Nov 07

I Voted in Honor of a Veteran

One week separates two important events this year—Election Day and Veterans Day. Although Election Day has passed there is a program here in Ohio that is still worth mentioning.

Ohio’s Secretary of State Jon Husted has created a program linking the two events, where we can honor our veterans while encouraging people to vote at the same time. A program where you can honor a veteran with your vote–Vote in Honor of a Veteran.

A great idea because veterans have fought for and are prepared to fight for our freedoms, one of which is our right to vote.

Vote in Honor of a Veteran is sponsored by the Office of the Ohio Secretary of State. The program was created to “recognize the service of our brave veterans and provide encouragement to our citizens to vote…”

As they describe it on their website, http://www.sos.state.oh.us/omv/VIHOV.aspx :

“Anyone who has a family member, friend or neighbor in the armed services understands the unwavering dedication and patriotism of these men and women. Through the Vote in Honor of a Veteran initiative, you can demonstrate the pride you feel for an individual veteran and, at the same time, encourage others to exercise one of our most sacred rights we have when you go to the polls on Election Day. [1]

The program is free. To pay tribute to a veteran you just provide some information about his/her military service and a brief testimonial about the veteran. If you wish you can submit a photo of the veteran. The veteran’s tribute and photo may be displayed on the website in the list of Honored Veterans.

To participate you can apply on their website [1]; or print out a card from their website, complete it and mail it to them; or call 877-sos-ohio .

After they receive the above information you will receive a nice Vote in Honor of a Veteran lapel pin. On the card that came with the pin:

Thank you for supporting the brave men and women of our armed forces. This pin is a tribute to our veterans who serve to protect the freedom and democracy we enjoy as American citizens. This pin also symbolizes the importance of voting as one of our most sacred rights, a right we enjoy as a direct result of the commitment, dedication and sacrifice made by the members of our armed forces. When you wear this pin, you not only honor the courageous work of our veterans, but you encourage others to vote on Election Day.

Vote in Honor of a Veteran, from Ohio Secretary of State.

Vote in Honor of a Veteran pin from Ohio Secretary of State.

I honored my dad on their website and you can see the tribute by going to the website [link above], click on the Read Testimonials link, and type Miller in the Find a Veteran search field.

I wore my Vote in Honor of a Veteran pin when I voted last Tuesday and then wore it at work, where several people asked about it. Although this year’s mid-term elections are over you can still pay tribute to a veteran in this program and wear the pin on the next Election Day.

This coming Tuesday is Veterans Day. Veterans Day was originally called Armistice Day, named to commemorate of the end of World War I. Fighting between the Allied nations and Germany was ceased on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918. That date is generally regarded as the end of “the war to end all wars.” Armistice Day was originally observed with parades, speeches, and a brief suspension of businesses beginning at 11:00 a.m.

It was made a legal holiday in 1938. The day was to be dedicated to the cause of world peace and was primarily to honor veterans of World War I. After World War II and the Korean War the word “Veterans” replaced the word “Armistice” and the holiday has been known as Veterans Day ever since. On 1 June 1954, Veterans Day became a day to honor American veterans of all wars.

Herb Miller, U.S. Army veteran, WWII.

Herb Miller, U.S. Army veteran, WWII.

There are several veterans in my close family. My dad, his two brothers Laverne and Kenny, and my cousin Ron Weitz are my closest veteran relatives. Joe’s brother Greg was also veteran.

A list of some of the veterans in my family is on Karen’s Chatt’s home page, in the MILITARY drop-down.

This coming Tuesday, on Veterans Day, I will remember my dad’s service to our country and the fact that that he never missed an opportunity to vote in an election.

[1] Vote in Honor of a Veteran, Jon Husted, Ohio Secretary of State, http://www.sos.state.oh.us/omv/VIHOV.aspx .

Nov 04

Tombstone Tuesday–Philip & Philipina (Fickert) Emrich

Philip & Philimena Emrich, Kessler Cemetery, Mercer County, Ohio. (2014 photo by Karen)

Philip & Philimena Emrich, Kessler Cemetery, Mercer County, Ohio. (2014 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Philip and Philipina (Fickert) Emrich, located in row 8 of Kessler, aka Liberty Cemetery, Mercer County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

EMRICH
Philipina
1865-1934
Philip
1849-1896

Note that this surname is spelled several different ways in various records: Emrich, Emerich, Emrick, Emerick, and Emmerich being the most common variations. In this post I am spelling it the way it was written on their tombstone.

Philip Emrich was born 9 April 1849, as calculated from his death record. He was born in Germany, one of two children born to Philip and Margaretha Emrich. Both of the Emrich children were deceased by 1900. The Emrich family immigrated in about 1865. [1]

Philip Emrich married Philipina Fickert in 1884 in Kentucky.

Philip and Philipina [sometimes spelled Phelebena] applied for a marriage license in Mercer County, Ohio, on 1 November 1884, but the marriage was denied. The Ohio marriage license required that a couple be no closer relation than second cousins. Hand-written on their marriage license: This marriage license is canceled Nov. 5, 1884. License returned on discovery that the Parties being first cousins. [2]

Mercer County, Ohio, marriage license Philip Emrich & Philipina Fickert, canceled.

Mercer County, Ohio, marriage license Philip Emrich & Philipina Fickert, canceled.

So Philip and Philipina went to Kentucky and were married 11 November 1884 at St. Paul’s Evangelical church in Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky. [3] [4]

The couple set up housekeeping in Liberty Township, Mercer County, where Philip farmed. It appears both Philip Emrich Jr and Sr owned land south of Chatt. In 1888 one owned 80 acres on the southeast corner of State Route 49 and Schaadt Road. The other owned 40 acres on Oregon Road, east of route 49, between Linn Road and Wabash Road. By 1900 the land on Oregon Road was owned by someone else and Philip Sr. owned land north of the Emrich 80 acres on Route 49 and Schaadt Road.

Philip and Philipina Emrich had eight children:

Mary Magdalena (1885-?), married William A. Thompson
Wilhelmina “Minnie” (1887-1942), married Frederick Schott
Johann Friedrich (1888-1910)
Catherina P. (1889-1890)
Franz Heinrich (1891-1976), married Eva Maltby
Lydia (1892-1929), married Elmer C. Baker
Elizabeth “Lizzie” Rebecka (1894-?), married Marshall Long Jr
Philip Peter (1896-1991), married Esther Suhr

Philip died of typhoid fever at his home in Liberty Township on 12 January 1896, at the age of 46 years, 9 months, and 3 days. He died about a month before their son Philip Peter was born. [5]

In 1900 Philipine (Fickert) Emrich was living with six of their seven surviving children on their farm in Liberty Township. Their eldest daughter was living elsewhere. This census also indicates that Philipine had given birth to eight children and seven were still living. [6]

By 1910 Philipine was residing at the Toledo State Hospital, Lucas County, Ohio. She remained there until she died of heart disease on 26 November 1934. She was 69 years old, a widowed housewife. She was buried 26 November in Kessler Cemetery. Her name was written as Phelebena on her death certificate. [7]

 

[1] 1900 U.S. Census, Liberty Township, Mercer County, Ohio, ED 85, p.9A, dwelling 168, family 173, Margret Emrich; Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 2 November 2014); from FHL microfilm 1241304, from NARA microfilm T623 roll 1304.

[2] “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-1997,: index and images, FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org : accessed 1 November 2014), Philip Emerich or Emrich and Philipina Fickert, 1 November 1884; citing Mercer, Ohio marriages Vol. 5, p. 278; from FHL microfilm 914956.

[3] “Kentucky Marriages, 1785-1979,” index, FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org : accessed 1 November 2014), Philip Emrich and Philaphina Fickert, 11 November 1884; from FHL microfilm 588892.

[4] “Kentucky Marriages, 1785-1979,” index, FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org : accessed 1 November 2014), Philip Emrich and Philaphina Fickert, 11 November 1884; St. Paul’s Evangelical Church, Louisville, Jefferson, Kentucky, reference ; from FHL microfilm 1531413.

[5] “Ohio, county Death Records, 1840-2001,” index and images, FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org ; accessed 1 November 2014), Philip Emrick, 12 January 1896; citing Records of Probate Deaths in Mercer County Ohio, Vol. 1-2, unpaginated; from FHL microfilm 914954. [This record gives his age as 76 years, 9 months, and 3 days.]

[6] 1900 U.S. Census, Liberty Township, Mercer County, Ohio, ED 85, p.9B, dwelling 178, family 183, Ben Emerick; Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 2 November 2014); from FHL microfilm 1241304, from NARA microfilm T623 roll 1304.

[7] “Ohio, Deaths, 1908-1953,” index and images, FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org : accessed 1 November 2014), Phelebena Emerich, 26 November 1934; citing Toledo, Lucas, Ohio, reference fn 67781; from FHL microfilm 2022231.

Oct 31

Happy Halloween!

Everyone likes to dress up for Trick or Treat and the students at Zion Lutheran Schumm’s parochial school were no exception.

Shown below are parochial school students in 1943. Their teacher Gordon Mackenson was the only one not wearing a costume. It would be difficult to guess just who was behind those masks. Actually, one of them was my mom but she’s not telling which one she was.

Halloween, Zion Lutheran Schumm Parochial School.

Halloween, Zion Lutheran Schumm parochial school, 1943.

Roasting hot dogs has always been a favorite autumn activity, too. These children from Schumm have their roasting sticks all ready to go.

Getting ready to roast hotdogs, 1938 Schumm, with Rev. Moeller.

Schumm parochial school with Rev. Moeller, 1938.

In the above photo, left to right, front: Jr. Roehm, ? , Amy Schumm, ?, Henrietta Moeller, ?, William Allmandinger, Virginia Schumm; back: Florence Schumm, Ellen Schumm, Elmer Schumm, Louis Allmandinger, Hildegard Schumm, Lois Schumm, Helen Schumm, Betty Baker, and Roman Schumm.

Roasting hotdogs by the parochial school at Schumm with Rev. Moeller, 1939:

At Schumm Parochial School with Rev. Moeller. 1939.

At Schumm Parochial School with Rev. Moeller. 1939.

Roasting hotdogs in 1940:

Hotdog roast at Schumm Parochial School, with Rev. Moeller. Unknown date.

. Schumm parochial school with Rev. Moeller. 1940.

When I was a teenager our Luther League at Zion Chatt usually celebrated Halloween with a hayride followed by a bonfire and hotdog roast at the church. We rode in the back of a flatbed wagon filled with lots of itchy hay. The wagon was pulled by a tractor or truck and we meandered our way around the back roads of Ohio and Indiana near Chattanooga. We had a good time, but to paraphrase one of Joe’s favorite sayings, “it’s fun until someone pokes out a windshield.” [Some of you may remember the incident I am referring to.]

One year Fern and Kermit Stetler hosted the Luther League’s Halloween party in their barn. They had the usual games that included bobbing for apples and sticking your hands in cooked spaghetti that was supposed to feel like brains.

Last week we toured the Adams County Museum in Decatur, Indiana. We had never been in their museum and we enjoyed going through the mansion which was all decorated for the holiday.

Museum at Adams County, Indiana.

Museum at Adams County, Indiana.

IMG_20141024_175738_798This poor gal has been waiting a long time to get married.

IMG_20141024_182710_137I remember using a dental unit just like this one. It certainly looks dreadful today! Now that is scary!

Old dental equipment, Adams County, Indiana, Museum.

Old dental equipment, Adams County, Indiana, Museum.

Have a Spook-tacular Halloween!

 

Oct 28

Tombstone Tuesday–Ray A. Schott

Ray A. Schott, Decatur Cemetery, Adams County, Indiana. (2014 photo by Karen)

Ray A. Schott, Decatur Cemetery, Adams County, Indiana. (2014 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Ray Albert Schott, located in Decatur Cemetery, Decatur, Adams County, Indiana. The marker is inscribed:

SCHOTT
Ray A Schott
PFC US Army
World War II
Apr 3, 1919 – Apr 15, 1993
Our Dad   Fredrick, Linda, and Rebecca

The reverse side of the monument is inscribed:

SCHOTT
Alice Anna (Cook)
Feb. 1, 1918 – Feb. 24, 1998
Our Mother  Fredrick, Linda, Rebecca, and Tamila

Alice Anna (Cook) Schott, Decatur Cemetery, Adams County, Indiana. (2014 photo by Karen)

Alice Anna (Cook) Schott, Decatur Cemetery, Adams County, Indiana. (2014 photo by Karen)

Ray Albert Schott was born in Chattanooga, Ohio, on 3 April 1919 to Fredrick and Minnie (Emerich) Schott. He was baptized at Zion Chatt on 18 May 1919 with Otto and Maggie Bollenbacher as his sponsors. Ray was confirmed at Zion on 4 June 1933 by Rev. Carl Yahl.

Zion Chatt's 1933 Confirmation Class, front, L to R: Ruth Miller, Lois Heffner, Rev. Carl Yahl, Imogene Reef, Naomi Reef. back: Ray Schott, Carl Hunziker, Vernon Becher, Leroy Bollenbacher.

Zion Chatt’s 1933 Confirmation Class, L to R, front: Ruth Miller, Lois Heffner, Rev. Carl Yahl, Imogene Reef, Naomi Reef. back: Ray Schott, Carl Hunziker, Vernon Becher, Leroy Bollenbacher.

Ray Schott and Alice Anna Cook were married 21 July 1938 in Adams County, Indiana, by Rev. J.S. Hoenstine of Columbia City, Indiana. Alice was born 1 February 1918 in Adams County, the daughter of Henry and Ona May (Durbin) Cook. [1]

When they married Ray was living in Decatur and Alice in rural Decatur. Ray’s occupation was a soy bean employee, so he may have worked at Central Soya in Decatur. Ray gave his birth year as 1916 on his marriage license application, possibly so he would be considered over the age of 21. [1]

In 1940 the couple lived in a rented home in Monroe, Adams County, Indiana. Their son Fredrick D. was one year old, born in Indiana. Ray sewed sacks at a feed mill. [2]

According to Ray Schott’s obituary, he died at his home in Fort Wayne at the age of 74. It noted that he was a native of Chattanooga, Ohio, a WWII veteran, and a retiree of Wayne Pump Company. He was survived by children Rebecca Smith of Fort Wayne, Linda Grote of Decatur, and Fred of Michigan City; sisters Ruth Edwards of Monroe, Indiana, Irene Herron of St. Henry, Ohio, and Annalee Schlechte of Dallas; brothers Paul of New Bremen, Ohio, Dale of Fort Wayne, and Alfred of Rockford, Ohio; nine grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Private services were held at Haggard & Armes Funeral Home, Decatur. He was buried with military honors in Decatur Cemetery. [3]

According to Alice A. Schott’s obituary, she died at Lutheran Hospital in Fort Wayne at the age of 80. She was retired from Franklin Electric Company. She was survived by son Fredrick L. of Westville; daughters Linda Grote, Rebecca A. Smith, Tamila S. Maple, all of Decatur; a brother Gerald Cook of Monroe; two sisters, Esther Ehrsam of Berne and Neva Workinger of Monroe; 14 grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren. Haggard & Sefton Funeral Home was in charge of the services and she was buried at Decatur Cemetery. [4]

Decatur Cemetery is also known as Greenwood Cemetery and Maplewood Cemetery. It is located on the west side of Decatur, a few blocks west of route 27 and between route 224 and West Monroe Street.

[1] “Indiana, Marriages, 1811-1959,” index and images, FamilySearch.org (www.familysearch.org : accessed 25 October 2014), Ray A. Schott and Alice A. Cook, 21 July 1938; citing Adams County; FHL microfilm 002321633.

[2] 1940 U.S. Census, Monroe, Monroe Township, Adams County, Indiana, ED 1-7, p. 1A, family 9, Ray Schott; FamilySearch.org (www.FamilySearch.org : accessed 25 October 2014); from NARA microfilm T627, roll 1024.

[3] The News-Sentinel, Fort Wayne, Indiana, Friday 16 April 1993, p.6A, Genealogy Bank.com (www.genealogybank.com : accessed 25 October 2014).

[4] The Journal Gazette, Fort Wayne, Indiana, Thursday 26 February 1998, p. 3C, Genealogy Bank.com (www.genealogybank.com : accessed 25 October 2014).

Oct 24

One That Got Away–Seeking Information about Schumm

I mentioned last week that I regularly follow Ebay auctions in search of old postcards from the area. Recently there was a very interesting postcard up for auction–a picture postcard of Schumm, Ohio, as it was about 100 years ago. It was a photo of a large brick building by the railroad tracks that were once on the north end of the village.

I tried to get the postcard, but sadly I was outbid. That was difficult for me because I usually get what I want. ;)

More than anything, I wanted the postcard so I could put the photo image here on Karen’s Chatt, with the hope of getting some information about that old brick building.

Schumm, Ohio. The area in the background is near the location of the brick building. (2014 photo by Karen)

Schumm, Ohio. The area in the background is near the location of the brick building. (2014 photo by Karen)

I never realized Schumm had a building like that in its downtown area. My mother does not ever remember such a building in Schumm, so it was probably gone by the late 1930s.

The railroad track ran right by the side of the building. On this side of the track was a sign with SCHUMM and on either side of the name SCHUMM was TOLEDO 96 and ST LOUIS 355, the distance both cities are from Schumm.

Schumm Road, which crossed the railroad tracks and went in front of the building, was not paved in the photo. There was a railroad crossing danger sign with LOOK & LISTEN painted on its post. Also in the area near the tracks was a friendly KEEP OFF sign.

I am fairly certain the brick building was south of the train tracks and on the west side of Schumm Road. There was a frame building on the far side of the brick building and a small building to the back. The small building may have been an outhouse or shed.

The building was a two-story brick structure that looks like it was occupied by two businesses. There were four tall windows on the front and probably two doors–what looks like two store-fronts. There were four long windows across the front on the second story. The side of the building was long, east and west, with a bay area in the middle. There were a couple side doors and about a few second story windows on the side.

Since I did not get the postcard I cannot post the image here. But I can direct you to the Ebay auction page and you can still view it by using the link below:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/RPPC-REAL-PHOTO-POSTCARD-RAILROAD-CROSSING-SCHUMM-OHIO-VAN-WERT-COUNTY-WILLSHIRE-/371163562329?nma=true&si=AuHGDd8gKeFXtHBvCtX8tkdsqbg%253D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557

When you get to the Ebay page the postcard should be the first thing you see. If not, you may have scroll down a little to see it. You can even zoom in on it in order to see the details. I do not know how long the image will stay on Ebay since the auction is over. So I would advise you look at it now. ASAP.

What was this brick building used for? Were there stores in the building? Perhaps one was a hardware store or a general store. Who built and owned the building? What happened to it and when was it torn down?

Thanks to Wikipedia I found a brief history of the railroad that ran through Schumm years ago. This information gives me an idea of when the building stood in Schumm.

The TStL&W Railroad (Toledo, St. Louis & Western) likely ran through Schumm when the photo was taken. The TStL&W began as the Toledo, Cincinnati, and St. Louis Railroad in 1881 and connected the Ohio towns of Toledo and Cincinnati with St. Louis, Missouri. By 1886 the company dropped Cincinnati and became the Toledo, St. Louis, and Kansas City Railroad. In 1900 the company reorganized again to form the Toledo, St. Louis and Western Railroad, operating 450 miles of line between Toledo and St. Louis. The Clover Leaf, as the TStL&W was also called, became part of the Nickel Plate (New York, Chicago, and St. Louis RR) in 1922 and would eventually became part of the Norfolk Southern RR. [1]

Where the railroad tracks once ran east from Schumm. (2014 photo by Karen)

Where the railroad tracks once ran east from Schumm. (2014 photo by Karen)

The TStL&W Railroad ran east from St. Louis, through several states, through Willshire, Schumm, Dull, Ohio City, and other Ohio towns on its way to Toledo. This is shown on the map below, a portion of a 1914 Ohio railroad map.  [2]

1914 Railroad map of northwest Ohio.

1914 Railroad map of northwest Ohio.

Because the Schumm sign that was located by the railroad tracks indicated the distance Toledo and St. Louis were from the village, I believe the photo was taken during the time of the TStL&W Railroad. And likely taken between 1900 and 1922.

I would love to hear from anyone who knows anything about this brick building that once stood in Schumm.

Even though I did not get the photo postcard, it could still turn out to be a source of information about Schumm.

 

[1] Toledo, St. Louis and Western Railroad, Wikipedia.org, (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toledo,_St._Louis_and_Western_Railroad : accessed 22 October 2014).
[2] Ohio Public Utilities Commission 1914 Railroad Map of Ohio, Rails and Trails.com (http://www.railsandtrails.com/Maps/OhioRRCommission/1914/index.html : accessed 24 October 2014).

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