Jul 20

Stripping the Bed

I really like quilts. All quilts. But my particular favorites are antique quilts. And I am fortunate to have a few very special antique quilts that were made by my grandma Schumm, my great-grandma Miller, my mother, and a great-grandaunt.

Quilt made before 1882 by Christena (Rueck) Miller & Rosina (Schinnerer) Schumm.

Quilt made before 1882 by Christena (Rueck) Miller & Rosina (Schinnerer) Schumm.

A couple knowledgeable quilt people have told me one of the best ways to store quilts is to put them on a bed, preferably a spare bed that isn’t used too often. That way they don’t have to be folded or wrapped up in some special material. This method also has the advantage that the quilts are fairly easy to see. You just start pulling back the layers of quilts and you can see them one by one. Which also makes it easy to show your quilt collection to another quilt enthusiast.

Our spare bedroom is furnished with my grandpa Schumm’s old iron bed, a bed perfect for layering my quilts. In fact, I have nine quilts layered on that little bed, and they make the mattress appear quite thick. It seems to be the perfect place to store these family heirlooms.

That is, until we get company.

This weekend is our annual Miller reunion and my cousin will be staying with us over the weekend. I don’t think she would care to sleep under nine quilts, so yesterday I stripped the bed and moved all the quilts into my office.

Double wedding ring quilt made by Florence (Schumm) Miller.

Stripping the bed yesterday was not a bad job at all and I rather enjoyed it. It gave me a chance to look at and touch those beautiful quilts again. I enjoy studying all the different fabrics used to piece them together and looking at my grandma Schumm’s tiny stitches. I remember when my mom made the double wedding ring quilt. It was the first quilt she ever made and turned out to be quite a challenging project, but it turned out beautiful. My grandma Schumm stitched the small baby quilt for the birth of our son Jeff. What wonderful memories!

Bow-tie quilt made by Hilda (Scaer) Schumm.

Nine patch quilt made by Hilda (Scaer) Schumm.

Bow-tie quilt made by Hilda (Scaer) Schumm.

Baby quilt stitched by Hilda (Scaer) Schumm for Karen’s son Jeff.

The oldest family quilts I have were stitched by my great-grandmother Christena (Rueck) Miller and my great-grandaunt Rosina (Schinnerer) Schumm, before Christena married Jacob Miller in 1882. Christena was staying with the Schumm family at the time, decades before my parents married and the two families came together. Christena loved to quilt, a skill she learned from Rosina Schumm.

I love all of these old quilts. It probably comes as no surprise, but I have collected some other old quilts, too, not family heirlooms, but still beautiful works of art. I think about how these quilts were lovingly made. All the time it took to chose and cut the fabric, piece it together, and quilt it. It seems most women back then enjoyed quilting and sometimes several women worked together to make a quilt. They undoubtedly had some interesting and lively conversations during their quilting sessions. I think about how pretty these colorful quilts would have looked on a bed or hanging on a clothesline to air out in the spring. I think about who may have used these quilts to keep warm in the winter. Some of these quilts were never used but I can tell some of them were used a lot and are worn, tattered, and stained.

I actually don’t mind a worn, stained quilt. I like to think how it was lovingly used by some family many years ago.

Jul 17

Tombstone Tuesday–George & Mary E. (Gunsett) Weinmann

George & Mary E. (Gunsett) Weinmann, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm, Van Wert County, Ohio. (2012 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of George and Mary Elizabeth (Gunsett) Weinmann, located in row 2 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm, Van Wert County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

WEINMANN
George
1859-1958
Mary E.
1860-1947

John “George” Weinmann was born 18 September 1859 in Germany, the son of Johann George Sr (1829-1907) and Katharine (Karcher) (1832-1907) Weinmann. [1]

In 1880 George Weinmann, 20 years old and single, lived with his parents in Liberty Township, Mercer County, Ohio, just outside the village of Chatt, near Peter Strabel. His father was a farmer and all three of the family members were born in Alsace. According to the 1900 census they immigrated in 1872. Their household in 1880: John George, 50; Katherine, 47; and George, 20. [2]

George Weinmann married Mary Gunsett on 20 November 1884 in Van Wert County, Ohio, married by Rev. G.F.C Seemeyer. [3]

Maria “Mary” Elizabeth Gunsett was born 31 December 1860 in Tully Township, Van Wert County, Ohio, the daughter of Josiah (c1837-1894) and Hannah (Wyandt) (1839-1939) Gunsett. Josiah and Hannah were both born in Ohio. [4]

Mary’s family lived in Tully Township in 1870, where her father farmed. Everyone in the family was born in Ohio. Their family in 1870: Josiah Gunsett, 33; Hannah, 29; Mary, 10; Joseph, 7; Henry, 5; and Catherine, 2. [5]

By 1880 Mary’s parents had moved to Harrison Township but Mary was not enumerated with the rest of the family: Josiah Gunsett, 43; Hannah, 41; Joseph, 17; Henry, 14; Kathrine, 12; Charles, 9; Maggie M, 6; George, 4; and John L, 1. [6] I am not sure where Mary was living in 1880 but she married George Weinmann in 1884.

George and Mary Weinmann’s first two children, two sons, Walter T. and Willie H., died at a very young age in 1887.

By 1900 there were four children in the family. The George Weinmann family in 1900: George, 40; Mary E, 39; Carl H, 11; Minnie K, 9; Otto J, 4; Lina E, 4 months. This enumeration indicates that George immigrated in 1872 and that he was a day laborer. [7]

Their daughter Lilna died in 1901 and they had another son, Edward, born in 1903.

The George Weinmann family in 1910: George, 50; Mary, 45; Carl, 21; Minnie, 18; Otto, 14; and Edward, 6. George was born in Germany and was a general farmer. Mary was born in Ohio and had given birth to 7 children, 4 of whom were living. One of their neighbors was my great-great-grandmother Maria (Sekel) Breuninger. [8]

The George Weinmann family in 1920: George, 60; Mary, 59; Carl, 31; and Edward, 16. This enumeration indicates that George was born in Alsace Lorraine, that he immigrated in 1872 and was naturalized in 1880. George’s occupation was a merchant. [9]

In 1930 the George Weinmann family lived in the little village of Schumm in a home they rented next to their son Carl and his family. The George Weinmann family in 1930: George, 70; Mary, 69; and Edward, 26. This enumeration indicates that George and his parents were born in France, which could be Alsace Lorraine, as indicated in the 1920 census. No occupation was given for George and perhaps he was retired. Carl’s family consisted of wife Ester and daughter Betty J. [10]

In 1940 the George Weinmann family lived in same house as they had in 1935: George, 80; Mary, 79; and Edward, 36. No occupation was given for George or Edward. [11]

Maria (Gunsett) Weinmann died of cancer at the Adams County Memorial Hospital in in Decatur, Indiana, on 8 May 1943, at the age of 82 years, 4 months, and 8 days. She was buried on the 10th and Zion’s Rev. A. Moeller was in charge of the service. Zwick’s was in charge of the funeral arrangements. [4]

George Weinmann died of a stroke at the home of his daughter Katherine Sauer, on Nuttman Street in Decatur, Indiana, on 22 January 1958. He had been living with his daughter in Decatur for 5 months. George was born in Alsace Lorraine and was a widower. He was 98 years old and had been a postmaster and owner/operator of a general store in Schumm. George was buried on the 25th, with Zwick’s in charge of the funeral arrangements. [12]

George and Maria Weinmann had the following children:
Walter T. (1885-1887)
Willie H. (1887-1887)
Carl Hermann (1888-1971), married Esther Berdie Dull
Minna Katherine (1891-1979), married Philip Sauer
Otto Emanuel (1895-?)married Annis/Annie Stetler
Lina Elisabeth (1899-1901)
Edward George (1903-1971)

[1] In this blog post I am using the Weinmann spelling, as inscribed on their tombstone.

[2] 1880 U.S. Census, Liberty, Mercer, Ohio, ED 188, p.472C, dwelling 18, family 19, John G Weinman; Ancestry.com (https://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?htx=List&dbid=6742&offerid=0%3a7858%3a0 : viewed 16 Jul 2018.

[3] “Ohio Marriages, 1880-1958,” database, FamilySearch.org (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XDL4-JBC : 8 Dec 2017) George Weinman & Mary E. Gunsett, 20 Nov 1884; FHL microfilm 1015861.

[4] Indiana, Death Certificates, 1899-2011, 1943, Roll 6, Indiana Archives and Records Administration, Indianapolis, Mrs. Mary E. Weinman, 8 May 1943; Ancestry.com : viewed 16 July 2018.

[5] 1870 U.S. Census, Tully, Van Wert, Ohio, p.389B, dwelling & family 178, Josiah Gunsett; Ancestry.com  (https://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?htx=List&dbid=7163&offerid=0%3a7858%3a0 : viewed 16 Jul 2018).

[6] 1880 U.S. Census, Harrison, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 148, p.308D, dwelling 139, family 142, Josiah Gumsett; Ancestry.com (https://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?htx=List&dbid=6742&offerid=0%3a7858%3a0 : viewed 16 Jul 2018). Note by kmb: Mary’s brother Joseph Gunsett (1865-1931) married my great-aunt Clara Schinnerer (1866-1942), daughter of Friedrich Schinnerer. Small world!

[7] 1900 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 98, p.11, dwelling 218, family 223, George Weimann; Ancestry.com (https://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?htx=List&dbid=7602&offerid=0%3a7858%3a0 : viewed 16 Jul 2018).

[8] 1910 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 114, p.1B, dwelling/family 17, George Weinman; Ancestry.com  (https://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?htx=List&dbid=7884&offerid=0%3a7858%3a0 : accessed 9 Jul 2018).

[9] 1920 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 146, p.2B, dwelling & family 47, George Weinman;  Ancestry.com (https://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?htx=List&dbid=6061&offerid=0%3a7858%3a0 : accessed 7 Jul 2018).

[10] 1930 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 24, p.5A, dwelling 101, family 103, George Wimman; Ancestry.com (https://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?htx=List&dbid=6224&offerid=0%3a7858%3a0 : accessed 9 Jul 2018).

[11] 1940 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 81-28, p.5A, household 95, Geo Weinman; Ancestry.com (https://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?htx=List&dbid=2442&offerid=0%3a7858%3a0 : accessed 9 Jul 2018).

[12] Indiana, Death Certificates, 1899-2011, 1958, Roll 1, Indiana Archives and Records Administration, Indianapolis, John George Weinman, 22 Jan 1958; Ancestry.com : viewed 16 July 2018.

Jul 13

Schumm Parochial School Dynamited in 1918

One hundred years ago our country was involved in World War I, united with our allies fighting against Germany and its allies in Europe. While our soldiers were fighting the Germans overseas, back here at home anti-German sentiment was directed at German-Americans. Some of that occurred in Ohio. Some even occurred in our community.

During WWI there was hostility toward German-Americans and anything German. Anyone suspected of being sympathetic to the German cause faced persecution. The anti-German sentiment was considered to be a show of patriotism for the American war effort by some and as a result, German-Americans were targeted and persecuted. Many assumed that people of German descent were traitors. Some government actions promoted anti-German activities and included the censorship of German literature, the recommendation to remove pro-German books from libraries, as well as a published list of approved books that were not considered to be pro-German. Some towns and cities re-named streets that had German names. The Ohio state legislature passed the Ake Law, which banned the teaching of the German language below the eighth grade in all schools. [1]  

The Schumm area was settled by German immigrants and unfortunately Schumm was not immune to this anti-German sentiment in 1918.

In fact, the Schumm parochial school building was targeted. It was dynamited in the fall of 1918, likely connected to the Ake Law mentioned above.

Zion Lutheran Parochial School, Schumm, Ohio (built in 1899)

I had heard about this incident but had never really read much about it. A genealogy friend recently sent me a copy of the following newspaper clipping about the incident:

BUILDING DYNAMITED
School House in Willshire Township Where German Was Taught Wrecked With Explosives

The parochial school building of the Schumm Evangelical Lutheran Church, in Willshire township, a brick structure, about twenty-four by thirty-two feet in dimensions, was badly wrecked at an early hour Sunday morning. The damage to the building was caused by an explosion of a large quantity of dynamite placed under the Northeast corner of the building by unknown parties. The theory is that the act was perpetrated by parties who resent the fact that German is taught in the parochial school and that services are still conducted in German in the church. The charge of dynamite was placed under the building by removing the covering in of a small ventilator in the foundation, directly under the window at the Northeast corner. The force of the explosion was so great that one end of the building was blown out, every window was broken, the seats were blown loose from their fastenings on the floor, the ceiling was wrecked and the entire North wall was damaged. The vibrations caused by the explosion created a report which was heard for miles around, indicating that a large quantity of the explosion was set off.

Immediately following the explosion, which occurred at 1:45 o”clock, Sheriff Gunsett and Deputy Sheriff Wilson and Patrolman Jones, of the city police force, opened an inquiry. Sheriff Gunsett is continuing the investigation, following out clues picked up from his inspection made shortly after the explosion. The evidence shows that the parties came to the school house in an automobile and that they traveled away on a zig-zag course for the purpose of concealing their movement. They were traced a distance of fifteen miles by means of peculiar marks made on the soft roadway by the rear tires of the automobile, the tread on one tire being a cross-bar and the other of a type which left beaded marks on the ground. They traveled South to the cross roads, East one-half mile, North two miles through Glenmore, one-half mile West, two miles North, thence West, one-half mile North, thence to the State line, North one-half mile to Decatur, where the trail was lost on a paved street.

The Schumm Church is in charge of Rev. George Meyer. Both English and German has been taught in the parochial school and in the church services in German have been held regularly, with one service in English each month. The officers of the law are still investigating the case in the hope of bringing to justice the parties guilty of placing and exploding the dynamite. The view of the officers is emphatic to the end that while un-patriotic utterances and un-patriotic attitudes are not to the countenanced, at the same time acts of violence—the endangering of life or the destruction of property, or anything that savors of mob spirit, is not the method or the cure of offense against the country, consequently, the offender will be brought to the bar of justice if their identity can be established. [2]

Another newspaper account, from the Lima Daily News, wrongly reported that the Schumm school was in Delphos. This account states…Public sentiment had failed to stop the teaching of German in this school, which is the property of the Schumm German Evangelical Lutheran church, so the residents took matters into their own hands…Officials of the church have offered a reward of $200 for the conviction of the persons implicated. [3]

I wonder if they ever caught those responsible for the act.

It is hard to imagine that type of violence, a hate-crime really, in Schumm 100 years ago, especially violence to a parochial school. You hear about this type of act but it usually happens somewhere else. Not so close to home. The attack likely stemmed from the fact that the school taught German. Thank goodness no one was injured.

How ironic that at that same time there were young German-American men from Schumm fighting the Germans in Europe, risking their lives. One that comes to mind is Emmanuel Schumm, and there were others.

It was around this same time that Zion Chatt stopped holding services in German and Zion Schumm may have done the same.

 

[1] Anti-German Sentiment, Ohio History Central.org, viewed 12 July 2018.

[2] Van Wert Daily Bulletin, Van Wert, Ohio, 21 Oct 1918, pg. 3.

[3] Lima Daily News, 22 Oct 1918.

Jul 10

Tombstone Tuesday–Edward G. Weinman

Edward G. Weinman, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm, Van Wert County, Ohio. (2012 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Edward George Weinman, located in row 7 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm, Van Wert County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

EDWARD G.
WEINMAN
Oct. 4, 1903
Oct. 3, 1971

Edward George Weinman was born 4 October 1903, the son of George and Maria (Gunsett) Weinman. [1] Edward was baptized at Zion Schumm on 18 October 1903 with George Grund and Albert Weinman serving as his sponsors.

The George Weinman family in 1910, the first census Edward was enumerated in: George, 50; Mary, 45; Carl, 21; Minnie, 18; Otto, 14; and Edward, 6. The father George was born in Germany and was a general farmer. Edward’s mother Mary was born in Ohio and had given birth to 7 children, 4 of whom were living. I see that one of their neighbors was my great-great-grandmother Maria (Sekel) Breuninger. [2]

The George Weinman family in 1920: George, 60; Mary, 59; Carl, 31; and Edward, 16. This enumeration indicates that the father George was born in Alsace Lorraine, that he immigrated in 1872 and was naturalized in 1880. George’s occupation was a merchant. Edward, at age 16, was not employed. I noticed that they had many Schumm neighbors, which is no surprise. [3]

In 1930 the George Weinman family lived in the village of Schumm, in a home they rented. The George Weinman family in 1930: George, 70; Mary, 69; and Edward, 26. This enumeration indicates that George and his parents were born in France, which could be Alsace Lorraine as indicated in the 1920 census. Edward was employed as a laborer. No occupation was given for the father so perhaps he was retired. They lived next to son Carl and his family. Carl’s family consisted of wife Ester and daughter Betty J. [4]

The George Weinman family in 1940: George, 80; Mary, 79; and Edward, 36. The family lived in same house as they had in 1935. No occupation was given for George or Edward. [5]

Edward Weinman died 3 October 1971, just a day shy of his 68th birthday. Edward’s obituary:

Edward Weinman
Edward Weinman, 67, of Schumm Road, Rt. 1, Willshire, died at 2:30 p.m. Sunday in Van Wert Manor Nursing Home following an extended illness.

Born Oct. 4, 1903, in Willshire Township, he was a son of J. George and Mary Elizabeth (Gusett) Weinman.

Survivors include a sister, Mrs. Philip (Minna) Sauer of Decatur, Ind.

Four brothers preceded him in death, including Carl H., who died Aug. 29 of this year.

Mr. Weinman was at one time a grocery store clerk and also had been a watchman at the Schumm Saw Mill. He was a member of the Zion Lutheran Church in Willshire.

Funeral services will be at 2:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Cowan and Son Funeral Home with the Rev. Robert D. Schuler officiating.

Burial will be in Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Willshire Township.

Friends may call at the funeral home after 7 p.m. today. [6]

Edward George had three siblings that lived to adulthood:
Carl Hermann (1888-1971), married Esther Berdie Dull
Minna Katherine (1891-1979), married Philip Sauer
Otto Emanuel (1895- ), married Annie M. Stetler

Three siblings preceded him in death–Walter T. (1885-1887), Willie H. (1887-1887), and Lina Elisabeth (1899-1901).

Edward’s mother Mary died in 1943 and his father George died in 1958. They are both buried in Zion Schumm’s cemetery.

Edward never married.

 

[1] Years ago, in the church records and other records, this surname was spelled Weinmann. In this blog post I am using the Weinman spelling, as inscribed on Edward’s tombstone and is the more common spelling used today. Edward’s baptismal record spelled his name Weinmann.

[2] 1910 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 114, p.1B, dwelling & family 17, George Weinman; Ancestry.com  (https://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?htx=List&dbid=7884&offerid=0%3a7858%3a0 : viewed 9 Jul 2018).

[3] 1920 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 146, p.2B, dwelling & family 47, George Weinman;  Ancestry.com (https://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?htx=List&dbid=6061&offerid=0%3a7858%3a0 : viewed 7 Jul 2018).

[4] 1930 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 24, p.5A, dwelling 101, family 103, George Wimman; Ancestry.com (https://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?htx=List&dbid=6224&offerid=0%3a7858%3a0 : viewed 9 Jul 2018).

[5] 1940 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 81-28, p.5A, household 95, Geo Weinman; Ancestry.com (https://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?htx=List&dbid=2442&offerid=0%3a7858%3a0 : viewed 9 Jul 2018).

[6] Van Wert Times Bulletin, Van Wert, Ohio, 4 Oct 1971, p.2; Ancestry.com (https://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=8019 : viewed 8 Jul 2018).

 

 

Jul 06

Dear Mom & All–WWII Letters from Herb (part 24)

My dad, Herbert Miller, was trained as a replacement troop during the fall of 1944, arrived in Europe in December of that same year, and was assigned to Company L, 333rd Regiment, 84th Infantry Division. The 84th was known as the Railsplitters. He fought in the Battle of the Bulge in Belgium and later in parts of Luxembourg, Germany, and France.

I am continuing with the transcriptions of the letters my dad wrote home while he served his country during WWII. The war was over by this time and he served in the Occupation Force in Germany until he had enough time and points to be honorably discharged.

Herbert Miller, 84 Division, 333rd Company, WWII

As I transcribed today’s second letter I learned something very interesting, an event my dad attended that I had never heard about before. I found it very interesting and can’t believe my dad never mentioned it.

Envelope postmarked 13 July 1945, to Mr. & Mrs. Carl F. Miller, RR #1 Willshire, Ohio. Letter inside stamped Berne, Ind, 3 Aug 1945:

11 July 1945
Schriesheim, Germany

Dear Mom & All,

It’s noon, just came in from an 8 mile hike, and it is really raining. I hope we don’t have anything this afternoon, but I don’t imagine the rain will keep us in.

We don’t get much mail at all. I received 2 letters in the last five days and when we’re up in line I used to get four or five a day.

In your next letter would you send a plastic cigarette case and some flint and wick for cigarette lighter. One guy went back on pass and I asked him if he would get me one in France. When he came back he said they were only half as big as ours and they cost $50. Things are really high in France. That black leather one you got me when I was home, I lost it and that red and black cigarette lighter in a fox hole in Belgium. I also lost that trench knife I bought at Fort Meade. I lost it in the town of Haardt. A couple of machine guns had this platoon pinned down on a hillside and we made a dash for a tree but the knife blade caught on a fence and it stayed there.

How are the crops coming along? Have you cut any wheat yet? The company commander said that we would be in Germany till January. We usually have a show on Tuesday Friday, and Sunday. But we didn’t have any last night.

I traded 7 candy bars to a guy in the squad that doesn’t smoke for a carton of Lucky Strikes. We get 20 candy bars for a month, so I don’t need any cigarettes. There are 14 men in the squad here and two don’t smoke. Of these 14 men there are 6 men who have been wounded in action and these have all come into the outfit since I have.

We have night problems, 8 mile hikes and maneuvers here, just like Basic Training.

Can’t think of any more to write so I had better close. I am feeling fine and hope you are the same.

Love,
Herbie

P.S. Please send a package.

note by KMB: That was the last of the letters I have that my dad wrote to his parents in 1945. The next letter I have that he wrote to his parents is dated March 1946. However, I still have some letters he wrote in 1945, letters to his sister Em and her husband Norval “Jack” and I will continue with them.

President Truman drives by 84th Infantry Division, 26 July 1945. Herbert Miller is standing along the road. (Photo from Critical Past LLC, used with license.)

From Pfc Herbert Miller to Mr. & Mrs. Norval Weitz, Rockford, Ohio.

31 July 1945
Germany

Dear Em & Jack,

I received your letter yesterday and sure was glad to hear from you. I also received a box from [part of page missing]…thing coming [part of page missing]… very delicious.

So Norval is kept pretty busy.

Life over here is easier than farming. I mean now. All we do is training and the officers who give the classes are the same officers we had I combat. So they don’t think much of it and give us a break.

President Truman inspected the 84th Division the other day and they took a newsreel of it. If you ever see the newsreels you will find me standing along the road. We stood at a 4 yard interval on both sides of the road and the President drove between us. I’m the 8th man this side of the overhead railroad bridge.

Now we didn’t get to see very many movies. About two a week in all.

We had a [part of page missing]…the other day for [part of page missing]… One of the guys got [missing] bag of sugar and had it [part of page missing]… The whole Co. is allowed only 50 pounds of sugar a week and there are 165 in the Co.

It is raining out today and has been raining all morning. I was on guard from 03:00 to 04:00 and on barracks ordering today so that gives me a chance to write some letters.

I imagine the corn is too tall to plow now.

Must close for now. Am feeling fine and hope you are the same.

Love,
Herbie

P.S. I have plenty of razor blades. Can you get flints for the lighters? We can’t.

President Truman addresses 84th Division, 26 July 1945, Frankfurt, standing in front of an 84th Infantry Division truck with Railsplitter emblem. Critical Past LLC photo, used with license.

note by KMB: That certainly was some interesting information! He probably never thought that his daughter and others would be looking at that newsreel nearly 73 years later. I never knew that my dad saw President Truman or that he was filmed as the President drove by.

We Googled Truman Inspects the 84th and we actually found several websites that show the newsreel my dad mentioned! Below is a link to the newsreel. The portion my dad mentioned he is in is about 1:03 minutes into the film.

Harry Truman, WWII, Inspects 508th Inf Reg 26 Jul 1945, Criticalpast

Truman inspected the troops on 26 July 1945 and, although the film goes very fast, you can see the troops lined along both sides of the road and you can see the overhead railroad track my dad described. I wish I knew which side of the road and my dad was standing on, but I know he was there, along that road when President Truman drove by. Something pretty awesome to consider.

President Truman drives by 84th Infantry Division, Frankfurt, Germany, 26 July 1945. Herbert Miller standing along the road, near the bridge. (Photo from Critical Past LLC, used with license)

President Truman is in the convertible, the car in front of the sedan.

On that day, 26 July 1945, President Truman inspected the 84th Infantry Division, the 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment of the 82nd Airborne Division, and the 3rd Armored Division, all at Frankfurt, Germany. Evidently General Eisenhower was also there, at least at the inspection of the 3rd AD between Frankfurt and Darmstadt. Maybe my dad saw him, too!  

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