Jul 15

Tombstone Tuesday–Anna M. (Grauberger) Reichard

Anna M. (Grauberger) Reichard, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

Anna M. (Grauberger) Reichard, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Anna M. (Grauberger) Reichard, located in row 1 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

ANNA M. REICHARD
1900-1942

Anna Maria Grauberger was born 27 November 1900, the daughter of Michael Heinrich “Henry” and Emma (Baker) Grauberger. [1] However, her Mercer County birth record indicates she was born 22 November 1900. [2] I tend to go with the church record, which was recorded before the county record.

Anna was baptized at Zion Chatt on 27 January 1901, with Heinrich Becker and Anna Maria Becker as sponsors. She was confirmed 30 May 1915 at Zion by Rev. W.F.H. Heuer.

Anna Grauberger confirmation photo, . (photo courtesy of Deb Bollenbacher Reichard)

Anna Grauberger confirmation photo, 1915. (photo courtesy of Deb Bollenbacher Reichard)

Anna had three sisters who were named in the church records: Laura Margaretha (b. 1904), Esther Lavina (b. 1911), and Edna Elizabeth, (b. 1913).

Anna Grauberger birth record, Mercer County, Ohio.

Anna Grauberger birth record, Mercer County, Ohio.

Anna Grauberber married John E. Reichard of Willshire on 26 April 1925. The ceremony was performed in the bride’s home by Zion’s pastor, Rev. Jacob E. Albrecht. The church records indicate that John was 19 and Anna was 24.

According to their probate marriage record John was the son of James and Minnie (Sonday) Reichard and was born 26 September 1905. His occupation was a printer. [3]

John Reichard-Anna Grauberger marriage record, Mercer County, Ohio, Vol. 12, p. 358.

John Reichard-Anna Grauberger marriage record, Mercer County, Ohio, Vol. 12, p. 358.

In 1930 John and Anna lived on State Street in Willshire, where John was still working as a printer and Anna was a housewife. [4] He in fact printed The Willshire Herald, known today as The Photo Star. He was later Willshire’s postmaster. My mom recalls that Anna used to make dresses for her and her sisters when they were little girls.

Anna died 17 May 1942 of septicemia/infection in her blood stream, according to Zion’s records. She was 41 years, 5 months, and 20 days old. She was buried on 20 May and was survived by her husband, son, mother, and three sisters.

Her widowed husband married Dolores E. (Book) Habegger in 1944 and they had a son, Daniel. John died in 1976 and is buried beside Dolores in Willshire Cemetery.

John and Anna Reichard had two children. Their first son, Harold Lee Reichard, was born 7 November 1926 and died the same day of collapsed lungs. According to his death certificate he was buried in the Chattanooga Cemetery, [5] but there is no record of his burial in the church records and no tombstone exists.

Harold Lee Reichard death certificate.

Harold Lee Reichard death certificate.

Their second son, Eugene Vernon Reichard, was born 13 April 1928 and was baptized at Zion Chatt on 14 June 1928. His parents were his baptismal sponsors. Eugene married Betty Weinman in 1948. He died 17 September 2009 and is buried in Willshire Cemetery.

John, Anna (Grauberger) Reichard, and Son Eugene. (photo courtesy of Deb Bollenbacher Reichard)

John, Anna (Grauberger) Reichard, and son Eugene. (photo courtesy of Deb Bollenbacher Reichard)

I remember “Gene” Reichard very well because he was our Motorists Mutual Insurance agent for many years, from the time we were married in 1973, until the time he retired.

Anna’s obituary:

Wife and Mother is Beckoned to Eternal Home
There was universal regret and sincere sympathy expressed throughout the Willshire-Chattanooga community Sunday night and Monday morning—regret for the passing of a worthy young wife and mother, sympathy for the bereaved husband and young son—when it became known that Anna Marie Reichard, wife of Postmaster John E. Reichard, of Willshire, had yielded to death’s summons. She died at the Adams County Memorial hospital in Decatur, Indiana at 9:15 p.m., Sunday, May 17.

 Ill since March 19, her condition became so unsatisfactory that hospital care and treatment was regarded as imperative, she was taken to the hospital one week ago last Thursday. Failure to react favorably to treatment, a blood test showed an advanced stage of septicemia, and lacking powers of resistance, the inevitable resulted.

Born a daughter of the late Henry Grauberger and Mrs. Emma Grauberger in Blackcreek township, Mercer County, Ohio, she was aged 41 years, five months and 20 days. Always of a religious inclination, she was confirmed as member of the Zion Lutheran church at Chattanooga, May 30, 1915, continuing active in the various phases of the church work until deterred from doing so by ill health.

She was united in marriage with John. E. Reichard, April 26, 1925, since which time she had been a resident of Willshire, and for the past 18 months, was assistant postmaster, which brought her a community-wide acquaintance, which began in 1929, when she assisted Mr. Reichard in the publication of The Willshire Herald, and by all who knew her she was held in the highest of esteem.

Those who survive in their grief are the husband, John E. Reichard, one son, Eugene Reichard, the mother, Mrs. Emma Grauberger, and three sisters, Mrs. John Sipe of near Monroe, Indiana; Mrs. Guy Krall of Rockford, and Mrs. Robert Clase of Chattanooga, Ohio. One son, who died in infancy, preceded her in death.

Mrs. Reichard had been a hospital patient at three different times, undergoing a major operation March 13, 1941, and from that time on the state of her health was all but precarious until the end.

Funeral services from the Grauberger residence, six miles south of Willshire, at 2 o’clock, and from the Zion Lutheran church at 2:30 o’clock Wednesday afternoon, with Rev. Carl Yahl, conduction, the body being laid to rest in the burying-ground of that church. [6]

Thanks to Deb (Bollenbacher) Reichard for providing Anna’s obituary and family photos!

 

[1] The early church records show the surname name as Becker. Later records spell the name Baker.

[2] “Ohio, County Births, 1841-2003,” index and images, FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org : accessed 13 Jul 2014), Blackcreek Township, Mercer County Births, For the Year Ending March 31st, 1901, unpaginated. Her date of birth was recorded on April? Her baptism was recorded on about 27 January 1901, closer to her birth date. Her age at death also agrees with the date of the church record.

[3] ”Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-1994,” index and images, FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org : accessed 13 Jul 2014), Mercer County Marriage Records 1920-1925, Vol. 12: 358, John Reichard and Anna Grauberger, 26 April 1925.

[4] 1930 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 22, p. 252 dwelling 88, family 88, John Reichard; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 July 2014); from FHL microfilm 2341624, from NARA microfilm T626, roll 1890.

[5] “Ohio, Deaths, 1908-1953,” index and images, FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org : accessed 13 July 2014), Harold Lee Reichard death certificate.

[6] Undated newspaper clipping, courtesy of Deb (Bollenbacher) Reichard.

Jul 11

Holmes County, Ohio, 2014

This past week we spent a few days in Holmes County. In addition to the beautiful eastern Ohio countryside in this Amish community, there is an abundance of shopping opportunities, handcrafted Amish items, cheese, wine, and lots of delicious home-style food. It is also the area where several of my ancestors lived for awhile on their way westward.

Sugarcreek, Holmes County, Ohio. (2014 photo by Karen)

Sugarcreek, Tuscarawas County, Ohio. (2014 photo by Karen)

Ohio is often called the Gateway to the West because so many settlers traveled through Ohio, either overland or on one of Ohio’s waterways. When I sat down and thought about it I was surprised at how many of my ancestors not only traveled through Ohio, but actually lived in the Holmes County area for a few years. Below is a list of my ancestors that once resided in the area.

Both the Schumms and the Pfluegers lived in Holmes County in the early 1830s. Both families worshiped with the Evangelical United Zion Congregation in Winesburg, where several family members were married and where some of their children were baptized. Christian Pflueger owned land in the area between Winesburg, Walnut Creek and Berlin. Both families moved to Van Wert County in about 1838. Johann Georg Schumm and Christian Pflueger are my third great-grandfathers.

Christian Pflueger lived in this area of Holmes County in the 1830s. (2014 photo by Karen)

Christian Pflueger lived in this area of Holmes County in the 1830s. (2014 photo by Karen)

My great-grandfather John Scaer was born in Baltic in 1864. This little village is actually located in three counties–Coshocton, Holmes, and Tuscarawas–but John’s obituary states that he was born in Tuscarawas County. John’s family later moved to Monroeville, Indiana.

Baltic, Ohio. (2014 photo by Karen)

Baltic, Ohio. (2014 photo by Karen)

The Baltic branch spelled their name “Scarr” and we found Scarr tombstones in West Lawn Cemetery in Baltic. The Monroeville branch probably changed the spelling to Scaer and some of them later went on to change the spelling to Scare. My mom recalls her mother Hilda and Hilda’s brother Oscar Scaer traveling to Baltic to visit their Scarr relatives.

Cemetery, Baltic, Ohio. (2014 photo by Karen)

West Lawn Cemetery, Baltic, Ohio. (2014 photo by Karen)

Nicholas and Ruth (Phillips) Headington left Maryland about 1820 and settled in Knox County for a few years before moving on to Jay County, Indiana. While in Knox County they lived near Mt. Vernon, where several of their children were born. Nicholas was my fifth great-grandfather and fought in the War of 1812.

Louis Breuninger, my second great-grandfather, was living in Canal Dover in 1840. The town is called Dover today and is in Tuscarawas County. By 1850 Louis had moved to Green Bay, Wisconsin, where he married Maria Seckel in 1851. Louis moved his family to the Schumm area by 1870.

Down the road from Dover is New Philadelphia, where Jackson Brewster and his family stayed for a short time on their way from Fayette County, Pennsylvania, to Adams County, Indiana, between 1860-1870. Jackson is my third great-grandfather.

Joe has at least one ancestor who lived in the area. His fourth great-grandfather Jonathan Grant came to what is now Holmes County in 1809 and is credited as being the first white settler in the county. A street in Wooster is named in his honor and he lived in the area the remainder of his life. He is buried in a private cemetery in Holmes County. McCulloch Cemetery, near Holmesville, is located on a back road, beyond a field, in a thicket, on an Amish farm. We did not visit the cemetery this trip, although I understand that his tombstone has been replaced with a new military marker, noting his Revolutionary War service.

Near Walnut Creek, Holmes County, Ohio. (2014 photo by Karen)

Near Walnut Creek, Holmes County, Ohio. (2014 photo by Karen)

It rained several times during this week’s trip and it probably would have been a muddy mess to get across the field to the cemetery. Perhaps the next visit we will see Jonathan’s new tombstone.

Although this year’s trip was not intended to be a research trip, we did visit the little village of Baltic and walked through West Lawn Cemetery there. We drove through Mt. Vernon and through Centerburg, the geographical center of Ohio, the real Heart of Ohio. We took our time and took the scenic route home and marveled at the beautiful countryside where our ancestors once lived. In 2005 we visited Winesburg and Jonathan Grant’s grave. In the future we plan to visit New Philadelphia and Dover.

Cemetery, Tuscarawas County, Ohio. (2014 photo by Karen)

West Lawn Cemetery, Baltic, Ohio. (2014 photo by Karen)

[The following is the non-genealogy portion of this post.]

The rain. A couple of our recent trips have been rained out and this is becoming an unfortunate recurring theme for us. Last year we sat through a rain delay at the Great American Ball Park on the Fourth of July. After about four hours of nonstop rain, with no dry weather in sight, the ballgame was cancelled.

This week it rained most of Monday afternoon after we arrived in Berlin and we were drenched the next day in Sugarcreek. The rain stopped after that and we had beautiful weather for the rest of our trip.

Walnut Creek, Ohio. (2014 photo by Karen)

Walnut Creek, Ohio. (2014 photo by Karen)

A side trip was a detour through a very large marsh. A portion of Route 83 was closed between Wooster and Millersburg and we decided to make our own detour around the closed road. We turned onto the closest road before the road closing with the intent of going “around the block.” The problem is that roads do not make a square in hilly areas. Square blocks are for flat areas, like Mercer County.

The map showed that turning right would take us through Killbuck Marsh Wildlife Area. That sounded interesting. At first. We both like birds and other wildlife. I looked at the detour as an opportunity to see some unusual wildlife in the marsh.

As we drove into the marsh one concern was a sign warning of high water, cautioning travelers not to travel through the marsh during periods of heavy rain. Luckily the road was fairly dry and the rain came later.

It was a marsh all right, with lots of water and lily pads on both sides of the road. In other areas the woods enveloped both sides of the road. We became a little concerned when the pavement ended and we found ourselves driving on a narrow, half-gravel, half-dirt road, in a very forlorn and desolate area.

The only wildlife we saw as we drove through was a dead opossum and a couple buzzards. Eventually we came to pavement again and we did go “around the block.” Sort of.

We look forward to going back to the Holmes County area again in the near future.

Jul 08

Tombstone Tuesday–Hannah (Huey) Whiteman

Hannah (Huey) Whiteman, Cheshire Cemetery, Delaware County, Ohio. (2002 photo by Karen)

Hannah (Huey) Whiteman, Cheshire Cemetery, Delaware County, Ohio. (2002 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Hannah (Huey) Whiteman, located in Cheshire Cemetery, Berlin Township, Delaware County, Ohio. Her marker is inscribed:

HANNAH CHRISTIAN
WHITEMAN
—1850
CEM. 5 GR. 2

This plot in Cheshire Cemetery was not Hannah’s original burial site. She was originally buried in Berlin Township House Cemetery, Delaware County, and her first tombstone told more details about her.

Her original tombstone bore the inscription, Hannah, Whiteman, wife of Christian, d. 26 November 1850, age 77 years and 6 days. From that information her date of birth can be calculated as 20 November 1773.

The transcription of Hannah’s original tombstone was made in the 1940s by two women who wanted to record information from area cemeteries before a proposed dam would cover much of the area with water. The women compiled the transcriptions which were published years later by Esther W. Powell.

The two women also made a note concerning the transcriptions: The following inscriptions are from the stones still legible at the graves toward the north side of the lot, from the entrance, which is in the southeast corner. Whiteman, Hannah, wife of Christian, d. Nov. 26, 1850, ae 77y, 6d (b1773) [1] Thank goodness they had the foresight to record the information before it was destroyed forever.

This example also shows the importance of looking at old cemetery transcription books which may contain transcriptions of stones that no longer exist or inscriptions that are no longer legible.

Hannah Huey was born 20 November 1773 to James and Elizabeth Huey. She was probably born in Pennsylvania, quite possibly in Fayette County. She married Christian Whiteman about 1798 in Pennsylvania. They moved to the Fairfield/Pickaway County area of Ohio in about 1805.

Christian and Hannah had seven children:
James E. (1799-1873), married Mary North
Elizabeth (1800-1854), married Jacob Ekelberry
John (1803-?) married Sarah Smith
Mary (c1805-1855), married Isaac Huey
Christian (c1806-c1846), married Mary (Polly) Neigh
Haney (1809-1864), married Sarah Wilson
Anna (1811-1838), never married

Hannah’s husband Christian died in 1827 in Fairfield County, Ohio, and Hannah remained there for few years more. Eventually she went to live with her daughter Elizabeth in Delaware County. Elizabeth was married to Jacob Ekelberry.

Hannah died in Delaware County on 26 November 1850 and today rests near her daughter Elizabeth in Cheshire Cemetery. Cheshire Cemetery is located on Cheshire Road (County Road 72), between Gregory Road and Lackey Road. The cemetery was established in 1973 because of the Alum Creek Dam. Remains from several cemeteries were moved there.

Cheshire Cemetery, Berlin Township, Delaware County, Ohio. (2002 photo by Karen)

Cheshire Cemetery, Berlin Township, Delaware County, Ohio. (2002 photo by Karen)

We visited Cheshire Cemetery in 2002. Hannah’s marker is located at the back of the cemetery, in the old section. Her marker is in the far northwest corner, in a row bordering a field, and is the second marker from the end. A base sits next to Hannah’s marker and on the other side of the base is the marker of her daughter Elizabeth Ekelberry. Elizabeth’s husband Jacob is buried next to her.

 

[1] Esther Weygandt Powell, Tombstone Inscriptions and Other Records of Delaware County, Ohio, (Delaware Ohio Historical and Genealogical Society, 1972), 47.

Jul 04

Happy July 4th, 2014

Today is our nation’s birthday. The Fourth of July. Independence Day. The day we commemorate the adoption of the Declaration of Independence and celebrate America’s independence from Great Britain.

Resthaven Memory Gardens, Auglaize Co, Ohio. (2014 photo by Karen)

Resthaven Memory Gardens, Auglaize County Ohio. (2014 photo by Karen)

Today is a good time to honor the ancestors from our family who fought for American independence over 235 years ago. Joe and I both have Patriot Ancestors, although Joe has more than I do.

My patriot ancestor, Private Christian Whiteman, fought in the Pennsylvania Militia, the Berks County 6th Battalion. He was born 16 March 1762, probably in Pennsylvania, and died 23 December 1827 in Pickaway County, Ohio. He is buried in Reber Hill Cemetery, Pickaway County. I descend from Christian and his second wife Hannah Huey, and from their daughter Mary Whiteman, who married Isaac Huey. Christian is the ancestor I proved for membership in the DAR.

Christian Whiteman, Reber Hill Cemetery, Pickaway County, Ohio. (2002 photo by Karen)

Christian Whiteman, Reber Hill Cemetery, Pickaway County, Ohio. (2002 photo by Karen)

Private Jonathan Grant enlisted February 1776 in Pittsburgh, in Captain William Croghan’s Company of the 8th Virginia Rifle Regiment, commanded by Col. Abraham Bowman. He was discharged at Valley Forge during the winter of 1778 but later served another three months as a volunteer at the request of General Washington. During his war service he fought in the following battles: White Plains, Trenton, Brandywine, and Germantown, where he was wounded in the leg. [1] Jonathan was a surveyor in eastern Ohio in about 1807 and he resided there until his death. According to DAR and pension records Jonathan was born 16 July 1755 and died 27 July 1833 in Prairie Township, Holmes County, Ohio. Jonathan is buried in McCullough Cemetery, Holmes County. The cemetery is located on a private farm. We visited the cemetery in 2005 and saw Jonathan’s original tombstone, which I understand has recently been replaced. Joe descends from Jonathan and his second wife Sarah Kelley, and from their son Alexander Grant.

Jonathan Grant tombstone. (2003 photo by Karen)

Jonathan Grant tombstone, McCullough Cemetery, Holmes County, Ohio. (2005 photo by Karen)

Private Hugh Montgomery enlisted for three years in February 1777, serving in Captain James Sullivan’s Company of the 9th Virginia Regiment, commanded by Colonel Russell. He fought in the following battles: Long Island, White Plains, Trenton, Brandywine, and Valley Forge, under the command of Generals Broadhead and McIntosh. Hugh was wounded during the Revolutionary War, but later enlisted in the War of 1812 from Butler County, Ohio. [2] According to DAR applications Hugh was born 25 February 1754 in Ireland and died 20 May 1830 at Greensburg, Decatur County, Indiana. Joe descends from Hugh and his wife Eve Hartman, and from their daughter, Mary Montgomery. Mary married Alexander Grant, son of Jonathan Grant.

Samuel Bennett was born about 1747 and died in 1812 in Butler County, Ohio. Although it appears that Samuel has not been proved in the NSDAR, he likely fought in the Revolution. In 1934, at the age of 89, Eliza Flanagon, great-granddaughter of Samuel Bennett, wrote in her journal that Samuel was born in New Jersey and served throughout the Revolutionary War. Joe descends from Samuel and his wife Silence Platt, and from their son, John Bennett.

Joe and I may have other Revolutionary War Patriots in our family trees. Possible candidates for me might be the father of Nicholas Headington of Maryland or one of my Huey and/or Bryan ancestors from Pennsylvania. One of Joe’s Monroe ancestors may have fought in the American Revolution. I will just have to keep searching.

3684396632_34a663e190

Happy Birthday America! I wish everyone a happy and safe July 4th!

 

[1] Compiled Service Records of Soldiers Who Served in the American Army during the Revolutionary War, 1775-1783, NARA M881; and Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files, NARA Record Group 15, both on-line at Footnote.com.
[2] Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files, NARA Record Group 15.

 

Jul 01

Tombstone Tuesday–Christian Whiteman

Christian Whiteman, Reber Hill Cemetery, Pickaway County, Ohio. (2002 photo by Karen)

Christian Whiteman, Reber Hill Cemetery, Pickaway County, Ohio. (2002 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Christian Whiteman, located in Section 14 of Reber Hill Cemetery, Walnut Township, Pickaway County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

CHRISTIAN WHITEMAN
US ARMY
BERKS CO 6BN PA MIL
REVOLUTIONARY WAR
MAR 16, 1762   Dec 23, 1827

This Friday we celebrate Independence Day and I decided to write about Christian Whiteman, my  fifth great-grandfather on my dad’s side, who fought for America’s independence during the Revolutionary War. Christian is the ancestor that I proved for membership in The Daughters of the American Revolution.

Reber Hill Cemetery is located at 16810 Winchester Road, Ashville, Ohio, and we took a research trip there in 2002. The caretaker at Reber Hill has a file that includes many burial cards and, according to Christian Whiteman’s burial card, his remains were moved there on 14 September 1894.

Reber Hill Cemetery, Pickaway County, Ohio. (2002 photo by Karen.)

Reber Hill Cemetery, Pickaway County, Ohio. (2002 photo by Karen.)

The caretaker said that remains from several small local cemeteries had been moved to Reber Hill Cemetery. Christian’s burial card did not indicate where he was first buried. Perhaps he was first buried on or near one of the Whiteman properties in Pickaway or Fairfield County.

Christian Whiteman was born 16 March 1762, possibly in Berks County, Pennsylvania. Some speculate that he was born in Germany. The names of his parents are not known.

Christian was a private in the Berks County 6th Battalion, Pennsylvania Militia during the Revolution.

Christian married twice during his lifetime and both marriages took place in Pennsylvania. His first marriage may have been to Catherine Greiner. They had two children, Jacob (1795-1859) and Sarah (1796-?). Jacob, his wife, and son Henry are also buried at Reber Hill Cemetery, in the same Section as Christian.

Christian's son Jacob, Jacob's wife and son are also buried in Section 14. (2002 photo by Karen)

Christian’s son Jacob, Jacob’s wife and son are also buried in Section 14. (2002 photo by Karen)

Christian’s first wife died about 1796 and within a year or two he married Hannah Huey, in about 1798. Hannah was the daughter of James and Elizabeth Huey, of Fayette County, Pennsylvania. The growing Whiteman family remained in Pennsylvania for a few more years.

At some point Christian had moved to the western side of Pennsylvania, because he paid taxes in Georges Township, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, in 1798-99. [1]

Christian and his family were enumerated in Georges Township in 1800. In the household were 2 males 0-10, 1 male 10-16, 1 male 26-45, 1 female 0-10, and 1 female 26-45. [2] A few years later the Whitemans moved to Ohio.

Christian purchased over 300 acres of land in Fairfield County, Ohio, during 1804-1805 [3] and he probably moved his family there soon afterward. Christian was among the taxpayers in Amanda Township in 1806. [4] This tax does not prove that Christian actually lived in Fairfield County in 1806 since it was not a residence tax.

However, in 1810 Christian paid the Fairfield County Resident Tax, which indicates he was living there at that time. He owned 315 acres of land in Section 30, Township 13 [Amanda Township] and his Resident Tax was $3.15. [5]

The family remained in Amanda Township until Christian died on 23 December 1827. He was buried on or near the family farm but was moved to Reber Hill Cemetery about 60 years later.

Christian and Hannah had seven children:
James E. (1799-1873), married Mary North
Elizabeth (1800-1854), married Jacob Ekelberry
John (1803-?) married Sarah Smith
Mary (c1805-1855), married Isaac Huey
Christian (c1806-c1846), married Mary (Polly) Neigh
Haney (1809-1864), married Sarah Wilson
Anna (1811-1838), never married

Christian did not leave a will. He didn’t have to. He divided his land among his children before he died, leaving some very interesting land deeds that contain a lot of family information of genealogical interest. I also learned that Christian owned land in both Pickaway and Fairfield counties.

Christian’s widow Hannah (Huey) Whiteman died in 1850 and is buried in Cheshire Cemetery, Delaware County, Ohio.

I descend from Christian Whiteman’s daughter Mary, who married Isaac Huey. Mary and Isaac, along with some other members of Christian’s family, moved to Jay County, Indiana, a few years after Christian’s death. Christian and some of his descendants left some very interesting legal documents that give priceless genealogical information. I will write about them sometime.

Whiteman Section 14, Reber Hill Cemetery. (2002 photo by Karen)

Whiteman Section 14, Reber Hill Cemetery. (2002 photo by Karen)

 

[1] Fayette County, Pennsylvania Taxpayers, 1785-1799, T.L.C. Genealogy (Miami Beach, Florida, 1991), 167.

[2] 1800 U.S. Census, Georges, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, p. 554, line 5, Christian Whiteman; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 June 2014); from FHL film 363341, from NARA microfilm M32, Roll 38.

[3] Tract Book and Entries, Congress Lands 22 Ranges and U.S. Military Lands, Vol. 1, Auditor of State [Ohio], LOV 230:476, 480, microfilm #GR8285, Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, Ohio.

[4] Esther Weygandt Powell, compiler, Early Ohio Tax Records (1971; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland : Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1985), 102.

[5] Resident Duplicate for Fairfield County, Ohio, 1910, microfilm #GR2343, p. 1, Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, Ohio.

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