May 05

Tombstone Tuesday–Wilhelm A. Koch

William A. Koch, St. John's Lutheran Cemetery, Auglaize County, Ohio. (2015 photo by Karen)

Wilhelm A. Koch, St. John’s Lutheran Cemetery, Auglaize County, Ohio. (2015 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Wilhelm A. Koch, located in St. John’s Cemetery, Pusheta Township, Auglaize County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

PEACE BE THINE
Wilhelm A.
KOCH
Gest. den. 2, Apr 1906
Alter
37 J. 5 M. 22 T.
KOCH

Translation: Wilhelm A. Koch, died the 2 April 1906, age 37 years, 5 months, 22 days.

Wilhelm August Koch was born 10 October 1868 in Auglaize County, Ohio, the first child born to Johann J. and Christina Wilhelmina (Hoehammer) Koch. [1] Wilhelm’s parents married in about 1868 and they had at least eleven children. [2]

In 1880 Wilhelm lived with his parents and siblings in Pusheta Township, Auglaize County. In the household were John, 37; Christina, 32; William,1; Adam, 10; Lena, 7; Anna, 5; Edith, 3; and Laura, 1. Everyone in the family was born in Ohio and Wilhelm’s father was a farmer. [3]

Wilhelm Koch married Emilie Schumm on 13 September 1896 at Zion Lutheran Church, Schumm. Emilie was the daughter of William and Anna Maria (Heffner) Schumm.

I wrote a Tombstone Tuesday post about Emilie (Schumm) Koch several weeks ago and just last week we traveled over to Wapakoneta to get the tombstone photos for today’s post.

By 1900 Wilhelm and Emilie had one child, a daughter Clara, who was born in May 1898. The family lived on Benton Street in Wapakoneta, Duchouquet Township, where Wilhelm worked as a railroad section manager. The record indicates that Emilie had given birth to one child who was living. [4]

Wilhelm and Emilie were married only ten years when Wilhelm died in April 1906. I have not been able to find any details about his death. He may have died of an illness or as the result of an accident, perhaps even a railroad accident. Their fourth child was born in November of that same year.

Wilhelm was buried in St. John’s Lutheran Cemetery, located on Pusheta Road, southeast of Wapakoneta. St. John’s Lutheran Church, Missouri Synod, is nearby, where the Wilhelm Koch family were likely members.

This is a beautiful area, with a rolling landscape and quite a few ponds nearby. Pusheta Creek runs to the north of the church and cemetery. Glacier Hill Lakes is a few miles away.

Old St. John's Cemetery, Pusheta Rd, Auglaize County, Ohio. (2015 photo by Karen)

Old St. John’s Cemetery, Pusheta Rd, Auglaize County, Ohio. (2015 photo by Karen)

There are actually two cemeteries near St. John’s Lutheran Church. The oldest cemetery is to the east of the frame church and parsonage. It is on a hill overlooking Pusheta Creek and the beautiful farmland. All of the tombstones in this cemetery appear to be from the 19th century and the oldest markers we noticed were from the late 1880s.

I was in this old cemetery about 10 years ago when the Auglaize County Historical Society sponsored a weekend cemetery restoration workshop. Walt Walters, the Graveyard Groomer, from Connersville, Indiana, gave a hands-on demonstration of tombstone cleaning and restoration. During that same weekend I gave a tombstone art and cemetery research presentation as well as a tombstone rubbing demonstration.

St. John's Lutheran Cemetery, Auglaize County, Ohio. (2015 photo by Karen)

St. John’s Lutheran Cemetery, Auglaize County, Ohio. (2015 photo by Karen)

The newer cemetery, where Wilhelm Koch is buried, is about a quarter of a mile west of the church. The older section of this cemetery is to the east, and that is where Wilhelm, his infant child, and his parents are buried. Wilhelm is buried a short distance from his parents.

Tombstone of John & Christina Koch, William's parents, St. John's Cemetery, Auglaize County. (2015 photo by Karen)

Tombstone of John & Christina Koch, Wilhelm’s parents, St. John’s Cemetery, Auglaize County. (2015 photo by Karen)

Wilhelm and Emilie had four children, one of whom died in infancy. Their son Water was born seven months after his father’s death.

Wilhelm and Emilie had the following children:
Clara Maria (1898-1983), married Carl Reidenbach
Paula L. (1900-1991), married Harold E. Reidenbach
Unnamed infant (1904-1904)
“Walter” Theodor ((1906-1970), married Blanche Wickliffe

 

 

[1] Samuel Wilhelm August Koch entry, Find a Grave memorial no.90605956, FindAGrave.com (www.findagrave.com : accessed 29 March 2015). [10 Oct 1868-2 Apr 1906]

[2] 1900 U.S. Census, Duchouquet Township, Auglaize County, Ohio, ED 31, p.5A, dwelling 79, family 80, line 1, John J Koch; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 3 May 2015); from FHL microfilm 1241240, from NARA microfilm T623, roll 1240.

[3] 1880 U.S. Census, Pusheta Township, Auglaize County, Ohio, ED 10, p.479B, dwelling 73, family 76, line 1, John Koch; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 3 May 2015); from FHL microfilm 1254993, from NARA microfilm T9, roll 993.

[4] 1900 U.S. Census, Wapakoneta, Auglaize County, Ohio, ED 32, p.12A, dwelling 232, family 243, William A. Koch; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 March 2015); from FHL microfilm 1241240, from NARA microfilm T623, roll 1240.

May 01

Roads Are Beautiful at Chattanooga, Ohio

It happens less often than once in a blue moon but a Chattanooga, Ohio, postcard was up for bid on Ebay last weekend. It must have been my lucky day because it was a Buy Now item and I was able to purchase it immediately.

I could tell right away that the picture on the postcard was not an actual photo of Chatt. You can see and judge for yourself. Chatt and the surrounding area are beautiful, but flat. No rolling hills or mountains off in the distance in any direction. The area is just flat farmland.

Chattanooga, Ohio, postcard postmarked 1914

Chattanooga, Ohio, postcard postmarked 1914

But the postcard did have Chattanooga, Ohio, printed on it and Chatt postcards seem to be very hard to come by.

Besides, I was more interested in reading the writing on the back.

I was not disappointed.

This 1914 postcard may have been postmarked at Chatt, where there once was a post office, located in Egger’s store that stood just south of the Chatt Bar. We will never know because the postmaster nearly missed stamping the postcard, leaving just half a postmark. The only portion of the postmark visible is an O or a D, half of the number 27, Ohio, and the time and date–7 PM 1914. Thank goodness the postcard writer wrote the complete date with her message.

Her message was rather informative, not just the usual How are you? We are fine. Come visit us soon. Instead, she wrote about the bad winter weather and mentioned the funeral of a neighbor lady.

Right away I had to know—who wrote the postcard? Was she from Chatt? Who was the recipient? Who was the deceased person whose funeral had to be postponed because of bad weather?

Of course the writer may not have been from Chatt at all. Who knows where she might have obtained this postcard. Trying to identify  the women could turn out to be a wild goose chase.

But I had to know. So I started my search with the clues I had.

The postcard was addressed to Miss Thresa Manges, RFD, Warsaw, Indiana. The message to Thresa:

Feb 27, 1914
Dear Cousin,

How are you all? We are as well as usual. Did you have any snow out there this week? We surely did out here. The mail carriers could not go for two days and our neighbor lady died and they had to postpone the funeral for a day. They used the snow plows on the roads and then they could hardly get through with a buggy. Must close. Hoping you will come out as soon as school is out.

Write soon.
Bertha L.

Chattanooga, Ohio, postcard postmarked 1914, from Bertha to her cousin Theresa.

Chattanooga, Ohio, postcard postmarked 1914, from Bertha to her cousin Theresa.

It did not take long to learn that Theresa Grace Manges was the daughter of David and Margaret (Leininger) Manges. Theresa was born 22 May 1897 in Bourbon, Indiana. She married Lemuel Miles Cleveland on 24 March 1919 at Etna Green, Kosciusko County, Indiana. [1]

From that marriage record I learned that Theresa’s mother was a Leininger. That is most definitely a Chatt name. The postcard was from her cousin Bertha L. Possibly Bertha Leininger?

Who was Bertha? Where did Bertha live? Who were her neighbors?

Next I wanted to learn a little more about Theresa’s mother, Margaret (Leininger) Manges, to see if I could find a relationship between Margaret and Bertha. Since Bertha was Theresa’s cousin, a parent of each may have been siblings. Or not.

Margaret E. Leininger married David Manges on 21 November 1896 in Kosciusko County, Indiana, married by Wm T. Townsend, JP. Margaret’s father gave his consent so his name was on the marriage record: “J.G. Leininger, father of the girl.” [2]

Then I searched for Bertha Lininger in Mercer County in the 1900 census. Bingo! Bertha C. Leininger, daughter of Theobald and Caroline F. Leininger, lived on a farm in Blackcreek Township with her parents and three brothers. In the household: Theobald, 38; Caroline F, 37; Henry L, 13; Edwin A, 8; Bertha C, 5; and Samuel J, 2. Bertha was born in about 1895 so she would have been nearly the same age as her cousin Theresa. [3]

Theobald Lininger and his family lived on Strable Road, east of route 49, in Section 32. They lived on the south edge of Blackcreek Township, on the Blackcreek/Liberty Township line, and they lived very close to Chatt.

But how were Bertha and Theresa related? And who was the neighbor lady that had recently died?

To make a long story short, once I got that far I checked Find a Grave was able to fit the pieces together and figure out the relationship between the two cousins.

The writer of the postcard was very likely Bertha Leininger, daughter of Theobald L. & Carolyn (Kable) Leininger. [4] Bertha eventually married LeRoy Pifer and they had children Beatrice, Ruby, Glenda, Donna Ruth, and Gerald LeRoy. I knew and remember some of these people.

It turns out that Bertha and Theresa were actually second cousins and their common ancestor was John Leininger (1801-1868). Bertha descended from John’s son Jacob L. and Theresa descended from John George, another of John’s sons.

Bertha’s line: John Leininger was the father of Jacob L. Jacob L. was the father of Theobald L. and Theobald L. was the father of our subject, Bertha C. [5]

Theresa’s line: John Leininger was the father of John George. John George was the father of Margaret and Margaret was the mother of Theresa. [5]

I wondered if and how Theodore “Teddy” Leininger (1895-1992) fit in with this family. I learned that Teddy’s father was John Jacob Leininger, who was a brother to Theobald L, the father of Bertha. So Teddy and Bertha were first cousins.

But, who was the woman who died, whose funeral had to be postponed because of heavy snow?

I discovered two women from the Chatt area had died about the time the postcard was written. One was buried four days after her death and a few days before the postcard was written.

Emma Landfair died at 8:45 a.m. on 21 February 1914 and was buried in Kessler Cemetery on the 25th, buried a day later than the customary three days. She was the daughter of Henry and Mary (Duer) Kuhn. [6]

The other woman was Carolyn Baker, who died 21 January 1914 and was buried in the UCC cemetery on the 24th. [7]

Which woman was Bertha talking about? Both women lived about a mile from the Leiningers. In 1910 Carolyn Baker was living with her son Charles W. Baker in Section 30, on northwest corner of routes 49 and 707. [8] Emma Landfair lived in Section 29, about a half mile east of route 49 on route 707.

According to 1914 weather reports January’s weather was mild with some precipitation in the northern counties, while February’s weather was very cold with a lot of snow. Most Ohio counties received unusually heavy snowfall after the first week of February and there was a particularly bad snowstorm on 22-23 February. Most of Ohio received at least 6-10 inches, with drifts from 6-8 feet. The ground on all parts of the state was covered with snow from the 13th until the end of the month of February. [9]

Plus, Bertha asked her cousin if she “had any snow out there this week,” which would seem to indicate she was talking about a snowstorm that very week, in February.

My guess would be that Bertha was talking about Emma Landfair, but of course it may even have been someone else she was referring to.

I learned a lot from these few sentences on this old postcard.

Note: Images of all 36 Section maps from the 1910 Decennial Appraisement of Blackcreek Township are now on this website, on the home page, under the Mercer County Maps header, in the Blackcreek Township drop-down.

 

[1] “Indiana, Marriages, 1811-1959,” index and images, FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org : accessed 30 April 2015), Lemuel Miles Cleveland and Theresa Grace Manges, 24 March 1919; citing Etna Green, Kosciusko, Indiana, county clerk offices, Vol. Y (1917-1919), p.5465; from FHL microfilm 1311140.

[2] “Indiana, Marriages, 1811-1959,” index and images, FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org : accessed 30 April 2015), David Mangis and Margaret E Leininger, 21 Nov 1896; citing Kosciusko, Indiana, county clerk offices, Vol. K (1894-1898), p.363; from FHL microfilm 1311133.

[3] 1900 U.S. Census, Black Creek, Mercer County, Ohio, ED 74, p.15A, dwelling/family 303, line 13, Theowald Leininger; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 30 April 2015); from FHL microfilm 1241303, from NARA microfilm T623, roll 1303.

[4] “Ohio, County Births, 1841-2003,” index and images, FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org : accessed 30 April 2015), Bertha C. Leininger, 14 Apr 1895; citing Birth, Blackcreek Township, Mercer County, Ohio, Vol. 3, p.117, county courthouses, Ohio; from FHL microfilm 914953.

[5] Find A Grave memorial 27825053, created by Mike Dearbaugh; John Leininger (1801-1868), buried in Zion State Line Cemetery, Padua, Mercer County, Ohio; Find A Grave (www.findagrave.com : accessed 30 April 2015).

[6] “Ohio, Deaths, 1908-1953,” index and images, FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org : accessed 30 April 2015), Emma Landfair, 21 Feb 1914; citing Liberty, Mercer, Ohio; from FHL microfilm 1953828.

[7] “Ohio, Deaths, 1908-1953,” index and images, FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org : accessed 30 April 2015), Caroline Bollenbacher Baker, 20 Jan 1914; citing Liberty, Mercer, Ohio; from FHL microfilm 1953825.

[8] 1910 U.S. Census, Black Creek, Mercer County, Ohio, ED 107, p.1B, dwelling/family 14, line, Charles W. Baker; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 30 April 2015); from FHL microfilm 1375227, from NARA microfilm T624, roll 1214.

[9] J. Warren Smith, Climatological Data: Ohio Section, U.S. Department of Agriculture Weather Bureau, Charles F. Marvin, Columbus, Ohio, Weather Bureau Office, Vol. XIX, February 1914 (Columbus, Ohio : 1914), 3, 11; Google Books (https://books.google.com : accessed 30 April 2015).

 

 

 

Apr 28

Tombstone Tuesday–Conrad & Emma (Merkle) Heffner

Conrad & Emma Heffner, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanoota, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

Conrad & Emma Heffner, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Conrad and Emma (Merkle) Heffner, located in row 10 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

HEFFNER

Mother
Emma
1874-1950

Father
Conrad
1867-1951

Conrad Heffner was born 29 April 1867 in Mercer County, Ohio, the son of George and Sophia (Martin) Heffner. He was baptized 26 May 1867 at Zion Chatt, with Conrad and Margaretha Heffner, serving as his sponsors. His sponsors were his uncle and aunt and his uncle Conrad was his father’s brother.

Conrad [today’s subject] grew up on the family farm in Blackcreek Township just west of Chatt, very near the Indiana state line.

Conrad Heffner married Emma Merkle on 27 October 1897 at Zion Chatt, married by Zion’s pastor Rev. August Affeld. The church record indicates they were both from Mercer County, although the Merkles lived in Auglaize County before moving to the Chattanooga area. Emma’s surname was spelled “Merkly” in the church record and “Merkley” in their county marriage record. [1]

Emma Merkle was born 4 December 1874, the daughter of Joseph and Lucinda (Kantner) Merkle. Emma was probably born in Auglaize County, where the family lived in 1870 and were enumerated as Merkley. In 1870 the household consisted of Joseph, 34; Lucinda, 26; Mary M., 9; Elizabeth, 4; Anna, 2; and John, 5 months. [2]

The Merkles moved in or near Chattanooga between 1874 and 1876. There they attended Zion Lutheran Church where Emma and her older brother Friedrich were both baptized on 23 September 1876, with Jacob Deitsch as their sponsor. Emma was confirmed 6 May 1888 by Rev. Karl Adam, Jr. Both her baptism and confirmation records give the names of her parents.

Soon after their marriage Conrad and Emma lived in Blackcreek Township, where Conrad farmed. He owned his farm and in the household were Conrad, 33; Emma, 25; their son Walter E, 1; and Edward Bausser, 20, a boarder who helped on the farm. [3]

The Conrad Heffner family had moved to Adams County, Indiana, by 1910. The couple had been married 13 years and had 2 children, Walter, 12, and Bernice, 6. Conrad owned his farm and their son Walter helped farm it. [4]

Conrad and Emma likely remained on their Indiana farm the rest of their lives. It appears their farm was on the Indiana/Ohio state line and Conrad was still farming at age 73. [5]

Conrad and Emma had the following children:
Walter Edward (1898-1974), married Vera P. Schenk
Vera “Bernice” (1903-1994), married Victor L. Stuckey

According to Zion Chatt’s records Emma Heffner died 11 May 1950 at the Adams County Memorial Hospital in Decatur, Indiana, at the age of 75 years, 5 months, and 7 days. She died of heart failure and complications from a gall bladder operation. She was buried on the 11th, with Rev. Waldo Byers in charge of the funeral service. She was survived by her husband Conrad, daughter Mrs. Bernice Stuckey, son Walter Heffner, brothers Edward, William, and Leo, a sister Mrs. Mary Feeger, 3 grandchildren, and 2 great-grandchildren.

According to Zion Chatt’s records Conrad died of a heart attack on 20 January 1951, at the age of 83 years, 8 months and 21 days. He was buried on the 23rd, with Rev. Waldo Byers in charge of his funeral service. He was survived by daughter Bernice Stuckey, son Walter, grandsons Waldo and Elbert Stuckey, and James Heffner, as well as 2 great-grandsons.

 

[1] “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” index and images, FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org : accessed 26 April 2015), Conrad Heffner and Emma Merkley, 27 Oct 1897; citing Mercer, Ohio, marriages, Vol.7, p.279, from FHL microfilm 914957.

[2] 1870 U.S. Census, Wapakoneta, Auglaize County, Ohio, p. 36 (penned), dwelling 304, family 298, Joseph Merkley; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 May 2014); from FHL film 552671, from NARA film M593, roll 1172.

[3] 1900 U.S. Census, Black Creek, Mercer County, Ohio, ED 74, p.15A, dwelling/family 306, Conrad Heffner; digital image Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 26 April 2015); from FHL microfilm 1241303, from NARA microfilm T623, roll 1303.

[4] 1910 U.S. Census, Jefferson, Adams County, Indiana, ED 4, p.2B, dwelling/family 42, Conrad Heffner; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 26 April 2015); from FHL microfilm 1374351, from NARA microfilm T624, roll 338.

[5] 1940 U.S. Census, Jefferson, Adams County, Indiana, ED 1-4, p.4A, line 9, Comod Heffner; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 26 April 2015); from NARA microfilm T627, roll 1024. [Indexed as Comod Heffner on Ancestry.com]

Apr 24

The Old Chattanooga Barber Shop Revisited

A couple years ago I wrote about Chatt’s old barber shop, a frame building that once stood north of the Fisher Hardware, between the homes of Luther & Gladys Fisher and Carl & Marcella Schroeder. [1]

Sometime around WWII the structure was moved into the woods on Schaadt Road, about ½ mile east of route 49. They re-purposed the building and it became the home of Ester Baker and her family.

I took a photo of the dilapidated building in 2013. Although the trees were not leafed out it is still very difficult to see through the underbrush and tree trunks.

Old Chattanooga Barbershop. (2013 photo by Karen)

Old Chatt barber shop. (2013 photo by Karen)

A few months ago a couple of my cousins shared a photo of the old barber shop during the time it was a residence for the Bakers. The photo was taken back in the early 1950s and their “house” was painted white at that time.

Chatt Barbershop, c1953. Photo submitted.

Chatt barber shop, c1953. Photo submitted.

My cousins lived across the road from the Bakers and played with Ester’s children Gloria and Red, shown below. The third child in the photo below may be my cousin.

Ester Baker & children, unknown date. Submitted photo.

Ester Baker & children, unknown date. Photo submitted.

Below is a more recent photo of the barber shop that became a home, taken a few years ago.

Old Chatt barbershop, converted into a home. Photo submitted.

Old Chatt barber shop, converted into a home. Photo submitted.

Old Chatt barbershop, converted into a home. Photo submitted.

Old Chatt barber shop, once used as a home. Photo submitted.

This would have been a very small home by modern standards and poorly insulated, if at all. But a family’s home nonetheless.

 

[1] “Shave and a Haircut…Tow Bits,” http://www.karenmillerbennett.com/chattanooga/shave-and-a-haircut-two-bits/ , Karen’s Chatt,  posted 12 April 2013.

Apr 21

Tombstone Tuesday–Oscar A. & Hilda M. (Schumm) Schumm

Oscar A. & Hilda M. (Schumm) Schumm, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Van Wert County, Ohio. (2012 photo by Karen)

Oscar A. & Hilda M. (Schumm) Schumm, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Van Wert County, Ohio. (2012 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Oscar A. and Hilda M. (Schumm) Schumm, located in row 7 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm, Van Wert County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

SCHUMM
Oscar A.
Oct. 31, 1890
Feb. 2, 1984

Hilda M.
Sept. 12, 1883
Sept. 28, 1974

Oscar Albert Schumm was born 31 October 1890 near Schumm, in Willshire Township, to William and Anna Maria (Heffner) Schumm. He was baptized on 9 November 1890 at Zion Schumm with J.F. Schumm and Martin Schinnerer I as his baptismal sponsors.

Oscar married Hilda Schumm on 1 November 1914 at Zion Schumm, married by Rev. George J. Meyer. Witnesses to their marriage were Arnold Schumm and Salome Schumm.

Hilda Marie Schumm was born on 12 September 1883 near Schumm to John Christian and Wilhelmina (Breuninger) Schumm. She was baptized with her twin sister Lydia on 23 September 1883 at Zion Schumm. Their baptismal sponsors were Mrs. Sarah Schumm, Mrs. Rosine Schinnerer, Mrs. Hannah German, and Margaretha Buechner.

If you recall last week’s Tombstone Tuesday post you will notice that brothers married sisters in these two families. Oscar and Paul were brothers and Hilda and Lydia were twin sisters.

After their marriage the couple lived east of Willshire where Oscar farmed. In 1920 they had one daughter, Hildred. Oscar was 29, Hilda, 36, and daughter Hildred W.M., 3. [1]

In 1930 the family lived in the home they owned on the northeast corner of Route 81 and Schumm road. Six were living in the household: Oscar, 39; Hilda 46; Hildred, 13; Harold, 8; Roman, 5; and Maria, a 74 year-old widow. Although Maria was listed as a daughter on the enumeration, she was Oscar’s mother, Anna Maria (Heffner) Schumm. She would pass away the next spring, in March of 1931. [2]

Oscar and Hilda remained in the same house when the 1940 census was enumerated. In the household with them were their three children Hildred, Harold, and Roman. [3]

Hilda Schumm died of a heart attack in or near Convoy, Tully Township, Van Wert County, on 28 September 1974, at the age of 91 years. She was buried on 1 October. [4]

Oscar Schumm died of sepsis from multiple ulcers on 2 February 1984 at the Van Wert County Hospital. He was 93 years of age. His occupation was farmer. He was buried on 6 February. [5]

Oscar and Hilda had the following children:
Hildred Wilhelmina (1916-2004)
Harold Paul (1921-1988), married Leahline Pearl Case
Roman Curtis (1924-1988)

 

[1] 1920 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 146, dwelling 59, family 60, p.3B, Oscar A. Schumm; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 April 2015); from NARA microfilm T625, roll 1446.

[2] 1930 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 24, p.2B, dwelling 42, family 43, Oscar Schumm; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com, (www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 April 2015), from FHL microfilm 2341624, from NARA microfilm T626, roll 1890.

[3] 1940 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 81-28, p.4B, house 26, Oscar Schumm; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 April 2015); from NARA microfilm T627, roll 3163.

[4] “Ohio, County Death Records, 1840-2001,” index and images, FarmilySearch (www.familysearch.org : accessed 18 April 2015), Hilda M. Schumm, 28 Sep 1974; citing Death, Tully Township, Van Wert, Ohio, item 15 cn 215, County courthouses, Ohio; from FHL microfilm 1952884.

[5] “Ohio, County Death Records, 1840-2001,” index and images, FarmilySearch (www.familysearch.org : accessed 18 April 2015), Oscar A. Schumm, 2 Feb 1984; citing Death, Pleasant Township, Van Wert, Ohio, item 3 cn 21, County courthouses, Ohio; from FHL microfilm 1952886.

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