Apr 24

The Old Chattanooga Barber Shop Revisited

A couple years ago I wrote about Chatt’s old barber shop, a frame building that once stood north of the Fisher Hardware, between the homes of Luther & Gladys Fisher and Carl & Marcella Schroeder. [1]

Sometime around WWII the structure was moved into the woods on Schaadt Road, about ½ mile east of route 49. They re-purposed the building and it became the home of Ester Baker and her family.

I took a photo of the dilapidated building in 2013. Although the trees were not leafed out it is still very difficult to see through the underbrush and tree trunks.

Old Chattanooga Barbershop. (2013 photo by Karen)

Old Chatt barber shop. (2013 photo by Karen)

A few months ago a couple of my cousins shared a photo of the old barber shop during the time it was a residence for the Bakers. The photo was taken back in the early 1950s and their “house” was painted white at that time.

Chatt Barbershop, c1953. Photo submitted.

Chatt barber shop, c1953. Photo submitted.

My cousins lived across the road from the Bakers and played with Ester’s children Gloria and Red, shown below. The third child in the photo below may be my cousin.

Ester Baker & children, unknown date. Submitted photo.

Ester Baker & children, unknown date. Photo submitted.

Below is a more recent photo of the barber shop that became a home, taken a few years ago.

Old Chatt barbershop, converted into a home. Photo submitted.

Old Chatt barber shop, converted into a home. Photo submitted.

Old Chatt barbershop, converted into a home. Photo submitted.

Old Chatt barber shop, once used as a home. Photo submitted.

This would have been a very small home by modern standards and poorly insulated, if at all. But a family’s home nonetheless.

 

[1] “Shave and a Haircut…Tow Bits,” http://www.karenmillerbennett.com/chattanooga/shave-and-a-haircut-two-bits/ , Karen’s Chatt,  posted 12 April 2013.

Apr 21

Tombstone Tuesday–Oscar A. & Hilda M. (Schumm) Schumm

Oscar A. & Hilda M. (Schumm) Schumm, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Van Wert County, Ohio. (2012 photo by Karen)

Oscar A. & Hilda M. (Schumm) Schumm, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Van Wert County, Ohio. (2012 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Oscar A. and Hilda M. (Schumm) Schumm, located in row 7 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm, Van Wert County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

SCHUMM
Oscar A.
Oct. 31, 1890
Feb. 2, 1984

Hilda M.
Sept. 12, 1883
Sept. 28, 1974

Oscar Albert Schumm was born 31 October 1890 near Schumm, in Willshire Township, to William and Anna Maria (Heffner) Schumm. He was baptized on 9 November 1890 at Zion Schumm with J.F. Schumm and Martin Schinnerer I as his baptismal sponsors.

Oscar married Hilda Schumm on 1 November 1914 at Zion Schumm, married by Rev. George J. Meyer. Witnesses to their marriage were Arnold Schumm and Salome Schumm.

Hilda Marie Schumm was born on 12 September 1883 near Schumm to John Christian and Wilhelmina (Breuninger) Schumm. She was baptized with her twin sister Lydia on 23 September 1883 at Zion Schumm. Their baptismal sponsors were Mrs. Sarah Schumm, Mrs. Rosine Schinnerer, Mrs. Hannah German, and Margaretha Buechner.

If you recall last week’s Tombstone Tuesday post you will notice that brothers married sisters in these two families. Oscar and Paul were brothers and Hilda and Lydia were twin sisters.

After their marriage the couple lived east of Willshire where Oscar farmed. In 1920 they had one daughter, Hildred. Oscar was 29, Hilda, 36, and daughter Hildred W.M., 3. [1]

In 1930 the family lived in the home they owned on the northeast corner of Route 81 and Schumm road. Six were living in the household: Oscar, 39; Hilda 46; Hildred, 13; Harold, 8; Roman, 5; and Maria, a 74 year-old widow. Although Maria was listed as a daughter on the enumeration, she was Oscar’s mother, Anna Maria (Heffner) Schumm. She would pass away the next spring, in March of 1931. [2]

Oscar and Hilda remained in the same house when the 1940 census was enumerated. In the household with them were their three children Hildred, Harold, and Roman. [3]

Hilda Schumm died of a heart attack in or near Convoy, Tully Township, Van Wert County, on 28 September 1974, at the age of 91 years. She was buried on 1 October. [4]

Oscar Schumm died of sepsis from multiple ulcers on 2 February 1984 at the Van Wert County Hospital. He was 93 years of age. His occupation was farmer. He was buried on 6 February. [5]

Oscar and Hilda had the following children:
Hildred Wilhelmina (1916-2004)
Harold Paul (1921-1988), married Leahline Pearl Case
Roman Curtis (1924-1988)

 

[1] 1920 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 146, dwelling 59, family 60, p.3B, Oscar A. Schumm; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 April 2015); from NARA microfilm T625, roll 1446.

[2] 1930 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 24, p.2B, dwelling 42, family 43, Oscar Schumm; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com, (www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 April 2015), from FHL microfilm 2341624, from NARA microfilm T626, roll 1890.

[3] 1940 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 81-28, p.4B, house 26, Oscar Schumm; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 April 2015); from NARA microfilm T627, roll 3163.

[4] “Ohio, County Death Records, 1840-2001,” index and images, FarmilySearch (www.familysearch.org : accessed 18 April 2015), Hilda M. Schumm, 28 Sep 1974; citing Death, Tully Township, Van Wert, Ohio, item 15 cn 215, County courthouses, Ohio; from FHL microfilm 1952884.

[5] “Ohio, County Death Records, 1840-2001,” index and images, FarmilySearch (www.familysearch.org : accessed 18 April 2015), Oscar A. Schumm, 2 Feb 1984; citing Death, Pleasant Township, Van Wert, Ohio, item 3 cn 21, County courthouses, Ohio; from FHL microfilm 1952886.

Apr 17

Who was Jimson Johnson?

Who was Jimson Johnson?

My grandpa Miller knew him when he saw him. My dad saw him only once. All of my dad’s siblings have heard of him but none have ever met him.

Mr. Johnson was old enough to drive in the late 1920s and he traveled on the road between Willshire and Chatt at least once. It was on that day, long ago, when my grandfather and dad saw him, as they traveled that same road to Willshire.

Jimson Johnson may have even lived in the Willshire/Chatt area, although I have never found him in a census enumeration. But I know I never will find him there. There was a man by that name living in Ontario, Canada, at the beginning of the 20th century. But this was not our guy. [1]

Jimson is an unusual given name which cannot be found on various Meaning of Your Name websites. Going by naming patterns, the name could mean “son of Jim.” The Johnson surname often meant “son of John.” Was he the son of Jim or the son of John?

As far as I know we do not have any Johnson relatives, but growing up I heard the name Jimson Johnson many times and am very familiar with the name. Interesting, though, that his name is usually accompanied with a snicker. Who was he? Who was this Jimson Johnson?

There were other Johnson families in the area, like Ivan Johnson, who owned a garage in Chatt. But Jimson was not related to him or any of the other local Johnsons. I know this because Jimson Johnson came from nowhere and was related to no one around here.

Yes, there is a story behind this name. A story that shows what can happen when an frustrated parent is trapped in a car with an inquiring young child.

Carl Miller, father of Herb.

Carl Miller, father of Herb.

My grandpa Miller was not known for his patience. I believe that many of German heritage during that era were rather short-tempered. After all, they had a lot on their minds–farming, supporting a growing family, and the Great Depression. That could lead to a serious and stern disposition.

And there was my dad, the first son born to Carl and Gertrude Miller. He was about 3 years old at the time and was an inquisitive, talkative boy. My dad always went along to town with his father. Grandpa took him everywhere. The two of them, father and son, were in a car going to Willshire one day in the late 1920s.

The earliest photo I have of Herb Miller.

The earliest photo I have of Herb Miller.

As they drove to their destination my dad wanted to know who the person was in each and every car they met. He evidently thought his father knew the name of everyone on the road.

“Who is that?” “What is his name?” “Who is that?” “Who was that in that car?” Over and over and over again. During the whole ride to town and back. My dad was very persistent and my grandfather’s patience was nearly gone.

My dad’s father could not stand it any longer. He had heard enough questions. He had to do something to quiet his young son.

Grandpa did what he had to. He gave the driver of one car a name. Grandpa made up a name–Jimson Johnson. A name with a nice ring to it and fun for a child to say.

It was Jimson Johnson driving one of the cars they passed on the road to Willshire that day. Finally! Someone his father knew. Some person in a car had a name. My dad liked that.

It was actually very clever on my grandpa’s part. It satisfied my dad’s curiosity and when my dad got home he could not wait to tell his mother that they had seen Jimson Johnson that day.

Grandma wondered who in the world Jimson Johnson was and grandpa had to admit to her that he made up the name to quiet my dad.

Next Tuesday, 21 April 2015, will be the third anniversary of my dad’s passing. We miss him every day.

Herb Miller (1925-2014)

Herb Miller (1925-2012)

 

[1] 1901 Census of Canada, Ancestry.com index, accessed 16 April 2015. This index indicates Jimson Johnson was born in 1874 and resided in Bothwell, Ontario, in 1901.

Apr 14

Tombstone Tuesday–Paul E. & Lydia B. (Schumm) Schumm

Paul E. & Lydia B. (Schumm) Schumm, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm, Van Wert County, Ohio. (2012 photoby Karen.

Paul E. & Lydia B. (Schumm) Schumm, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm, Van Wert County, Ohio. (2012 photo by Karen.

This is the tombstone of Paul E. and Lydia B. (Schumm) Schumm, located in row 6 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm, Van Wert County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

SCHUMM
Paul E.
1888-1970
Lydia B.
1883-1967

Paul Edwin Schumm was born in Willshire Township on 31 August 1888, the son of William and Anna Maria (Heffner) Schumm. He was baptized 9 September 1888 at Zion Schumm, with Heinrich Schumm II and Ferdinand Schumm as his sponsors.

In 1910 Paul lived on family farm east of Willshire with his widowed mother Mary and his siblings Oscar and Julia. Paul’s occupation was a farmer. [1]

According to church records, Paul Schumm married Lydia Schumm on 14 April 1914 at Zion Schumm’s parsonage. They were married by Rev. George J. Meyer and witnesses to the marriage were Oscar Schumm and Hilda Schumm.

Lydia Barbara Schumm was born 12 September 1883, the daughter of John Christian and Wilhelmina “Minnie” (Breuninger) Schumm. Lydia was baptized with her twin sister Hilda Maria on 23 September 1883 at Zion Schumm. Sponsors for the twins were Mrs. Sarah Schumm, Mrs. Rosine Schinnerer, Mrs. Hannah Germann, and Margaretha Buechner. Lydia’s mother Minnie was the sister of my great-grandmother Sarah (Breuninger) Schumm, one of the above sponsors.

A few years later, on 5 June 1917, Paul Schumm applied for the WWI Draft in Van Wert. He was married with one child at that time and lived at route 2 Willshire. He was of medium height, stout build, had light blue eyes, and dark brown hair. [2]

In 1920 Paul, age 31, and Lydia, age 36, lived on their farm east of Willshire, where Paul farmed. They owned their home and also in the household were daughters Mildred M, 3 years, and Delores M, 3 months, as well as Paul’s widowed mother, Mary Ann, age 64. [3]

Paul and Lydia remained on their family farm on the northeast corner of route 81 and Harrison-Willshire Road and in 1940 their household consisted of Paul, 51, Lydia, 56, daughters Mildred, 23, Lola, 17, Ellen, 15, and Paul’s sister-in-law Salome Schumm, age 47. Paul was a farmer and daughter Mildred was a secretary at an elevator. In fact, Mildred worked at the grain elevator in Willshire, where a few years later she trained my mother in the ins and outs of bookkeeping. [4]

Lydia Schumm died at home on 10 May 1967, at the age of 83 years, 7 months, and 28 days. She was buried on 14 May, with Rev. Elmer Braun in charge of the service. According to Zion Schumm’s records survivors included her husband; daughters Mildred Franz, Delores, Lola, and Ellen Black; sisters Hilda, Salome, and Elizabeth Linser; a brother Arnold; and 2 grandchildren.

Paul E. Schumm died at the Van Wert County Hospital on 8 September 1970, at the age of 82 years, 8 days. He was buried on 12 September, with Rev. Robert Schuler in charge of the service. According to church records survivors included four daughters; one brother, Oscar; and 2 grandchildren.

Paul and Lydia had the following children:
“Mildred” Maria (1916-2004), married Christian Franz
“Dolores” Minnie (1919-2014)
“Lola” Thelma (1922- )
“Ellen” May (1925- ), married Ray Black

 

[1] 1910 U.S. Census, Willshire Township, Van Wert County, Ohio, ED 114, p.1B, dwelling 15, family 15, Mary Schumm, from FHL microfilm 1375251, from NARA microfilm T624, roll 1238.

[2] U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, database on-line, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 15 April 2015), from NARA microfilm M1509, roll 1851249.

[3] 1920 U.S. Census, Willshire Township, Van Wert County, Ohio, ED 146, p.4B, dwelling 81, Paul E. Schumm; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com, (www.ancestry.com : accessed 12 April 2015); from NARA microfilm T625, roll 1446.

[4] 1940 U.S. Census, Willshire Township, Van Wert County, Ohio, Ed 81-26, p.8A, house no. 164, Paul Schumm; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 12 April 2015); from NARA microfilm T627, roll 3163.

Apr 10

2015 OGS Conference, Columbus, Ohio

Greetings from Columbus, Ohio! I am here to attend the 2015 Ohio Genealogical Conference, “Ohio, Your Genealogical Cornerstone.” The society’s 54th annual conference is being held 8-11 April at the Sheraton at Capitol Square. Miriam, my genealogy friend and traveling companion, and I have been here since Wednesday evening.

Wednesday was quite a busy day. I left home at the crack of dawn, headed to the Vera Bradley outlet sale in Fort Wayne. By the end of the day I was meeting up with genealogy friends here in Columbus. I have been on the go ever since.

OGS never fails to put on a first class conference and this year is no exception. Some of the nation’s best genealogy speakers are here and I look forward to hearing and learning more today and tomorrow.

Thursday I learned about Ohio’s early laws and history, researching school records, forensic genealogy, circumstantial evidence, and organizing DNA matches. Each of those sessions was excellent and I can’t wait to hear and learn more tomorrow.

Below are a few photos from this year’s conference.

2015 OGS Conference theme.

2015 OGS Conference theme.

Judy Russell, JD, CG, CGL, aka The Legal Genealogist, was the keynote speaker. She makes the law very interesting.

Judy Russell, 2015 OGS keynote speaker.

Judy Russell, 2015 OGS keynote speaker.

Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG, before her session about school records.

Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG.

Peggy Clemens Lauritzen

Sisters Betsy Potts and Cindy Freed. Cindy is holding her new book, Ancestors in a Nation Divided.

Betsy Potts & Cindy Freed, with Cindy's book, "Ancestors in a Nation Divided."

Betsy Potts & Cindy Freed, with Cindy’s book, “Ancestors in a Nation Divided.”

2015 program chair Shelley Bishop did a great job planning the program and scheduling the speakers.

Shelley Bishop, 2015 OGS Program Chair.

Shelley Bishop, 2015 OGS Program Chair.

The exhibit hall. I always enjoy looking through the books and seeing new products and services.

Exhibit Hall, 2015 OGS Conference.

Exhibit Hall, 2015 OGS Conference.

Friday concluded with a social hour, “A Brick Wall Busting Good Time,” that included live music by Steve Brown and friend.

Friday evening entertainment.

Friday evening entertainment.

I am looking forward to two more days of learning, getting together with old friends, and making new ones.

Thanks to everyone who worked to make this conference a success.

 

 

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