May 03

Tombstone Tuesday–Georg Strable

Georg Strable, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

Georg Strable, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Georg Strable, located in row 5 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

Georg
Sohn von
Peter und Dora
Strable
Gest von
Marz 22, 1883
Alter von
22 Y und 5 T

Translation: Georg, son of Peter and Dora Strable, died 22 March 1883, aged 22 years, 5 days.

Note that there are several spelling variations for this surname in the church records but Strabel seems to be used the most. It is also spelled Strobel or Stroebel, but in this case, on this particular tombstone, it is spelled Strable. Georg’s parents usually used the spelling of Strabel but I am using the Strable spelling for this post since that is the way it is inscribed on this tombstone.

Georg Strable was born 17 March 1861 in Cincinnati, Ohio. Christened Johann “Georg” Strable, he was the sixth of nine children born to Peter and Margaretha Dorothea “Dora” (Herbolzheimer) Strable.

Both of his parents were born in the Kingdom of Bavaria and immigrated to America in about 1849. The family lived in Cincinnati several years before moving northward to Mercer County, Ohio, sometime between March 1861 and May 1863. Georg was born in Cincinnati during their time there but was baptized at Zion Chatt on 14 May 1863. Georg and Barbara Brummer served as his baptismal sponsors at Zion.

George Strable was confirmed at Zion Chatt on 14 April 1875.

The Peter Strable family lived on the north side of Chatt on what is now called Strable Road.

Although the family attended Zion Chatt Georg’s death was not recorded in the church records, possibly because there is a gap in the records during that time.

However, his death is recorded in the Mercer County Probate records. That record indicates that he died of measles in Liberty Township on 21 March 1883. He was 22 years and 4 days old, born in Cincinnati, and was a farmer. [1] Note that the probate information disagrees with the inscription on his tombstone by one day.

Georg’s father Peter died of dropsy in Mercer County on 12 September 1889 and his mother Dora died in Liberty Township on 18 February 1913.

Georg is buried between his parents and his sister Margaretha (Strobel/Strable) Miller. Margaretha was the second wife of my great-grandfather Jacob Miller.

 

[1] “Ohio, County Death Records, 1840-2001,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 28 Apr 2016), George Strabel, 21 Mar 1883; from Liberty Township, Mercer, Ohio, Deaths, Vol. 1, p.186-7, from FHL microfilm 914954.

Apr 29

Jacob Miller Jr Was a Woodman of the World

I always mention the unique grave markers of the Woodmen of the World in my tombstone/cemetery talk, but until a few days ago I did not know that a member of our family was a member of their fraternal benefit society.

Jacob Miller Jr's Woodmen of the World certificate, 1911.

Jacob Miller Jr’s Woodmen of the World certificate, 1911.

The Woodmen of the World is a fraternal benefit society–a non-profit organization owned and governed by its members, that combines insurance with a common bond of mutual aid and social membership organized into branches with meetings, and conventions.

The Woodmen of the World was organized by Joseph Cullen Root in June 1890 in Omaha, Nebraska. Root first founded the Modern Woodmen of the World in 1882 and it operated in nine of the central western states. Root left the Modern Woodmen in 1890 to organize Woodmen of the World. By 1889 the Woodmen of the World had over 88,000 members from all across the country. [1]

Jacob Miller Jr Woodman of the World certificate, 1911.

Jacob Miller Jr’s Woodman of the World certificate, 1911.

Jacob Miller Jr, my great-uncle, had Woodmen of the World Benefit Certificate no. 253940. Jacob Jr was a member of the Bakersfield, California, Camp no. 460, Pacific Jurisdiction. He was born in Mercer County but left Ohio before 1910 to work in the western oil fields. His certificate is dated 30 November 1910 and is stamped 16 January 1911. It shows Jacob Jr was 25 years old and was from Willshire, Ohio.

Jacob Miller Jr Woodman of the World certificate, 1911.

Jacob Miller Jr Woodman of the World certificate, 1911.

Jacob Miller Jr’s Woodman of the World certificate, 1911.

Jacob Jr’s certificate was in the amount of $500 and his father Jacob Miller Sr was the beneficiary. The certificate states that the beneficiary would receive $250 if the member died within one year of the certificate date, $375 if the member died within two years, and $500 if death occurred after two years.

Jacob Miller Jr (1886-1913)

Jacob Miller Jr (1886-1913)

Jacob Miller Jr was killed out west when an oil derrick fell on him in April of 2013. Two years had passed since Jacob Jr took out the policy so his father should have received the $500 death benefit.

Jacob Miller Jr's Woodmen of the World certificate, 1911.

Jacob Miller Jr’s Woodmen of the World certificate, 1911.

Jacob Miller Jr does not have the distinctive Woodmen of the World tree trunk tombstone or one of their “WOW” insignia that their members sometimes have. The tree stump tombstone was an early benefit of Woodmen membership but was abandoned in the late 1920s due to cost. [2] These unique markers are easy to spot in a cemetery.

Woodman of the World marker, Woodlawn Cemetery, Lima, OH (2013 photo by Karen)

Woodman of the World marker, Woodlawn Cemetery, Lima, OH (2013 photo by Karen)

Throughout the years the Woodmen have merged with other fraternal benefit societies and are still in existence today, known as WoodmanLife. [3]

 

[1] History of Woodmen of the World , accessed 28 April 2016.

[2] WoodmenLife, Wikipedia.org, accessed 28 April 20165.

[3] WoodmenLife, accessed 28 April 2016.

Apr 26

Tombstone Tuesday–Peter and Dora (Herbolzheimer) Strabel

Peter & Dora Strabel, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

Peter & Dora Strabel, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Peter and Dora (Herbolzheimer) Strabel, located in row 5 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

STRABEL
Peter
Strabel
Born
Oct. 21, 1818
Died
Sept. 12, 1889

Dora
Strabel
Born
Aug. 25, 1826
Died
Feb. 18, 1913

 

There are several spelling variations in the church records for this name but Strabel is the most common. It is also spelled Strobel, Strable, and Stroebel, with Stroebel being the German spelling.

Zion Chatt’s church records give conflicting information about Johann “Peter” Strabel’s date and place of birth. According to Zion’s Familienbuch he was born 10 February 1818 in Dottenheim, County Court Windsheim, District Mittelfranken, Kingdom of Bavaria, but according to his church death and burial record he was born 21 Oct 1819 Billberg, District Mittelfranken, Kingdom of Bavaria. His tombstone is a mixture of both dates.

Peter was the son of Gottfried & Catharina Strabel and he immigrated to the U.S. in 1849. He married Margaretha Dorothea Herbolzheimer in Cincinnati that same year, according to Zion’s records.

Margaretha Dorothea “Dora” Herbolzheimer was born 25 August 1826 in Markipsheim, County Court Windsheim, District Mittelfranken, Kingdom of Bavaria. She was the daughter of Thomas and Dorothea Herbolzheimer.

Peter and Dora Strabel resided in Cincinnati for several years before moving to Mercer County, Ohio. Several of their children were born in Cincinnati and two of their sons died there. Sometime between March 1861 and May 1863 they moved to the Chatt area.

At one time Peter and Dora Strabel owned 80 acres in Section 4 of Liberty Township and 80 acres in Section 33 of Blackcreek Township. Both farms were along what is now called Strable Road.

Peter and Dora lived in Liberty Township in 1870 and in the household were: Peter, 49; Dora, 45; John, 20; Barbary, 13; Margaret, 11; George, 9; Mark, 7; Susanna, 4; and Peter, 5/12. [1]

In 1880 Peter and Dora lived in Liberty Township with children George, 19; Michael, 16; Aver, 13; and Peter, 10. Peter Sr lived next door to their married son John, his wife Caroline, and their son Phillip. [2]

Peter Strabel died of dropsy on 12 September 1889, at the age of 70 years. He was buried on the 14th, with Rev. Chr. Reichert in charge of the service. He had been a farmer all of his life.

In 1900 Dora, a widow, lived in Liberty Township with her son Peter and his family. In the household: Peter, 30, head; Louise, 30, wife; Rudolph, 2, son; Leona D, 4/12, daughter; Strabel [Dora], mother, 74. Dora indicated that she had given birth of 9 children but only 5 were living. [3]

In 1910 Dora Strabel lived with her daughter “Affie” [Eva Barbara] and her husband John J Bollenbacher in Liberty Township. This enumeration indicates that Dora immigrated in 1848 and that she had given birth to 9 children but only 4 were living. [4]

Dora died in Liberty Township on 18 February 1913 at the age of 86 years, 6 months, and 23 days. She was buried on the 21st. According to her death certificate she died of dropsy and Bright’s Disease.

Peter and Dora Strabel had the following children:
Johann “John” Leonhard (1850-1906), married Caroline Deitsch
Johann Georg (1852-c1859)
Johann Georg (1854-c1856)
Susann “Barbara” (1857-1941), married John Williams
Margaretha (1859-1882), married Jacob Miller
Johann “Georg” (1861-1883)
Johann “Michael” (1863-1930), married Elizabeth Grauberger
Eva Barbara (1866-1943), married John Jacob Bollenbacher
Johann “Peter” (1869-1957), married Louise Fischer

As is so often the case, I have a connection to the Strabel family. Margaretha Strabel was the second wife of my great-grandfather, Jacob Miller. Jacob’s first wife, Sophia Goelzer, died in Bavaria before he immigrated to America in 1871. Jacob married Margaretha Strobel at Zion Chatt on 15 March 1877.

Jacob and Margaretha (Strabel) Miller had two sons, Johann “Peter” (1878-1957), who married Della Kuehm, and Christian Miller (1880-1911), who died of typhoid fever out west and never married. After Margaretha’s death Jacob married Christine Rueck on 9 November 1882 at Zion Lutheran Church, Schumm. I descend from Jacob and Christine Rueck. [5]

[1] 1870 U.S. Census, Liberty, Mercer, Ohio, p.150A, dwelling 131, family 117, Peter Strabel; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 24 Apr 2016); from FHL microfiom 552742, from NARA microfilm M593, roll 1243.

[2] 1880 U.S. Census, Liberty, Mercer, Ohio, ED 188, p.472C, dwelling 20, family 21, Peter Strable; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 24 Apr 2016); from FHL microfilm 1255048, from NARA microfilm T9, roll 1048.

[3] 1900 U.S. Census, Liberty, Mercer, Ohio, ED 85, p.12A, dwelling 223, family 229, Peter Strabel; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 24 Apr 2016); from FHL microfilm 1241304, from NARA microfilm T623, roll 1304.

[4] 1910 U.S. Census, Liberty, Mercer, Ohio, ED 119, p.13B, dwelling, family, John J Bollenbacher; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 24 Apr 2016); from FHL microfilm 1375227, from NARA microfilm T624, roll 1214.

[5] Tombstone Tuesday–Margaretha (Strobel) Miller blog post, 12 April 2011, Karen’s Chatt.

Apr 22

More About the Post Office in Chattanooga, Ohio

A couple weeks ago I posted some photos of Chattanooga, Ohio, postmarks. Since then I discovered yet another.

Below is a photo of an envelope that bears a 7 January 1895 Chattanooga, Ohio, postmark. The return address is to Geo Heffner, Chattanooga, Ohio, and the letter was sent to Allentown, Pennsylvania.

Chattanooga, Ohio, postmark.

1895 Chattanooga, Ohio, postmark.

And I learned more information about the post office that once was in the village of Chattanooga.

Chattanooga postmaster Phillip Hill got in a little trouble back in 1885. Well, actually probably a lot of trouble. And it appears that Hill was likely Chatt’s first postmaster.

Arrest of a Postmaster
Washington, D.C., April 17—Phillip Hill, the Postmaster at Chattanooga, Ohio, has been arrested by Post-office inspectors for stealing registered letters.
[1]

Hill 1885

Chattanooga, Ohio, Postmaster arrested, 1885.

In the following list of Chattanooga’s postmasters Hill is indexed as Philip Z Hill, although I do not see the Z.

Philip Hill was appointed postmaster of Chattanooga, Ohio, 18 September 1882. The next postmaster was John Schlenker, appointed 31 August 1885. Then William Fender, appointed 8 September 1888. And last on that line is postmaster Jacob Deitsch, appointed 24 December 1889. [2]

Chattanooga, Ohio, postmasters.

Chattanooga, Ohio, postmasters, 1882-1889.

There is a notation above Hill’s name: NB June 18, 1885, which probably refers to the fact that Hill had to leave the position. The NB means: Some mention of the office was made in the Postal Bulletin, a publication of the Post Office Department. Copies of these publications are in the Reference Library of the Post Office Department and in the Library of Congress. No copies are in the National Archives Building.

The next list of postmasters in the next volume:

Jacob Deitsch, appointed 24 Dec 1889
Henry J. Cordier, appointed 9 July 1891
Frederick Heffner, appointed 15 Jan 1894
Phillip Deitsch, appointed 18 July 1895
Andress Leistner, appointed 10 April 1899-23 March 1903
Mail to Rockford 3 May 1900
George R. Hagerman, appointed 30 Nov 1891, Effective 31 May 1900
Charles F. Wagner, appointed 14 Sep 1904 [3]

Chattanooga, Ohio, postmasters.

Chattanooga, Ohio, postmasters, 1889-1904.

Who was Phillip Hill, Chattanooga’s infamous postmaster?

I am not sure.

One Philip Hill, 10, was living in Blackcreek Township in 1850 with Christina Hill, age 40, born in Germany, probably his mother. Also in the household: Christina, 19, Germany; Anton, 14, Germany; Fredrick, 12, Ohio; and Elizabeth, 7, Ohio. [4]

Philip Hill was living with Casper and Christena (Hill) Lichtensteiger in 1860 in Blackcreek Township. Christena was Philip’s sister and Philip was their farm hand. He was age 18 and born in Ohio. How ironic that the Lichtensteiger family once owned the farm where I grew up north of Chatt. Wildcat School No. 9 was on the corner but they owned 110 acres around the school. [5]

Philip Hill was living in Willshire in 1870. Philip Hill, 28, born in Ohio, was living with Christena Hill, 61, born in Hesse, who was probably his mother. Philip was a boot and shoemaker at that time. [6]

In 1900 it appears the same Phillip Hill was living at the Mercer County Infirmary. He was age 58, single, born in Ohio in February 1842. His father was born in Germany, his mother in Pennsylvania. [7]

Philip Hill died of dropsy on 23 September 1909 in Jefferson Township, Mercer County, Ohio. He was 68 years old, born in Ohio, and his occupation was shoemaker. His death certificate indicates he was buried on 24 September in Pleasant Grove Cemetery, Van Wert County, aka Plank Cemetery, aka Winkler Cemetery, aka Van Wert-Mercer Cemetery. Although he has no tombstone Van Wert County Cemetery Inscriptions Vol. V indicates he was born 18 July 1842 and that he was the son of Philip and Christenia Hill.

Whether this is the same Philip Hill that was Chattanooga’s first postmaster remains to be discovered.

 

[1] Alton Evening Telegraph, Alton, Illinois, 17 Apr 1885, p.1: Newspapers.com, (www.newspapers.com : accessed 13 Oct 2013).

[2] Appointments of U.S. Postmasters, 1832-1971, Vol.38, p.316-17, Mercer Co, Ohio; Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 15 Apr 2016); from Records of the Post Office Department, Record Group No. 28, Vol.38, p. Washington, D.C., NARA Microfilm M841.

[3] Appointments of U.S. Postmasters, 1832-1971, Vol. 79, p.367-68; Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 15 Apr 2016); from Records of the Post Office Department, Record Group No. 28, Washington, D.C., NARA Microfilm M841.

[4] 1850 U.S. Census, Black Creek, Mercer, Ohio, p.289A, dwelling 52, family 55, Christina Hill; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 21 Apr 2016); from NARA microfilm M432, roll 710.

[5] 1860 U.S. Census, Black Creek, Mercer, Ohio, p.332, line 1, dwelling 617, family 622, C Lichgruster; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 21 Apr 2016); from FHL microfilm 805009, from NARA microfilm M653, roll 1009.

[6] 1870 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, p.449A, dwelling 24, family 26, Philip Hill; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 21 Apr 2016); from FHL microfilm 552774, from NARA microfilm M593, roll 1275.

[7] 1900 U.S. Census, Jefferson, Mercer, Ohio, ED 83, p.16A, line 40, Phillip Hill; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 21 Apr 2016); from FHL microfilm 1241304, from NARA microfilm T623, roll 1304.

[8] “Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 21 Apr 2016), Philip Hill, 23 Sep 1909; citing Jefferson Twp, Mercer, Ohio; from FHL microfilm 1927185.

 

 

 

 

 

Apr 19

Remembering Aunt Kate

In place of my regular Tombstone Tuesday I am instead posting a tribute in memory of my Aunt Kate who passed away this past weekend.

Born Catherine Jean Miller to Carl and Gertrude (Brewster) Miller in 1927, everyone knew her by the name of Kate. I was fortunate enough to be able to call her Aunt Kate.

Kate (Miller) Eichler

Kate (Miller) Eichler (1927-2016)

She was the beloved wife of Paul Eichler and they celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary just two days before Kate passed away.

Kate & Paul wedding.

Kate & Paul’s wedding, 1956.

Kate & Paul wedding.

Kate & Paul’s wedding.

Kate was also a bridesmaid in my parents’ wedding.

Wedding of Herb & Florence Miller, 1950. Kate Miller on the right in the green dress.

Wedding of Herb & Florence Miller, 1950. Kate Miller on the right in the green dress.

She was also a beloved mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, sister, aunt, and friend to many. She had an infectious smile and laugh and a great sense of humor. From what I hear, she got her sense of humor from her mother, my grandmother Gertrude (Brewster) Miller, who was just plain ornery and did all sorts of mischievous pranks.

Aunt Kate & Uncle Paul with their family, 2007 Miller reunion.

Aunt Kate & Uncle Paul with their family, 2007 Miller reunion.

Kate was the fifth of the eight Miller children. My dad was the fourth born and she was just two years younger than him. The family had many good times growing up on the farm and we enjoy hearing those stories as much as they enjoy telling them.

Carl Miller family.

Carl Miller family.

Uncle Vernie tells how his sister Kate was always afraid someone was lurking under her bed. To keep that person from grabbing her when she got into bed she would make a running jump into the bed from several feet away. One day their mother moved the bed and Kate, not knowing that, made her running leap and landed on the floor instead.

Just like all the Miller women, Kate was a very good cook and baker. When I was a teenager I spent a day at her house and she taught me how to make her award-winning Swedish Tea Ring bread. It took the better part of a day to make because it was made with yeast which had to rise. She usually entered a Swedish Tea Ring at the Mercer County Fair where she won a blue ribbon every year but one. Her family still talks about her sugar cookies as well.

Aunt Kate holding me at age 6 months.

Aunt Kate holding me at age 6 months.

Aunt Kate had a green thumb and had a beautiful flower garden. She got me to join the Rockford Garden Club back in the 70s, but my flowers and arrangements could not hold a candle to hers. She was an expert at growing and arranging flowers.

A few years back Aunt Kate and her siblings were comparing their feet. They all took off their shoes and were trying to decide who had the worst-looking feet. Due to privacy issues, I will not divulge who has the worst feet. They know who they are. The whole family has what we call Miller Feet, complete with bunions and crooked toes. My husband Joe joined in and took his shoes off, too. Although he does not have any bunions and his toes are nice and straight he does have some hair on his toes. Evidently Aunt Kate had never seen hairy toes before and she got the biggest kick out of his hairy feet. Monkey Feet she called them.

Joe and Kate loved to kid and joke around with each other. They had some good times at family gatherings and usually had their heads together laughing at some silly joke.

Aunt Kate & Joe, 2008 Miller reunion.

Aunt Kate & Joe, 2008 Miller reunion.

Aunt Kate & Joe, 2014 Miller reunion.

Aunt Kate & Joe, 2014 Miller reunion.

Aunt Kate also kept up with technology. She had her own Facebook page and she enjoyed playing on-line Scrabble with her brothers. Kate and her siblings also talked via their computers every Friday morning. They enjoyed their Miller chat time.

Aunt Kate had a way with people. The children at her church loved her and she was even able to talk her way out of a speeding ticket from a State Trooper once.

Everyone loved her. Who wouldn’t?

She was a wonderful person and it was an honor to have her as my aunt. She will truly be missed.

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