Jul 31

More DNA Test Results

Yesterday I received some preliminary results from my latest DNA test. About a month ago I sent a saliva sample to 23andMe and the results are back already. The initial results are easy to understand and, as always, are interesting.

The test results from 23andMe gave me some new information as well as reiterating some of the information I learned from my Family Tree DNA test last year.dna

I already knew that my mitochondrial DNA (DNA from my maternal ancestry) was Haplogroup H. Haplogroup H is ancestry in Europe and the Near East that traces back to eastern Africa about 50,000 years ago. It is the most prevalent haplogroup in Europe today.

23andMe reports that I am distantly related to actress Susan Sarandon on my mother’s side. Very distant, I’m sure. I doubt we are very closely related at all, but that we probably share Haplogroup H. Others in Haplogroup H include Marie Antoinette, Napoleon Bonaparte, and Prince Philip.

The 23andMe test also showed my Ancestry Composition–the percentage of my DNA from both sides of my family that shows the percentage of my DNA from 31 populations around the world. No surprises here. I am 99.6% European, with 87.4% being Northern European. The break-down is as follows:

36.2% French & German
14.3% British & Irish
4.5% Scandinavian
32.3% Broadly Northern European
.8% Iberian
.4% Sardinian
.2% Balkan
3.6% Broadly Southern European
7.3% Broadly European
.4% Sub-Saharan African/West African
.1% Middle Eastern & North African
.1% Unassigned

Northern Europe extends from Ireland, to Norway, to Finland, and to France. Southern Europe includes the Iberian, Italian, and Balkan Peninsulas, and the island of Sardinia.

I also learned a couple new and interesting things about my DNA from this test.

Listen up Brewster relatives. You will find this very interesting, too.

The story that Mary Ann Martin, wife of Jackson Brewster, was a beautiful Indian princess [well at least a Native American Indian] has been passed down through the family for as long as I can remember. It has been, and still is, a major question and debate among our Brewster line to this day. “Do Mary Ann’s high cheekbones look like those of a Native American Indian?” “Her skin and hair look dark. Was she a Native American?”

It is a great story but I always wondered how an Indian had a surname like Martin.

Now DNA tells the true story.

I have NO Native American Indian DNA. Zero. Zilch. Nein. Nyet. Nada. Nae. Scratch the Native American Indian ancestry story.

Jackson Brewster (1816-1890) & wife Mary Ann (Martin) (1822-1895.

Jackson Brewster (1816-1890) & wife Mary Ann (Martin) (1822-1895)

Another very interesting thing I learned is that my DNA is 2.8% Neanderthal. Cool! Actually this is not surprising since it is theorized that Homo sapiens interbred with Neanderthals tens of thousands of years ago in Europe. And I know that my ancient ancestors were in Europe thousands of years ago.

Neanderthals moved into Europe about 200,000 years ago and lived with the modern humans for thousands of years. Today nearly everyone outside of Africa has between 1-4% Neanderthal DNA in his genes.

I am in the 58th percentile of Neanderthal DNA among 23andME members, so I actually have a little more than average Neanderthal DNA. That could explain a lot…

These are only the preliminary DNA test results from my 23andMe DNA test. There is more information to come and I know it will be interesting.

Jul 28

Tombstone Tuesday–Infant Son of H.J. & L.B. Cordier

Infant Son of H.J. & L.B. Cordier, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

Infant Son of H.J. & L.B. Cordier, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of the infant son of Henry J. and Louisa B. (Deitsch) Cordier, located in row 1 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

INFANT
Son of
H.J. & L.B.
CORDIER
Died
April 9
1888
Aged
1 day

There are a few tombstones in Zion’s cemetery for which there is no corresponding burial record and this is one of them. The Cordier surname is only mentioned twice in Zion Chatt’s records and unfortunately neither the birth nor the burial of this infant was recorded. [1] There is another Cordier infant buried next to this child and they are brothers, and there is no recorded information for either.

Their father, Henry Cordier, may have been the child of Christian and Barbara (Holzer) Cordier, [2] born in June of 1851, likely in Marion Township, Mercer County, Ohio.

In 1880 Henry Cordier, age 29, was a physician and surgeon in the Chatt area. He was a boarder in the Jacob Deitsch home, where he met his future wife Louisa, Jacob’s17 year-old daughter. [3]

Henry and Louisa married a year and a half later in Ann Arbor, Michigan united in marriage by a justice of the peace on 4 January 1882. He was age 30, a physician, and she was 18. They stated they were both from Liberty, Ohio, and that he was born in Marion, Ohio. [4]

Louisa Barbara Deitsch was born 25 January 1864 in Liberty Township, in the area once called Brehm, near St. Paul Lutheran Church, aka St. Paul Liberty. She was the daughter of Jacob and Gertrude (Müller) Deitsch and was baptized at Zion Chatt in 1864. The Jacob Deitsch family was listed in Zion’s Familienbuch, which also mentions that Jacob moved out of the parish in 1864. They must have come back to Zion Chatt at a later time because Louisa’s parents, Jacob and Gertrude, are buried in Zion’s cemetery. That may be the reason the two Cordier children are also buried there, buried in the same cemetery as their grandparents.

In 1900 the Cordier family resided on West Pearl Street in Rockford, Ohio. Henry was a physician and they had the following children: Myrtle C, 14; Luella E, 10; Luetta L, 10; and Alberta B, 7. Note that they had twin daughters. This enumeration indicates that Louisa had given birth to five children, but only four were living.  [5] However, another son is also buried in Zion Chatt’s cemetery.

By 1910 Henry and Louisa had moved to Celina, where Henry was still a practicing physician. They lived at 121 Market Street with their four daughters, Myrtle, Luella, Luetta, and Alberta. In this record Louisa indicated that she had given birth to six children, with four still living. Henry indicated that his father was born in Germany and his mother in Switzerland. [6]

Henry returned to Liberty Township by 1920, where he was still a doctor, but his wife and daughters were not living with him. [7] They were in Louisiana.

Wife Louisa and their three daughters were living in Tangipahoa, Louisiana. Louisa, Alberta, and Luella were living with Luetta (Cordier) Thompson and her daughter Barbara. [8] Luetta had married Orland Thompson in 1916. [9]  

By 1928 Henry and Louise were back together and were living in Denver, Colorado. [10]

Henry and Louisa were living with their daughter Alberta in Denver in 1930. Alberta was age 37, unmarried, and employed as a secretary at a public school. Henry was 78 years old and Louisa was 66. Henry was not working and had likely retired by this time. [11]

Henry Cordier died in 1933 and is buried at Wheat Ridge Cemetery, Jefferson County, Colorado. [12]

Henry’s widow Louisa likely remained with their daughter Alberta in Denver until she died in 1945. Louisa is also buried at Wheat Ridge Cemetery. [13]

 

 

[1] On 28 March1880 Heinrich J. Cordier, along with Magdalena Kessler, were witnesses to the baptism of Gustov Heinrich Wuethner, son of Gustav and Friederike Wuethner. The other Cordier mentioned was Katherina Cordier, who was confirmed at Zion Chatt in 1873.

[2] Frank/Nitta/Hammond/Schmidt Ancestry Tree, submitted by veefrank, listing for Henry J Cordier; Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 Jul 2015).

[3] 1880 U.S. Census, Liberty, Mercer, Ohio, ED 188 p.471B, dwelling & family 9, line 2, Henry J Cordier, in the home of Jacob Deitsch; digital image by subscription at Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 Jul 2015); from FHL microfilm 1255048, from NARA microfilm T9, roll 1048.

[4] Michigan Marriage Records, 1867-1952, Michigan Department of Community Health, Division for Vital Records and Health Statistics, 1882 Monroe-1883 Benzie, p.308 Henry J Cordier and Louisa Deitsch, 4 Jan 1882; database and images on-line at Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 July 2015).

[5] 1900 U.S. Census, Dublin, Mercer, Ohio, ED 78, p.3A, dwelling 58, family 59, Henry J Cordier; digital image by subscription at Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 Jul 2015); from FHL microfilm 1241303, from NARA microfilm T623, roll 1303.

[6] 1910 U.S. Census, Celina Ward 2, Mercer, Ohio, ED 117, p.12B, dwelling 118, family 123, Henry J Cordier; digital image by subscription at Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 Jul 2015); from FHL microfilm 1375227, from NARA microfilm T624, roll 1214.

[7] 1920 U.S. Census, Liberty, Mercer, Ohio, ED 140, p.3A, dwelling 47, family 47, Henry J. Cordier; digital image by subscription at Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 Jul 2015); from NARA microfilm T625, roll 1418.

[8] 1920, Hammond, Tangipahoa, Louisiana, ED 128, p.19A, dwelling 346, line 43, Louisa Cordier; digital image by subscription at Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 Jul 2015); from NARA microfilm T625, roll 631.

[9] “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 27 Jul 2015), Henry J. Cordier in entry for Orland Thompson and Louetta Cordier, 15 Jul 1916; citing Mercer County, Ohio, Marriages, Vol. 11 p.46; from FHL microfilm 2366954.

[10] U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989, 1928 Denver, Colorado City Directory, p.846, Henry J & spouse Louise B Cordier; database and images on-line at Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 July 2015).

[11] 1930 U.S. Census, Denver, Denver, Colorado, ED 67, p.16B, dwelling 336, family 343, Henry J Cordier; digital image by subscription at Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 Jul 2015); from FHL microfilm 1339970, from NARA microfilm T626, roll 2356.

[12] Find a Grave (www.findagrave.com : accessed 27 Jul 2015), Henry J Cordier & Louisa B Cordier memorials, #43516013 & 104623665.

[13] 1940 U.S. Census, Denver, Denver, Colorado, ED 16-220B, p.1A, line 29, visit 14, Louisa B. Cordier; digital image by subscription at Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 Jul 2015); from NARA microfilm T627, roll 490.

Jul 24

Louis Schumm’s Aermotor Windmill

I enjoy seeing old farm windmills, so it is a treat to have an old photo that shows a windmill. And even better when my ancestors are in the photo, too.

Aermotor windmill on Louis Schumm farm, 1901. L to R: Mrs. Don Eicher, Sarah (Breuninger) Schumm, Frieda Schumm, Louis J. Schumm, Cornelius Schumm, Mr. Dellinger.

Aermotor Windmill on Louis Schumm farm, 1901. L to R: Mrs. Don Eicher, Sarah (Breuninger) Schumm, Frieda Schumm, Louis J. Schumm, Cornelius Schumm, Mr. Dellinger.

This is an interesting family photo of what was probably a big event for the Louis Schumm family in 1901–the raising of a big, shiny, new Aermotor Windmill.

In this photo, left to right, beginning with the women in back: Mrs. Don Eicher, Sarah (Breuninger) Schumm, Frieda Schumm, Louis J. Schumm, Cornelius Schumm, Mr. Dellinger.

The little boy in the photo is Cornelius Schumm (1896-1986), who was my grandfather. His parents were Louis J and Sarah (Breuninger) Schumm. This photo is also special because it is one of only a couple photos I have of my great-grandmother Sarah, who died in 1921. Frieda Schumm, who eventually married Richard Allmandinger, was Cornelius’ sister.

The above photo was taken at the Louis Schumm farm on Willshire-Eastern Road, east of Willshire. Their home is visible in the background and their water-pumping windmill was erected in the barnyard, between the house and the barn. The large round container the women are standing in front of is the water tank, to hold water drawn up by the windmill.

Their banked barn was built in 1886. The windmill and water tank are to the right in the 1905 photo below. You can just barely make out the windmill but the water tank is easy to see.

Louis Schumm barn with water tank and windmill on the right. Cornelius, Freida, and Louis J Schumm, 1905.

Louis Schumm barn with water tank and windmill on the right. Cornelius, Freida, and Louis J Schumm, 1905.

The photo of my mother (below) was taken about 40 years later and you can see the windmill and the water tank in the background. I assume this was the same Aermotor Windmill and it looks like the same water tank.

Florence Schumm with windmill and water tank in background. c1944.

Florence Schumm with windmill and water tank in background. c1944.

Just about every farm had a windmill years ago. The windmill on the Carl Miller farm was located between the barn and granary.

Windmill on Miller farm, Mercer County, Ohio. Unknown date.

Windmill on Miller farm, Mercer County, Ohio. Unknown date.

I still see windmills on farms today, in all sorts of disrepair. Windmills are still used on Amish farms, while others that have not been used for decades are falling apart.

In the 1901 Schumm photo you can clearly see “The Aermotor Co, Chicago” written on the vane of the windmill. Aermotor was, and still is, an American manufacturer of wind-powered water pumps, pumping water by using the power of the wind.

Today the Aermotor Company describes their device as the lowest cost pumping power on Earth. It “puts the wind to work, saving fuel and money, with virtually no maintenance.” Their windmills are used today to pump water for livestock, pond water replacement, and other purposes.

The Aermotor windmill was developed by Thomas O. Perry in the late 1880s and the first one was sold in 1888. Only 24 Aermotor windmills were sold that first year but they had an edge on their competitors—the Aermotor had a much greater lifting power and was able to do more work than the larger wooden windmills. Theirs quickly became popular and they sold 20,000 in 1892.

By 1904, three years after the Schumm windmill was purchased, Aermotor had a catalog with a wide range of accessories, hand pumps, wood and metal tanks, equipment for the mills such as feed cutters, power saws, corn shellers and other specialty items. By mass-producing they were able to reduce the price of their windmills. An 8 foot diameter windmill cost about $25 and a 20 foot one cost about $300 back then.

During WWII they became a subcontractor for Bell & Howell and built precision lens mounts for the top- secret Norden Bombsight.

The Aermotor Company was bought and sold several times during the next few decades. From 1969-1980 the windmills were produced in Argentina but by 1980 they were once again manufactured in the United States.

In 2006 the company was purchased by a private group of ranchers who restored the original 1888 name to The Aermotor Company. All parts of the windmill are made in the United States and they come with a 7-year warranty.

The company currently operates out of San Angelo, Texas. They produce windmills from 6 to 16 feet in diameter, as well as the metal windmill towers, the pump assembly, and other components. All made right here in the United States and distributed worldwide.

 

Sources of information:

Aermotor Windmill Company  

Wikipedia, Aermotor Windmill Company

Jul 21

Tombstone Tuesday–Ida R. Heffner

Ida R. Heffner, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

Ida R. Heffner, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Ida R. Heffner, located in row 7 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

Ida R. Heffner
Apr. 14, 1880
Sept. 5, 1880

Ida was the first child born to George Heinrich and Lucinda (Karch) Heffner, born in Jefferson Township, Mercer County, Ohio, on 14 April 1880. [1] She died of brain fever in Celina on 4 or 5 September 1880, at the age of 5 months. [2]

Ida’s name was written as J.R.C. Heffner on both her probate birth and death records. Her year of birth looks like it was changed to or from 1880 to 1881 on the probate record, but the year has to be 1880 since she died in September 1880. Her death record indicates she died on the 4th but her cemetery marker indicates she died on the 5th. Her death record also indicates she was born in Celina.

Her parents, George Heffner and Lucinda Karch Heffner, were married at Zion Chatt on 14 September 1879. Their marriage is recorded at Zion as well as in the Mercer County probate records. [3]

There is no birth, baptism, or death record for Ida in Zion Chatt’s records and George and Lucinda are not mentioned in Zion’s records after their 1879 marriage.

I have not located George and Lucinda in the 1880 census but in the 1900 census Lucinda indicated that she had given birth to four children, but that only three were living. Their other three children were Edward S., Ralph Rufus, and Frank Clarence. [4]

Ida’s father George Heinrich Heffner was the son of Conrad and Margaretha (Miller) Heffner, born in Mercer County, Ohio, 21 Jul 1857, and died in Mercer County 3 July 1928. [5]

Ida’s mother Lucinda (Karch) Heffner was the daughter of George and Walburga (Riddle/Riedel) Karch, born 12 December 1860 in Marysville, Ohio, and died 17 April 1945 in Mercer County. [6]

George and Lucinda are both buried in the North Grove mausoleum, Celina.

 

[1] “Ohio, County Births, 1841-2003,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 18 Jul 2015), J.R.C. Heffner, 14 Apr 1881; from Jefferson Township, Mercer County, Ohio Births, Vol. 1, p.328-9; from FHL microfilm 914953. Note: Her birth year is incorrect in this index. It should be 1880.

[2] “Ohio, County Death Records, 1840-2001,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 18 Jul 2015), J.R. C. Heffner, 4 Sep 1880; Celina, Jefferson Township, citing Mercer County, Ohio, Death records, Vol. 1-2, p.162-3; from FHL microfilm 914954.

[3] “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 18 Jul 2015), George H. Hoeffner and Lucinda Karch, 14 Sep 1879; citing Mercer, Ohio, Marriages, Vol. 4, p.141; from FHL microfilm 914956.

[4] 1900 U.S. Census, Celina, Mercer, Ohio, ED84, p.4A, dwelling 78, family 79, George H. Heffner; digital images by subscription Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 Jul 2015); from FHL microfilm 12413045, from NARA microfilm T623, roll 1304.

[5] “Ohio, Deaths, 1908-1953,” database with images, (https://familysearch.org : accessed 18 Jul 2015), George Henry Heffner, 3 Jul 1928; from FHL microfilm 1991346. Note: George’s birth year is transcribed incorrectly in this index. What was transcribed as a 9 is actually a 7; the top of the 5 appears to make the 7 a 9.

[6] “Ohio, Deaths, 1908-1953,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 18 Jul 2015), Lucinda Heffner, 17 Apr 1945; citing reference certificate; from FHL microfilm 2372782.

Jul 17

Summer is for Baseball

Warning. This blog post has nothing at all to do with genealogy. I try to be well-rounded and I do have a few other interests beside genealogy. Baseball happens to be one of them. Specifically, watching Cincinnati Reds baseball. I don’t play baseball. I have never been that athletic and I am too old at this point to try.

This has been a fun baseball week. It was the All Star break–a time-out from the regular season, which has been a somewhat less than mediocre season for the Reds.

This past Monday was the Home Run Derby and Tuesday was the All Star Game, both held this year at the Great American Ballpark in Cincinnati.

We helped put our favorite Reds’ player, Todd Frazier, on the All Star roster by voting for him numerous times. I guess it helped because he came from behind, trailing over 2 million votes a couple weeks ago, to win the starting 3rd baseman position in the 2015 All Star Game.

Frazier, aka ToddFather, aka King of Swing after Monday night’s performance, has been our favorite player since Cincinnati drafted him in 2011. We followed him back then and Joe recognized him walking on a sidewalk near the Great American Ball Park back in June of 2012. That was his rookie year and he may have been going to the ballpark for batting practice, but he was kind enough to stop and talk with two old folks for a couple minutes and even allowed Joe to snap a photo.

This gives me another opportunity to show off the photo below, just in case someone missed it before.

Todd Frazier, Reds' 3rd baseman, and Karen. (2012 photo)

Todd Frazier, Reds’ 3rd baseman, and Karen. (2012 photo)

I usually carry a hard copy of this photo wherever I go, showing it to anyone who shows a remote interest in baseball. At first, during Frazier’s rookie year, people did not always recognize him in the photo, but people recognize him now! Maybe someday I will get it autographed.

So this past week was pretty exciting, with Frazier participating in not only the All Star Game but in the Home Run Derby on Monday night.

Last year Frazier was the runner up in the derby and this year he started out as second seed since he is one of the leading home run hitters in MLB this year.

The whole format of the Home Run Derby was revamped this year and I must say it was the most exciting sporting event I have seen since the Buckeyes won the National Championship last January.

It was an exciting, nail-biting, edge-of-your-seat event and, best of all, Frazier won. The crowd, made up mainly of Reds fans, was on its feet, cheering him on at every opportunity. How wonderful that a player from the host team won the Home Run Derby.

Ah, to have been there and to have been a part of the cheering crowd, the excitement, and the drama. Darn. We should have bought tickets for the event months ago. Oh well. We had good seats right here at home.

Meanwhile, we had our own drama going on here at the house. Immediately after Frazier hit the home run to beat his second opponent Josh Donaldson, a big thunderstorm came through here. We did not lose power but the storm blocked our TV satellite transmission and the TV went out. That storm needed to pass through quickly, not only so we could see the end of the home run competition, but because we really didn’t need any more rain here. Our lawn was already super-saturated, and then some.

A co-worker, who is also a fellow Reds fan, and I had been texting back and forth about t how well Frazier was doing and how exciting the whole event was. She still had TV reception but within five minutes the storm reached Rockford and her TV went out, too. We were both getting nervous, not wanting to miss a single minute of the show.

Our TV came on about ten minutes later and I was able to text her with the results of the next match-up, the winner of which would be up against Frazier in the final round.

Thankfully there were enough commercial breaks to stretch out the Home Run Derby and we both had TV reception by the time the final match between Frazier and Pederson came on. Frazier hit 15 home runs to beat Joc Pederson and he hit a total of 39 home runs Monday evening.

After Monday night’s power-hitting event the All Star Game was a little anticlimactic and unfortunately Frazier was all out of home runs by that time. Before the game they honored and introduced some of the legendary baseball greats. When I was a kid my favorite player was Sandy Koufax and he, along with Hank Aaron, Johnny Bench, and Willie Mays, were honored in person, on the field, right there in Cincinnati. Koufax even threw out the first pitch to Johnny Bench. Wow!

That would have been awesome to see in person.

Below is proof positive that we have been Frazier fans since he started with the Reds. We special ordered our shirts during Frazier’s rookie year, before they ever made and sold a Reds shirt with his name on it. His name and number were ironed on our shirts.

P1020445I wonder when Cincinnati will host another All Star Game. Maybe we will go to that one…

 

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