was over and my dad was serving in the Occupation Force in Germany, serving until he had enough time and points to be honorably discharged from the U.S. Army. He was stationed and working at an Army post office in Heidelberg, Germany. [1]

These letters were written to my dad’s sister Em, her husband Norval “Jack,” and their little son Ron.

17 Feb 1946
Heidelberg, Germany

Dear Em, Jack & Family,

It’s Sunday morning 11:30, just about time to go to chow. We eat over with the WACs today. One of them said we have steak, ought to be a pretty good dinner then.

They are closing up two of the theaters today and opening up a new one. The new one is in the auditorium of the American wing of the Heidelberg, just around the corner from the house we billet in.

I guess I’ll start farming as soon as I get home.

How are the automobiles selling now? Pretty high? I would like to buy a nice one but the demand will be so great for them I imagine, they will really be high.

How is the Plymouth holding up? Pretty good? I’ll be glad when I can be able to drive my own car again.

I guess about four or five months will do it and boy will I be glad to be out of the Army.

Do you still go to Celina on Saturday nights? Did mom get the movie projector I sent home? Or the watches and other things? How about all of the perfume. Did you get the two bottles? I think I sent mom 4 packed the same way. Maybe it was only 2.

I can’t think of any more to write so I’d better close for now.

Love,
Herbie

[I wonder about the Plymouth my dad mentions. He let one of his sisters drive it while he was overseas. I wonder if he let her keep it after the war and if he got a different car when he returned home. Maybe one of my uncles knows.]

Orientation Class, 84th Division, Germany, WWII.

Orientation Class, 84th Division, Germany, WWII.

23 Feb 1946
Heidelberg, Germany

Dear Em, Jack & Family,

It’s Saturday morning and since I’m not working today I decided to write a few letters.

How’s the boy coming along? I heard he is really growing. Does he know he has an uncle in the Army? That really makes me sound old, doesn’t it?

I guess I start farming as soon as I get home. Anyway, that’s the way it looks. I would sort of like to go to school or college but I know I wouldn’t or couldn’t get down and study like I would have to.

I imagine most of the guys are home and out of the Army aren’t’ they? All except me and a few other ones.

The last couple of days it has been pretty chilly. It will snow for about a half hour and the ground will be white and then the sun comes out and melts it. This is about the coldest weather we have had so far.

Guess I’d better close for now. Am feeling fine and hope you are the same.

Love,
Herbie

Shower time for the 333rd, 84th Div, Germany, WWII.

10 March 1946
Heidelberg, Germany

Dear Em, Jack & Family,

It’s Sunday afternoon and everything is dragging along. Even the time.

Just came back from chow and ate dinner with the WACs. They had potatoes, beef, carrots and cake, no ice cream.

I haven’t written many letters. Last week was petty busy. I wrote money orders about all week and then would have to go out again after supper and make the report. I still have two day’s money and stuff to turn in, about $15,000. A quite a bit of money.

How is everything on the farm coming along? And Chatt? I it still as quiet as it always was?

How’s the family coming along? OK I hope. I haven’t received any mail for about two weeks again. I hope it breaks and comes through better pretty soon.

[That was likely the first page of a two page letter, but it is the only page that survived.]

84th Div. Generals, WWII, Gen. Alexander Russell Bolling, in doorway, far right.

84th Division Commander, Gen. A.R. Bolling, WWII (right). Bolling was also the Commander of the 3rd Army 1952-1955.

[In the next letter my dad says that he often writes his letters while he is at the Red Cross. The letter was written on American Red Cross stationery.]

16 March 1946
Heidelberg, Germany

Dear Em, Jack, & Family,

It’s a nice quiet Saturday evening and I stayed in my room until 9:00 sewing on patches and then decided to come to the Red Cross. I feel more in the mood to write if I’m down here drinking coffee and having donuts.

I’ve got a half hour to finish this letter before the club closes. So I may have to cut the letter short.

The situation in Russia sounds worse all the time, doesn’t it?

The weather has never warmed up yet. It never did get real cold, but just cool enough to make it nasty out. It has been raining almost every day in Heidelberg. I guess that is natural, the way the people say. Especially in the spring.

Guess I’d better sign off for now. Am feeling fine and hope you are the same.

Love,
Herbie

[I will post transcriptions of the few remaining letters soon.]

 

[1] My dad, Herbert Miller, trained as a replacement troop during the fall of 1944, arrived in Europe in December of that same year, and was assigned to Company L, 333rd Regiment, 84th Infantry Division. The 84th was known as the Railsplitters. He fought in the Battle of the Bulge in Belgium and later in parts of Luxembourg, Germany, and France.

Oct 09

Tombstone Tuesday–John Seaman & Emma (Seaman) Kreiselmeyer

John Seaman & daughter Emma (Seaman) Kreiselmeyer, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm, Van Wert County, Ohio. (2012 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of John Seaman and his daughter Emma (Seaman) Kreiselmeyer, located in row 7 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm, Van Wert County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

John Seaman
Sep. 1, 1814
May 29, 1897
Emma Kreiselmeyer
Aug. 7, 1857
Apr. 3, 1896
SEAMAN

In last week’s Tombstone Tuesday I wrote about Emma’s husband John Kreiselmeyer, who died in 1887 and is buried in row 5 in Zion Schumm’s cemetery. It seems unusual that Emma and her father share a tombstone, making it look like, at first glance, that they were probably husband and wife. And that Emma’s maiden name was Kreiselmeyer. You might look at the stone and think he was old enough to be her father. Well, he was her father!

One might think that Emma would share a tombstone with her husband John Kreiselmeyer or have her own separate tombstone. Emma and her father John Seaman died about a year apart and that may have something to do with the it. Perhaps money was an issue. To make matters even more confusing, John’s wife, and Emma’s mother, Anna Maria Seaman, is buried at another cemetery.

Find a Grave.com indicates that Emma was John Seaman’s wife [1], but the records indicate that Emma was really the daughter of John and Anna Maria Seaman, and the wife of John Kreiselmeyer.

According to Zion Schumm’s records, Johann Seaman was born 1 September 1814 in Wuertemburg. John Seaman and Anna Maria married in Wuertemberg and had a son Jacob before immigrating to America. [Zion Schumm’s records spell this name as Seemann.]

According to Zion Schumm’s records, Emma Seaman was born 7 August 1857, the daughter of John and Anna Maria Seaman. Emma was baptized 27 April 1862, with Jakob Helle and his wife Maria Barbara serving as her sponsors.

I have been unable to locate the Seaman family in 1860. Zion Schumm’s records indicate that Emma was born in Warren County, Ohio, in 1857, so they probably moved to Schumm sometime before Emma’s baptism in 1862. Emma’s sister Maria was also baptized at Zion Schumm in April of 1862 and Maria is recorded as having died at Schumm in 1862. When they did settle in this area they lived near the Kreiselmeyers.

The Seaman household in 1870 in Willshire Township: John, 56; Mary, 51; Jacob, 23; and Emma, 13. The father John was a farmer and son Jacob was a carpenter. All were born in Wuerttemberg except Emma, who was born in Ohio. [2]

Emma Seaman married her neighbor John Kreiselmeyer sometime between 1870 and 1880, but I could not find a record of their marriage. The Kreiselmeyers and Seamans lived near each other and both families attended Zion Schumm, so I assumed John and Emma would have married at Zion Schumm, but evidently not. Their marriage is not recorded there.

In 1880 John and Emma [Seaman] Kreiselmeyer lived in Willshire Township with her parents John and Anna Maria Seaman. The John and Emma Kreiselmeyer household in 1880: John [Seaman], 65; Anna Maria [Seaman], 61, John [Kreiselmeyer], 28; Emma [Kreiselmeyer], 21; and Fredric Rattach, 21. They were farmers and Rattach was their farm laborer. Emma’s parents were born in Wuerttemberg and John and Emma were born in Ohio. [3]

Emma’s husband John Kreiselmeyer died 20 July 1887. He was 32 years old and is buried in row 5 of Zion Schumm Cemetery.

Emma may have lived with her parents after her husband John’s death. Her mother Anna Maria Seaman died 12 January 1894 and is buried in Greenbrier Cemetery, Van Wert County. Anna Maria was 75 years old, and her age agrees with the census records. Her tombstone indicates she was married to John Seaman. [4] Greenbrier Cemetery is north of Schumm. Why was she buried at Greenbrier and not Schumm? Perhaps she was not a member of Zion Schumm.

Anna Maria Seaman’s death is also recorded in Van Wert Probate: Anna M. Seaman, age 75 years and 12 days, died of lung fever on 12 January 1894. She was married, born in Germany and lived at Schumm, where she also died. [5]

Emma (Seaman) Kreiselmeyer died two years later. Zion Schumm’s death/burial records identify her very clearly: Emma Kreiselmeyer, born Seemann [Seaman], wife of Mr. Johann Kreiselmeyer, born 7 August 1857 in Warren County, Ohio, died of cancer on 4 April 1896, at the age of 38 years, 7 months, and 27 days. She was buried on 7 April. Her funeral text was 1 Cor.15: 55-57.

Emma’s death is also recorded in Van Wert County Probate: Emma Kreiselmeyer, widow, age 38 years, 7 months, and 27 days, died of cancer on 3 April 1896. Born in the U.S., her residence was Schumm, where she died. She was a housekeeper. [6] This record shows her death date one day earlier that the church records, but the date agrees with her tombstone.

According to Zion Schumm’s records, Emma’s father John Seaman died of dropsy on 29 May 1897, at the age of 82 years, 8 months, and 28 days.  He was buried on 31 May. His death is also recorded in Van Wert County Probate, which indicates that he was 83 years old, born in Germany, died of dropsy in Van Wert County, and was a farmer. [7]

It appears that John and Emma Kreiselmeyer did not have any children.

 

[1] Find a Grave, Emma Kreiselmeyer Seaman, memorial no. 34047025, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm, Van Wert County, Ohio.

[2] 1870 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, p.437 [stamped], dwelling 105, family 106, John Seaman; Ancestry.com  ( https://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?htx=List&dbid=7163&offerid=0%3a7858%3a0 : viewed 1 Oct 2018).

[3] 1880 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 154, p.449A [stamped], family 113, John Kreiselmyer; Ancestry.com (https://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?htx=List&dbid=6742&offerid=0%3a7858%3a0 : viewed 1 Oct 2018).

[4] Find a Grave, Anna M. Seaman, memorial no. 22579270, Greenbriar Cemetery, Glenmore, Van Wert County, Ohio.

[5] “Ohio County Death Records, 1840-2001,” database with images, FamilySearch ( https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-6722-8J?i=532&cc=2128172 : viewed 8 Oct 2018), Anna M. Seaman, 12 Jan 1894; Van Wert Co. Deaths, Vol. 2, p.191, no. 8; FHL microfilm 1015858.

[6] “Ohio County Death Records, 1840-2001,” database with images, FamilySearch ( https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-672V-GL?i=460&cc=2128172 : viewed 1 Oct 2018), Emma Kreiselmeyer, 3 Apr 1896; Van Wert Co. Deaths, Vol. 2, p.97, no. 11; FHL microfilm 1015858.

[7] “Ohio County Death Records, 1840-2001,” database with images, FamilySearch,
( https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-672L-S5?i=536&cc=2128172 : viewed 1 Oct 2018), John Seaman, 29 May 1897; Van Wert County Deaths, Vol. 2, p.195, no. 8; FHL microfilm 1015858.

 

Oct 05

1919–Bluffton Shuts Out Celina, 138-0

I appreciate it when Karen’s Chatt readers write me with interesting information and stories about people and events in our area of west central Ohio and neighboring Indiana. I want to thank Lynne for sending me the following newspaper transcription, which she transcribed from a framed 1935 Bluffton, Indiana, newspaper, The News-Banner. I find it to be a very interesting article about a 1919 basketball game that Bruno Betzel played in, playing for Celina’s Phi Delta Kappa team, a game where Celina was shutout 138-0. A world’s record basketball shutout, at least at one time.

I do not have a copy of this news article but I found a couple smaller pieces about the game on Newspapers.com  and I have put them at the end of this post.

I have written about Chattanooga, Ohio, native Albert “Bruno” Betzel, before. He was born in Chatt in 1894 and his family moved to Celina by 1910. As an adult he was a major league baseball player and manager. He and his wife May lived in Celina and he died in 1965.

Bruno, Betzel, The Morning Call, Allentown, PA, 16 Dec 1936, p.26; Newspapers.com.

I read somewhere that Bruno played basketball in the winter to keep in shape. And that is likely why he was playing for the Celina basketball team in 1919. The article was written in 1935 and recounts the 1919 game:

Bluffton Phi Delta Claim World’s Shutout Net Mark

Old Newspaper File Found to Verify Story About 138 to 0 Count Handed Celina Basketball Team Here in 1919–Bluffton 138; Celina, Ohio, 0.
That was the final score of a basketball game played in this city on the evening of Thursday, January 30, 1919, according to the files of the Evening Banner at the public library at this city [Bluffton, IN], and according to reports from the sports statisticians throughout the country regarding other shutout scores of record, the score turned in here still stands as the world’s record.

Verification of the score made in that game in 1919 came about through efforts of Mayor Franklin Buckner, who formerly played on the old Phi Delta Kappa team. He had heard members of the team speak of the game with Celina, O., but not until publication started of other scores reported to be world’s records, did he begin to consider it a matter of civic duty to investigate.

His desire to see Bluffton obtain credit in the matter led to his starting a search through the old newspaper files. He found that the Bluffton-Celina game was played on the night of Thursday, January 30, 1919, and was reported in the Evening Banner on January 31, 1919. The newspaper story is as follows:

A Freak Game
A freak game that will go down in basketball history of Bluffton along with one or two others of its kind was played Thursday evening between the Phi Delta Kappa team of this city and the Phi Deltas of Celina, Ohio. The score was 138 to 0 in Bluffton’s favor.

There was only one foul in the whole game.

Knowing that A. Betzel, forward on the Celina team was a shortstop on the St. Louis National baseball team and figuring that he was somewhat of an Everett Scott in athletics, Bluffton prepared for a hard game. The visiting team didn’t arrive here until late and then they put up a poor appearance with their baseball, football, and army uniforms.

Kyle got into the game for a few minutes after having been out two weeks on account of an injured arm. He caged five field goals. The summary:

Celina–A. Betzel and Hindus, forwards; W. Betzell, center; Garlach and Miller, guards.

Bluffton–Cummins, Bolton, and Kyle, forwards; Humbert, center; Moomaw, Shoemaker and Prough, guards.

Field goals–Cummins, 31; Bolton, 20; Humbert, 6; Moomaw, 2; Shoemaker, 2; Prough, 3; and Kyle, 5.

Reference Explained
Everett Scott is referred to in the story for the reason he resided in Bluffton at the time he was playing shortstop for the Boston and New York American League teams and during winter months played basketball with the team here to keep in condition. He now operates bowling alleys in Fort Wayne.

Robert Cummins, who scored the record of 31 field goals, formerly played on the Freshman team at Indiana university. He is now a cashier in the Old-First National bank here.

Edwin Bolton operates a variety store Sturgis Mich., and Cletus Kyle, the other forward, is manager of an oil company in this city.

Ralph Humbert, the Bluffton center, played with the Huntington high school team before playing with the Bluffton squad. He now resides in Fort Wayne.

Earl E. (Red) Moomaw, guard, was at one time captain of the Indiana university football team. He resides in Indianapolis, where he works as a manager for an insurance company.

Ernest Shoemaker, who starred in track at Purdue, and who was another guard on the Bluffton team, also resides in Indianapolis. He is in the offices of the Indiana Service Corporation.

Victor Prough, the other player seeing duty in the game, now lives in Buffalo N.Y. He starred at one time on Bluffton high school teams.

While the record game was played over 16 years ago, all of the players who could be located here remembered it well and were able to describe it. They agreed that at the start of the game their plays started clicking and they piled up such a lead the Celina players quit trying to stop them. They reported that times in the last half of the contest some of the Celina players leaned against the gymnasium wall to rest.

While the newspaper story does not mention where the game was played, the members of the Bluffton team residing here report that it was staged at the old Cherry Street gymnasium. This is in a way verified by the newspaper files, which show that other games played by the Phi Delta Kappas that year were held there.

Remember Uniforms
All of the Bluffton players interviewed remembered vividly the uniforms worn by the Celina players. They verified the newspaper report that they wore an assortment of baseball, football, and army uniforms.

Cletus Kyle informed friends last week that he could remember playing in the game for the reason had an injured arm that had kept him out of two previous games. His recollection about his arm was stated prior to the time the newspaper article was located to verify it.

In addition to establishing an authentic world’s record for shutout scores, it is believed that the 31 field goals scored by Cummins must have come close to setting an individual scoring record.

Byrl J. Masterson, Bluffton clothier, was manager of the Bluffton team. It was largely due to his remembrance of the approximate time it was held that the story was verified. He thought the game was played in February, however, instead of in January.

Wow! That was a game Celina probably wanted to forget. I wonder if that shutout still stands as a world’s record.

There was a photo with the above article, which unfortunately I do not have:

PHOTO CAPTION: BLUFFTON PHI DELTA TEAM CLAIMED RECORD-This is the Bluffton Phi Delta Kappa basketball team that beat Celina, Ohio 138-0 on Jan 30, 1919. Back in 1935, the News-Banner assembled accounts of the game and other records elsewhere, with the claim then, as reprinted below, of a world record. Left to right are Ralph Humbert, Robert Cummins, Earl Moomaw, Victor Prough, Ernest Shoemaker, Edwin Bolton, Cletus Kyle. Team Manager was Byrl Masterson. Mrs. Marie Kyle supplied the photo above and clipping below.

However, I found a photo of the Phi Delta Kappa team, dated March 1919. This could very well be the same team photo, as the same players are lined up in the same order: [1]

Phi Delta Kappa basketball team, Bluffton, IN, 1919.

I found a very short piece about the game on Newspapers.com:

Celina Defeated
(Special to the news)
BLUFFTON, Ind., 31 Jan—Bluffton Phi Delta Kappas defeated Celina in basketball here Thursday evening 138 to 0. There was only one foul in the whole game. [2]

Celina Defeated by Phi Delta Kappa, 1919.

Here is another longer about the game, written in 1935:

Score Of 138-0 Hung Up In Bluffton Cage Game Played in 1919
Bluffton, In., Feb. 12—Local sports writers have discovered in old newspaper files an account of a basketball game played here on January 30, 1919, in which the old Bluffton Phi Delta Kappa team, an independent outfit, defeated the Phi Delta Kappa team from Celina, O., by a score of 138 to 0.

The game is believed to be a record for basketball.

The game was played at the old Cherry street gym. Robert Cummings, a star of the early days at Bluffton High School, later a forward at I.U., and at present employed in the Old First National Bank, scored thirty-one field goals, believed to be another record. Edwin Bolton, now operating a store at Sturgis, Mich., another forward on the team, scored twenty field goals.

Earl (Red) Moomaw, later and I.U. football star, was a guard on the Bluffton team. The other guard was Ernest Shoemaker, now employed in the offices of the Indiana Service Corporation at Indianapolis. Ralph Humbert, of Huntington, was the center for Bluffton. [3]

Celina defeated by Phi Delta Kappa, 138-0, in 1919.

I searched for the Phi Delta Kappa basketball team on Newspapers.com and there are quite a few newspapers articles about the Bluffton team, who were the state champions in 1919. One article indicates that they had a game with the Oswego, N.Y. team, [4] so they played teams from much farther away.

Thank you so much, Lynne, for taking the time to let me know about this interesting story.

 

[1] “Bluffton Phi Delta Kappas, Who Clash with Kokomo Chamber of Commerce Five for State Championship at Concordia Gym To-Night,” The Fort Wayne Sentinel, Fort Wayne, IN, 20 Mar 1919, p.10; Newspapers.com.

[2] “Celina Defeated,” The Fort Wayne Sentinel, Fort Wayne, IN, 31 Jan 1919, p.13; Newspapers.com.

[3] “Score Of 138-0 Hung Up In Bluffton Cage Game Played in 1919,” The Star Press, Muncie, IN, 13 Feb 1935, p.10; Newspapers.com.

 [4] “Will Play Oswego,” The Fort Wayne Sentinel, Fort Wayne, IN, 12 Feb 1919, p.4; Newspapers.com.

Oct 02

Tombstone Tuesday–John Kreiselmeyer

John Kreiselmeyer, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm, Van Wert County, Ohio. (2012 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of John Kreiselmeyer, located in row 5 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm, Van Wert County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

John
Kreiselmeyer
Died
20 Jul 1887
Aged
32 y. 8 m. 21 d.

Johann “John” Kreiselmeyer was born 29 November 1854 in Willshire Township, Van Wert County, Ohio, the son of Christoph and Susanna (Schwab) Kreiselmeyer. According to the records of Zion Lutheran Church, Schumm, he was baptized at home on 3 December 1854 with Johann Brenner and his wife Elisabetha serving as sponsors.

John Kreiselmeyer, living with his family in Willshire Township in 1860: Christoph, 38; Susanna, 28; Mary, 11; David, 9; John, 6; Hannah,1. This enumeration indicates all were born in Ohio. [1]  

In 1870 John Kreiselmeyer still lived on the family farm in Willshire Township with his parents and siblings. Their household in 1870: Christoph, 48; Susanna, 39; John, 15; Hannah, 11; Fredrick, 7; Anna, 4; and William, 11 months. This enumeration indicates that the father was born in Bavaria and the other family members were born in Ohio. [2]

John Kreiselmeyer married his neighbor Emma Seaman sometime between 1870 and 1880, but I could not find a record of their marriage. The Kreiselmeyers and Seamans lived near each other for years and both families attended Zion Schumm, so I assumed John and Emma would have married at Zion Schumm. But their marriage is not in their records. [I am using the most common spelling here, Seaman, although it is spelled as Seemann in Zion Schumm’s records.]

In 1880 John and Emma [Seaman] Kreiselmeyer lived in Willshire Township with her parents John and Anna Maria Seaman. The John and Emma Kreiselmeyer household in 1880: John [Seaman], 65; Anna Maria [Seaman], 61, John [Kreiselmeyer], 28; Emma [Kreiselmeyer], 21; and Fredric Rattach, 21. They were farmers and Rattach was their farm laborer. Emma’s parents were born in Wuerttemberg and John and Emma were born in Ohio. [3]

The church records indicate that John Kreiselmeyer died of typhoid fever at 3:30 in the afternoon of 20 July 1887. He was 32 years, 8 months, and 20 days old and was buried on the 22nd. His funeral text was John 8:51.

Van Wert County Death Records indicate that John died of bilious fever, a term used for a fever that was accompanied by nausea or vomiting and strong diarrhea. His probate death record indicates he was born in Willshire Township, where he also died, and that he was married. This record shows he was 32 years, 8 months, and 21 days old, one day older that the church record indicates. [4]

It appears John that John and Emma did not have any children. John’s widow Emma died 4 April 1896 and is buried in row 7 of Zion Schumm’s cemetery.

John Kreiselmeyer, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm, Van Wert County, Ohio. (2012 photo by Karen)

 

 

[1] 1860 U.S. Census, Willshire Twp, Van Wert Co, Oh, p.150 [penned], dwelling 1072, family 1066, Christopher Railselmeyers [Kreiselmeyer]; Ancestry.com (https://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=7667&path= : viewed 17 Sep 2018).

[2] 1870 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, p.436A [stamped], dwelling 95, family 96, Christ Kreisshenier; Ancestry.com ( https://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?htx=List&dbid=7163&offerid=0%3a7858%3a0 : viewed 1 Oct 2018).

[3] 1880 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 154, p.449A [stamped], family 113, John Kreiselmyer; Ancestry.com (https://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?htx=List&dbid=6742&offerid=0%3a7858%3a0 : viewed 1 Oct 2018).

[4] “Ohio, County Death Records, 1840-2001,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-672G-MH?i=312&cc=2128172 : viewed 1 Oct 2018), John Kreiselmeyer, 20 Jul 1887; Willshire Twp., Van Wert County Deaths, p.282, no. 153; FHL microfilm 1015858.

 

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