Nov 28

Tombstone Tuesday–Wilbur Clarence Brandt

Wilbur Clarence Brandt, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Wilbur Clarence Brandt, located in row 8 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

Wilbur C, Son Of
O.A. & E.R Brandt
Died Nov. 8, 1914
Aged 5 Y.
1 M.  25 D.

Wilbur Clarence Brandt was born 14 September 1909 in Blackcreek Township, Mercer County, Ohio.  He was the son of Otto (1874-1952) and Eva (Wise) (1879-1958) Brandt. Wilbur was baptized at Zion Chatt on 3 October 1909 with his uncle Clarence Brandt serving as his sponsor.

Wilbur was enumerated in only one census, the 1910 census, when he was less than a year old. In the Brandt household in 1910: Otto A, 36; Eva R, 34; Ester M, 5; Carl L, 3; Wilbur C, 0; and William Riches, 20. The family lived on what was called Brandt Pike, south of Willshire in Blackcreek Township, and Otto was a farmer. [1]

Wilbur Brandt died of an epileptic convulsion in Blackcreek Township on 8 November 1914 at the age of 5 years, 1 month, and 24 days. He was buried on the 10th. Rev. Gahre in charge of the service and S.S. Buchanan, Willshire, was in charge of the arrangements. [2] According to Zion Chatt’s records Wilbur was survived by his parents, brothers, sisters, and relatives of the Otto Brandt.

Wilbur Brandt had the following siblings:
Esther Laura Maria (1905-2000), married Omer M. Havens
Carl Louis (1906-2000), married Mabel Emely Morrison [3]
Bernice May (1912-2008), married Charles W. Shell
Herbert Wilson (1914-2014), married Anna Fahncke
Miriam Louisa (1918-2003), married Dean V. Baughman

 

[1] 1910 U.S. census, Black Creek, Mercer, Ohio, ED 107, p.8B, dwelling 178, family 179, Otta A Brandt; Ancestry.com; FHL microfilm 1375227, NARA microfilm T624, roll 1214.

[2] “Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953,” database with images, FamilySearch, Wilber C Brandt, 8 Nov 1914; Mercer County; file no. 62078; FHL microfilm 1983285.

[3] Carl’s name is shown as Carl Arthur in his baptism record at Zion Chatt, but as Carl Louis on his tombstone.

 

Nov 24

Dear Mom & All–WWII Letters from Herb (part 7)

Here are some more letters that my dad, Herbert Miller, wrote home during his basic training at Fort McClellan, Alabama, during the summer of 1944. During that time he was in Company A, 12th Battalion, 8th Regiment. He mentions some of his siblings in the letters: Ruth, Em, Helen, Kenny, and Vernie. Helen was dating Paul “Red” Linn at the time and Red was serving in the Pacific during WWII. Helen and Red eventually married.

Postmarked from Fort McClellan, AL, 6 Sep 1944, addressed to Mr. & Mrs. Carl Miller, RR#1, Willshire, Ohio, from Pvt. Herbert Miller:

5 Sep 1944
Dear Mom & All,
Received your box the other week also received your box today containing cigarettes, peanuts & etc. They really taste good.

About all we are doing now is physical training, firing on range and study of weapons. We fired the carbines Monday. They are a little rifle with a barrel 16 inches long and [weighs] 6 lbs. It fires 15 shots as fast as you can pull the trigger. It really is a nice weapon. I qualified for sharpshooter with it. We will be having night problems a lot from now on. We have a 6 hour night problem Friday night. The best part of it is we get Saturday morning off and in the afternoon have 2 hours swimming.

Has Dad gotten the hen house completed yet? I’m glad to hear my car is starting better. How are the tires holding up?

Well it looks like Germany will give up pretty soon. They will have to because we have been on German soil for quite a few days. When Germany gives up it won’t be over a couple of months to knock off Japan. You remember me telling about Moore going A.W.O.L. Well he came back the other day and before they could court martial him he took off.

Poor Pvt. Goldman. Tonight he was over to the P.X. and somebody put a lighted cigarette on his hat. About ½ of it burnt before he knew it and was he ever mad.

They are getting up a softball team to play the W.A.C.s Thursday night. I think I’ll play. There are a lot of W.A.C.s here. They work in the hospital and drive trucks etc. I went to a show Sunday night. Saw Red Skeleton in “Rainbow Island.” It was really good. I sat beside a sergeant who was in the Sicily and Tunisia Companies in Italy. They had news reel showing the battle in the streets of Paris. I never heard anybody cuss the Germans like he did. He was wounded seriously and was just recovered.

I guess I’d better close for now.

Love,
Herb

My dad wrote the following letter to his church youth group back home at Zion Lutheran Church in Chattanooga, Ohio. But first he apparently sent the letter to his sister Helen so she could edit it before passing it on:

5 Sep 1944
Dear Youth Council,
It is Tuesday night and since we don’t have every night off I decided to write a few lines to let you all know how I am.

Helen has been sending me the Youth Council Paper. I enjoy reading it, especially the jokes. Say, who thinks them up anyway? I noticed most of the letters in there were from Navy and Marines and since they cannot get along without the Army I better write a few lines for the Army.

I have found out there is only two times in the Army, quick time and double time. Quick time is a rapid walk and double time is twice as fast. We do a lot of both. Likewise the Army has two favorite phrases, “Double time–march” and “break is over, back to work.” We always hate to hear the sergeants say those two. As you know the Alabama weather is very hot, which makes it very uncomfortable to double time or to do exercises.

I saw a show the other night. The title was “Rainbow Island.” It really is a good show. That makes the second show I have seen since I left the vicinity of Chattanooga.

Thursday night Co. A plays the W.A.C.s in a game of softball. It’s a good way to get acquainted. Right?

Guess I’d better close since the lights in the day room will go out in a half hour.

A Member,
Herbert Miller

P.S. Helen don’t put this P.S. in the letter but would you correct this letter for mistakes?

Helen and Herb Miller, brother and sister. Probably taken during his furlough, just before he was sent to Europe.

Postmarked from Fort McClellan, AL, 11 Sep 1944, addressed to Mr. & Mrs. Carl Miller, RR#1, Willshire, Ohio, from Pvt. Herbert Miller:

Sunday afternoon, 10 Sep 1944
Dear Mom & All,
I just had chow. Had turkey, dressing, tomatoes, salad, carrots, and ice cream. I have to scrub up my mess gear and canteen cup pretty soon. We eat out in the field tomorrow.

We fired the automatic rifles. They told us to fire them one at a time. Well you squeeze the trigger and release it and quick about five shots go off. We will probably fire the machine gun and mortar next week.

Em wrote and said Vernie and Kenny were really good tomato pickers.

I got a pass for town but don’t think I will use it. I’m going into town some Saturday night and get a few things.

Do you remember the guy whose fox hole caved in when the tank ran over us? His name is Harry Goldman. He went out to the obstacle course and climbed up on the net and had someone take his picture. And that book I sent home, he goes around and had the guys sign their name and put sergeant, corporal, lieutenant, or captain in front of it. Somebody asked him why? He said he wanted to make an impression on his wife.

Guess I’d better close,
Love,
Herbie

Postmarked from Fort McClellan, AL, 13 Sep 1944, addressed to Mr. & Mrs. Carl Miller, RR#1, Willshire, Ohio, from Pvt. Herbert Miller:

12 Sep 1944
Dear Mom & All,
It’s Tuesday night and don’t have very much time to write tonight. So this letter will be rather short.

Last night my turn came up for detail and didn’t get it finished until 11:15.

Monday we went out and practiced on the different formations for combat patrols. We had eight different problems and we ate in the field. One problem was to knock out a machine gun nest, another to capture a village, another to find and kill snipers, etc. Today we had 2 hrs. of P.R. One hour we ran cross country. We had 4 periods of mortar, 1 period of bayonet practice and 1 period of trentation [?]. That is the discussion of the latest news. There are five armies in France. The Canadian 1st Army, the English 2nd, the American Third Armored Division, the American Seventh Army, and one other American Army. The English and Canadian are in the northern part of France and are fighting in the Netherlands. The one American army (I think the Third Armored Division) has penetrated five miles through the outer Siegfried Line, inside of Germany. The other two American Armies, one which landed in Southern France, will without a doubt connect with the Third and also the Italian Campaign. So you see there will be a line from the Atlantic Ocean at the Netherland border to the Mediterranean Sea.

I imagine the corn is about all cut that is to be cut. Is the tomato season over with yet or is it just getting a good start?

Guess I’d better close,
Love,
Herbie

Postmarked from Fort McClellan, AL, 15 Sep 1944, addressed to Mr. & Mrs. Carl Miller, RR#1, Willshire, Ohio, from Pvt. Herbert Miller:

15 Sep 1944
Dear Mom & All,
Tonight is Thursday night and am about ready for bed. But decided to write you a letter first.

We fired the machine gun today. They are pretty nice to fire, except they jump around a little bit. Tomorrow we fire the automatic rifle at moving targets. Saturday we fire practice rounds in the mortar. We started out on log drill. Each log weighs about 500-1000 lbs. and there are 6 men to a log. We lift them, throw them, and lot of other different things.

Say, the next time you send a box would you slip in a dime’s worth of hard candy? I’m sort of hungry for it. I haven’t’ eaten any since I’ve been in the Army.

Can Helen get the film? I had my picture taken by one of the boys here. I stripped to the waist and put on my steel helmet and had my rifle and bayonet. I will send you some after I get them.

We ate out in the field every day this week except Tuesday and we go out again tomorrow. Today we had chicken, mashed potatoes, cold slaw, ice cream, iced tea, creamed carrots, and a piece of pie.

How do the kids like school? Vernie’s a freshman this year isn’t he? What subjects are they taking?

I imagine the tomato season is about over. I got a letter from Dale yesterday and he said they are turning out pretty good. I wanted to write him tonight but am getting so sleepy I think I will go to bed.

Love,
Herbie

Herb Miller, basic training, Fort McClellan, AL, 1944.

This is the photo my dad mentioned in the above letter and now we know the story behind it. I always wondered…

The next letter was written to my dad’s sister Helen, postmarked from Fort McClellan, AL, 18 Sep 1944, addressed to Miss Helen Miller, RR#1, Willshire, Ohio, from Pvt. Herbert Miller:

17 Sep 1944
Dear Helen,

I’m not going to write a very long letter. I don’t have much time. You asked what size of film the camera took. It is 127 or G-127. Either one.

We had bologna for supper and chocolate pudding. Today has been a hot day. It gets pretty chilly at night. Tomorrow we fall out with full field equipment. I don’t know what we do but it will be something. Yes, I would like to read the St. Paul’s League Paper, if you could get it. So Edna Clase and Dobby Gibbons are getting married. There are a lot of them getting married back home.

I’m going to read a comic book and go to bed. I want to get plenty of sleep tonight. Guess I’d better close. Will write soon.

Love,
Herb

P.S. Tell Helen this camera will be OK. I won’t have so awful much time to take pictures. We only have one more Sunday off before I come home. The rest of the time will be in Libman [?]

All things considered, I think my dad wrote a lot of letters. I really don’t know how he found the time to write to immediate family, extended family, and friends. He also enjoyed taking photos and developing the pictures himself. He had a camera in Germany as well and took photos there during the war.

More letters next week.

Nov 21

Tombstone Tuesday–George Pfeifer

George Pfeifer, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of George Pfeifer, located in row 9 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

Father
George Pfeifer
1868-1945

George Pfeifer was born 8 September 1868 in Moulton, Auglaize County, Ohio, [1] the son of Christopher and Fredericka (Kneisel) Pfeifer. [2] [3] Although George’s marriage record indicates his mother’s maiden name was Miller the 1864 marriage record of his parents indicates her name was Kneisel, sometimes spelled Kniesel. [4]

In 1870 the Christopher Pfeifer family lived in Moulton Township, Auglaize County, with a Moulton post office address. Their household in 1870: Christopher, 50; Fredericka, 23; John, 17; Henry, 11; Kate, 4; Nicholas, 3; and George, 2. Christopher was born in Bayern and Fredericka in Württemberg. All of their children were born in Ohio. The father Christopher was a farmer. [5] Apparently this was Christopher’s second marriage.

The Christopher Pfeifer household in 1880: Christopher, 60; Mary, 30; Katie, 15; Nicholas, 14; George, 12; Anna, 10; Lawrence, 8; Frederich, 5; and Jacob, 2. [6]

George’s father Christopher Pfeifer died 14 September 1880 and is buried in Zion Cemetery in Moulton. [7] After Christopher’s death George’s mother Fredericka married Nicholas Hoehamer and they moved to the Chatt area, just across the state line, in Adams County, Indiana. That is probably how George Pfeifer came to meet Barbara Kuehm. The Hoehamers were once members of Zion Chatt and several of their children were baptized and confirmed at Zion. George probably attended there, too. Nicholas and Fredericka are buried in Willard Cemetery, aka Mount Hope Cemetery, Adams County, Indiana.

George Pfeifer married Barbara Kuehm on 25 May 1899, married by Lutheran pastor A.F. Klopfer. They were not married at Zion Chatt. Although they obtained their marriage license in Adams County, Indiana, their marriage record indicates they were married in Erastus, Mercer County, Ohio. George Pfeifer was 31 years of age, born in Ohio, reportedly the son of Christopher and Fredericke (Miller) Pfeifer. He was a farmer and resided in Knox County, Indiana, at the time of their marriage. Barbara was 30 years of age, born in Germany, and resided in Chattanooga, Ohio. She was the daughter of Michael and Elizabeth (Miller) Kuehm. This was the first marriage for both of them and Nicholas Pfeifer and Elizabeth Schott were witnesses to their marriage. [2] [3]

I have not located Barbara and George in the 1900 census.

Barbara and their two children lived in Adams County, Indiana, with her widowed mother Elisabeth Kuehm in 1910. Their household in 1910: Elizabeth, 83, head; Barbara “Phizer”, 40 daughter; Hilda [Pfeifer], 8, granddaughter; and Carl [Pfeifer], 6, grandson. The census indicates that Barbara was married but her husband George was not enumerated with them. [8]

Barbara and George Pfeifer moved to Van Wert, Ohio, about 1915, where they lived on Cherry Street. In 1920 they lived at 412 Cherry Street and their household consisted of: George, 50; Barbara, 49; children Hilda, 17, and Carl, 16; and Barbara’s widowed sister Katharine [Kuehm] Hoehamer, 62. George Pfeifer worked at a common laborer. This record indicates that Barbara immigrated in 1873. [9]

George’s wife Barbara died in Van Wert on 25 June 1928 and is buried in row 7 in Zion Chatt’s Cemetery.

In 1940 George lived with his daughter Hilda/Hulda and her family and George’s son Carl. Their household in 1940: Kenneth Guinn, 45, head; Hulda Guinn, 38, wife; Robert Guinn, 15, son; George Pfeifer, 72, father-in-law; Carl Pfeifer, 36, brother-in-law. George was widowed and the extended family on North Cherry in Van Wert, Ohio. This enumeration indicates that The Guinn family and Carl lived in this same house in 1935. But it indicates that George had lived in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1935. Kenneth and Carl worked for a steam railroad but George did not work. [10]

George Peifer died in Van Wert of coronary heart disease on 26 June 1945. He was 76 years, 8 months, and 18 days old and lived at 408 Cherry at the time of his death. E. Knolls was in charge of the arrangements and George was buried on the 29th. His death certificate indicates that he was a machinist helper for the New York Central Railroad. His father’s name was given as Jacob and mother’s name unknown, per his death certificate. Name listed as Georg J. Pfeifer. C.H. Pfeifer [their son] was the informant for the personal information on the death certificate. [1]

Barbara and George had two children and they were both baptized at Zion Chatt:
Hilda Margaretha Magdalena Pfeiffer (1902-1967), married Kenneth Guinn
Karl Heinrich Michael Pfeiffer (1903-1954), probably never married and was a WWII veteran

I am often surprised at the connections to my family that I learn about while writing these blog posts. George’s sister Anna Regina Pfeifer (1871-1911) married Adam Jacob Pflueger (1862-1919). I am related to the Pfluegers on my mom’s side of the family and Adam Jacob Pflueger is my first cousin three times removed. Adam Jacob and Anna Regina are buried in Zion Schumm’s cemetery and I posted their Tombstone Tuesdays some time ago.

 

[1] “Ohio, County Death Records, 1840-2001,” database with images, FamilySearch, George J Pfeiffer, 26 Jun 1945; Pleasant Township, Van Wert, FHL microfilm 1952880.

[2] “Indiana Marriages, 1811-2007,” database with images, FamilySearch.org, Geo Pfeifer and Barbara Kuehm, 25 May 1899; Adams County Marriages, Vol. I, p.77; FHL microfilm 2321357.

[3] “Indiana Marriages, 1811-2007,” database with images, FamilySearch.org, George J Pfeifer and Barbara Kuehm, 25 May 1899; Adams County Marriages, Vol. G, p.495; FHL microfilm 2,321,629.

[4] “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” database with images, FamilySearch, Christopher Pfeifer and Frederica Kniesel, 11 May 1864; Auglaize County Marriages, Vol.3, p.161, FHL microfilm 963056.

[5] 1870 U.S. Census, Moulton, Auglaize, Ohio, p.440B, dwelling and family 139, Christopher Reifer; Ancestry.com; FHL microfilm 552671, NARA microfilm M593, roll 1172.

[6] 1880 U.S. Census, Auglaize, Ohio, ED 8, p.450B, dwelling & family 66, Christopher Pfeifer; Ancestry.com; NARA microfilm T9, roll 993.

[7] Find A Grave.com, Memorial #23764396, Christopher Pfeufer [Pfeifer], Zion Cemetery, Moulton, Ohio.

[8] 1910 U.S. Census, Jefferson, Adams County, Indiana, ED 4, p. 2B, visited 37, family 37, Elizabeth Kuhm; Ancestry.com; from FHL microfilm 1374351, from NARA microfilm T624, roll 338. [Barbara was enumerated as Barbara Phizer.]

[9] 1920 U.S. Census, Van Wert, Van Wert County, Ohio, ED 130, p.9A, dwelling 214, visited 223, George R Pfiefer; Ancestry.com; NARA microfilm T625, roll 1446.

[10] 1940 U.S. Census, Van Wert, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 81-9, p.10A, house no. 408, visited 237; Kenneth Guinn; Ancestry.com NARA microfilm T627, roll 3163.

Nov 17

Dear Mom & All–WWII Letters from Herb (part 6)

I continue with the letters my dad wrote home during his basic training at Fort McClellan, Alabama. It was late in the summer of 1944 and at that time he was in Company A, 12th Battalion, 8th Regiment.

Herb Miller, U.S. Army.

Postmarked Fort McClellan, AL, 20 Aug 1944, 11:30 p.m., to Mr. & Mrs. Carl Miller, RR#1 Willshire, Ohio:

20 Aug 1944
Dear Mom & All,

Just a few lines to let you know I’m OK. I have about 1/2 hr. before church to write this letter. I’ve found out not to plan anything in the Army. So I decided to write now, then I’m sure I have time.

I’m planning on going into town this afternoon and eve with some of the cadre men (non-commissioned officers) and they will get me out of any detail for today.

I received a letter from Bernice some time ago and finally answered today. This morning for chow we had cooked raisins, eggs, toast, and breakfast cereal. This noon is when we have the good meal. I slept until 8:00 o’clock this morning and I really slept good. Guess I’d better close.

Love,
Herb

Herb Miller, Fort McClellan, Alabama, 1944.

Postmarked Fort McClellan, AL, 24 Aug 1944, 11:30 a.m., to Mr. & Mrs. Carl Miller, RR#1 Willshire, Ohio:

23 Aug 1944
Dear Mom & All,

I finally found time to write youins a few lines. I imagine Ruth and Bob are home now. I wanted to write to them but decided to wait until they went back, maybe by that time I will have more time to write.

We had a pretty easy day today. Two hrs. of swim, 1 hr. of rifle study, 1 hr. show on the bazooka, 1 hr. of military discipline, 1 hr. of P.T., and 2 hrs. of map reading. We really had a good meal tonight. They had one kind of salad I really liked. It was made out of grated cheese and pears.

I received a letter from Howards today.

I imagine youins got the foundation built for the hen house. I won’t even know the place when I come home. New well and new hen house.

Boy these Brooklyn guys are really jokers. They are always getting on detail for something or other and it really tickles me, especially Harry Goldman. He is about 35 yrs. old and doesn’t give a darn what does happen.

There were two guys who deserted the Army last Sunday night. Today I saw some of the guys carrying their equipment and clothes out. So I imagine they found them and are taking them to the stockade. They have a lot of American prisoners here at camp and also a lot of German prisoners. The American prisoners are A.W.O.L.s and deserters and get fed bread and water and are always under guard. The German prisoners get good meals and they don’t always have guards and have very little work.

A sergeant was telling us that they had a truck load of German prisoners out gathering up scrap paper from the cans [?]. They drove off and left one and he got madder than the devil because he had to walk instead of ride back to his barracks. German prisoners don’t cause very much trouble.

Paris fell the other day. The French underground went in and took over the city from the Germans. I imagine you hear more of the news than I do.

We have a new platoon sergeant who just came back from action on the Solomons and other islands. He really is a nice sergeant. Guess I’d better close.

Love,
Herbie

Herbert Miller

Postmarked Fort McClellan, AL, 26 Aug 1944, 8:30 a.m., to Mr. & Mrs. Carl Miller, RR#1 Willshire, Ohio:

25 Aug 1944
Dear Mom & All,

Received your letter today and decided to answer it while I had & have a few minutes time. Tomorrow is Saturday and have K.P. tomorrow and table waiting Sunday. Table waiting isn’t very hard work, only a couple of hours. We had to scrub out our huts tonight. It took about half an hour. Today we practiced on antiaircraft targets and moving targets with the rifle, also the bazooka and the automatic rifle. The automatic rifle just squeeze the trigger and 20 shots go off just that quick. It weighs 20 lbs. and looks like a rifle. Before long will be shooting the machine guns and mortars. Only six more weeks of training and then will have bivouacs or maneuvers the rest of the seventeen weeks.

Say do you suppose you could get my little camera I sold to Murlin. Maybe Maggie would sell it back. If you can get it and it won’t cause too much bother I would like to have it. But I can’t get film here. Helen can see if she can get some first at Berne. It takes a different size than the box camera. If the film can’t be gotten you don’t need to bother with the camera.

By the sound of your letter they must really be putting the hen house up.

That was really too bad about Don Dellinger. I got a letter today from Lanora McClain/McClair [?] and she was telling me a little about it.

Yes I read Red’s letter in the Celina Standard. I don’t remember much about it, it was awhile back.

Guess I’d better close and get some sleep. Have to get up about 3:30 to report to the kitchen on time.

Love,
Herbert

The Miller farm, where Herb grew up.

The next letter is postmarked Fort McClellan, AL, 27 Aug 1944, 11:30 p.m., to Mr. & Mrs. Carl Miller, RR#1 Willshire, Ohio:

27 Aug 1944
Dear Mom & All,

Well here is another letter. Have a little time today because it is Sunday. I am table waiter today. It isn’t hard and don’t take much time. Also will get all I want to eat.

Yesterday was on K.P. and in the afternoon went out on the range and shot the rifle grenade so I wouldn’t have to make the time up. Those rifle grenades kick like a mule.

Tomorrow we go on a fourteen mile hike and to top it all it will be hill most of the way. If it is up to Baines Gap it will be one of those forced marches.

You remember me telling you about those two guys Wagner and Moore who went over the Hill. Well they have them in the stockade now. It will really be tough on them. I washed out my clothes or fatigues today. There were a lot of guys down there and all the washers were taken. So I got a five gallon bucket that I found down in the shower room, filled it half full of soapy water and washed out my clothes by putting them in the bucket and kept stomping them with my foot. It worked pretty good and didn’t take near as long as scrubbing them out.

I think there was a guy who went over the hill last night. His wife was here all week and the sarge only let him out a couple nights. He was on K.P. today and he didn’t show up and nobody has seen him.

Well I guess I’d better close. Can’t think of any more to write. Am fine and hope you all are the same.

Love,
Herbie

Helen and Herb Miller, brother and sister, 1944.

Postmarked Fort McClellan, AL, 31 Aug 1944, 11:30 a.m., to Miss Helen Miller, RR#1 Willshire, Ohio [Helen was Herb’s sister]:

30 Aug 1944
Dear Helen,

I received your letter today and sure was glad to hear from you. My pen just ran out of ink and had to fill it with a different color.

Well the end of this week will be the end of the seventh week. Only ten more wks to go. They are rushing us pretty fast. A lot of the things we are taking up now the rest of the co.s [companies] took up in their tenth week. Some of the guys think we will only have twelve weeks here and then take jungle training, either here in the U.S. or on an island like Hawaii. If we go to another place beside the U.S. [we] won’t get a furlough. But that’s only a latrine rumor and you can’t go on that. Tomorrow night we have a night problem and will be out most of the night, so I won’t get any letters written then.

I read in the Standard about “Red” and “Vincet.” It seems like most of the guys that were wounded or killed were hit by artillery or mortar shells.

I sent home a Doughboy book [?] or rather we had to. We couldn’t send them to anyone except immediate members of the family.

I imagine the hen house is pretty will completed. I would have liked to go to the S.S. [Sunday School] Picnic. Guess I’d better close for now.

Love,
Herb

Today’s last letter is postmarked Fort McClellan, AL, 2 Sep 1944, 11:30 a.m., to Mr. & Mrs. Carl Miller, RR#1 Willshire, Ohio:

1 Sep 1944
Dear Mom & All,

I had another letter started tonight but the sergeant came in with this stationery so decided to write on this. What do you think of it?

Tonight was pay day. I received $24.75 this time. Those bonds are going to count up pretty fast. Just think I have about $11 in war bonds now.

The darndest thing happened today. You see tomorrow night we have a parade in front of three generals. It will last for one hour. Our equipment will be suntans, helmet liners, cartridge belts, and rifles. They all have to be in tip-top condition. Well out of the whole Battalion they picked forty men out of company A to be “Guards of Honor.” There are about two hundred men to a company and four companies to a Battalion. And I happen to be one of the forty men. We have been having rehearsals for the “Guard of Honor.”

The company has been restricted to the area for two weeks because of the condition of the huts. We cleaned them up good and the Major examined them and said they were in the best condition of the Regiment. So they raised the restriction and it will be possible to get a weekend pass.

They are really rushing us now. We fire the bazookas tomorrow. We have been dry firing the carbine and the automatic rifle. So will fire them on the range in the near future. Those carbines are the real guns. The barrel is only about sixteen inches long. The whole length is about twenty-six inches long. It weighs 5¼ lbs and holds a magazine of fifteen rounds. It is gas operated and will fire all fifteen shots as fast as you can pull the trigger. The automatic rifle weighs 22 lbs and fires twenty rounds by just pulling the trigger once.

You asked if I was hearing from Dorothy. Well I haven’t heard from her in the last week and a half. Don’t know what the trouble is. I stopped writing when I didn’t hear from her.

Guess I’d better close for now.

Love,
Herb

P.S. Received the box today. Everything was in A-1 shape and really tastes good.

I found it very interesting to read that he was selected to be part of the Guard of Honor. He was a hard worker and I am sure he deserved it and was proud of it. It is also interesting to see how much he looked forward to receiving letters and boxes from home. Those letters from family and neighbors sure meant a lot to him.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nov 14

Tombstone Tuesday–Barbara (Kuehm) Pfeifer

Barbara Pfeifer, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Barbara Pfeifer, located in row 7 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

Barbara Pfeifer
1870-1928

Barbara Kuehm was born in Schillersdorf, Alsace-Lorraine, on 27 February 1870, the daughter of Michael and Elizabeth (Miller) Kuehm, sometimes spelled Kuhm. Barbara’s parents were also born in Alsace-Lorraine [1] [2] and the family immigrated about 1873. [3] The Kuehms attended church at Zion Chatt and Barbara was confirmed there on 6 April 1884. Barbara was the sixth of seven known children born to Michael and Elizabeth.

In 1880 Barbara lived with her parents and 5 siblings in Jefferson Township, Adams County, Indiana, where her father Michael farmed. In their household: Michael and Elisabeth, both 53 years old; Michael (Jr), 19; Jacob, 17; Mary, 15; Lena, 12; Barbara, 10; and George, 8. All were born in Alsace. [4]

Barbara Kuehm married George Pfeifer on 25 May 1899, married by Lutheran pastor A.F. Klopfer. They were not married at Zion Chatt and, although they obtained their marriage license in Adams County, Indiana, their marriage record indicates they were married in Erastus, Mercer County, Ohio. George Pfeifer was 31 years of age, born in Ohio, the son of Christopher and Fredericke (Kniesel) Pfeifer. He was a farmer and resided in Knox County, Indiana, at the time of their marriage. Barbara was 30 years of age, born in Germany, and resided in Chattanooga, Ohio. Their marriage record indicates that she was the daughter of Michael and Elizabeth (Miller) Kuehm. Her nationality was listed as “for”, which I assume means foreign. This was the first marriage for both of them and Nicholas Pfeifer and Elizabeth Schott were witnesses to their marriage. [5] [6]

I have not been able to locate Barbara and George in the 1900 census.

Barbara’s father Michael Kuehm died in 1909 and in 1910 Barbara and two children lived with her widowed mother Elisabeth Kuehm. Their household in 1910: Elizabeth, 83, head; Barbara “Phizer”, 40 daughter; Hilda [Pfeifer], 8, granddaughter; and Carl [Pfeifer], 6, grandson. The census indicates that Barbara was married but her husband George was not enumerated with them. [7] Barbara’s mother Elizabeth (Miller) Kuehm died two years later, in 1912. Barbara’s parents Michael and Elizabeth Kuehm are also buried in Zion Chatt’s cemetery.

Barbara and George Pfeifer moved to Van Wert, Ohio, about 1915, where they lived on Cherry Street. In 1920 they lived at 412 Cherry Street and their household consisted of: George, 50; Barbara, 49; children Hilda, 17, and Carl, 16; and Barbara’s widowed sister Katharine [Kuehm] Hoehamer, 62. George Pfeifer worked at a common laborer. This record indicates that Barbara immigrated in 1873. [8]

Barbara (Kuehm) Pfeifer died of cardiovascular renal disease on 25 June 1928 in Van Wert at the age of 58 years, 2 months, and 28 days, after suffering with the illness for three years. Barbara was a housewife and had resided in Van Wert for 13 years. Her address was 414 N. Cherry Street. Her husband George was the informant for the information on her death certificate. Barbara was buried on 27th. [1] Barbara’s death information was not recorded in Zion Chatt’s records.

Barbara’s husband George Peifer died in 1945 and is buried a coupe rows from Barbara.

Barbara and George had two children and they were both baptized at Zion Chatt:
Hilda Margaretha Magdalena Pfeiffer (1902-1967), married Kenneth Guinn
Karl Heinrich Michael Pfeiffer (1903-1954), probably never married and was a WWII veteran

 

[1] “Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953,” database with images, FamilySearch.org, Barbara E Pfeifer, 25 Jun 1928; Van Wert, Van Wert, Ohio; FHL microfilm 1991301.

[2] “Ohio, County Death Records, 1840-2001,” database with images, FamilySearch.org, Barbara E. Pfeifer, 25 Jun 1928; Van Wert, Pleasant Township, Van Wert, Ohio; FHL microfilm 1952878.

[3] 1900 U.S. Census, Jefferson, Adams County, Indiana, ED 4, p. 11B, dwelling 203, family 203, Michael Kuehm; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com; from FHL microfilm 1240357, from NARA microfilm T623, roll 357.

[4] 1880 U.S. Census, Jefferson, Adams County, Indiana, ED 133, p. 6B, dwelling 50, family 50, Michael Kuhm; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com; from NARA microfilm T9, roll 263.

[5] “Indiana Marriages, 1811-2007,” database with images, FamilySearch.org, Geo Pfeifer and Barbara Kuehm, 25 May 1899; Adams County Marriages, Vol. I, p.77; FHL microfilm 2321357.

[6] “Indiana Marriages, 1811-2007,” database with images, FamilySearch.org, George J Pfeifer and Barbara Kuehm, 25 May 1899; Adams County Marriages, Vol. G, p.495; FHL microfilm 2,321,629.

[7] 1910 U.S. Census, Jefferson, Adams County, Indiana, ED 4, p. 2B, visited 37, family 37, Elizabeth Kuhm; Ancestry.com; from FHL microfilm 1374351, from NARA microfilm T624, roll 338. [Barbara was enumerated as Barbara Phizer.]

[8] 1920 U.S. Census, Van Wert, Van Wert County, Ohio, ED 130, p.9A, dwelling 214, visited 223, George R Pfiefer; Ancestry.com; NARA microfilm T625, roll 1446.

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