Jan 14

Tombstone Tuesday–Richard & Loretta (Aumann) Allmandinger

Richard & Loretta (Aumann) Allmandinger, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Van Wert County, Ohio. (2012 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Richard and Loretta (Aumann) Allmandinger, located in row 2 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm, Van Wert County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

ALLMANDINGER
Richard
1898-1982
Loretta
1908-1993

Richard Edward Allmandinger was born 3 October 1898 in Mercer County, Ohio, the son of William (1867-1919) and Barbara (Hoehamer) (1877-1929) Allmandinger. Richard was baptized at Zion Chatt on 23 October 1898, with his parents serving has his sponsors.

The William Allmandinger family lived in Black Creek Township, Mercer County, and attended Zion Lutheran Church at Chatt until they moved to Willshire Township, Van Wert County, in about 1904. After their move to Van Wert County they attended Zion Lutheran Church at Schumm. William and Barbara had a family of twelve children and some of them were baptized at Zion Chatt and the others were baptized at Zion Schumm.

The William Allmandinger household in 1900, living in Mercer County: William C, 32; Barbara S, 22; Richard E, 1; Walter L, 3 months; and Henry Grepner, 29, boarder. The father William was a farmer. [1]

The William Allmandinger household in 1910, living in Van Wert County: William, 43; Barbara, 33; Richard, 11; Walter, 10; Marie, 9; Caroline, 8; Bertha, 6; Hugo, 4; Fredrick, 2; Lila, 3 months ; and Leroy Lautzenheiser, 20, servant/farm work. [2]  

The father William died in 1919. His widow Barbara with their children in 1920: Barbara S, 42; Richard E, 21; Walter L, 19; Marie M, 18; Caroline K, 17; Bertha M, 16; Hugo J, 13; Fredrick N, 12; Lillie L, 9; Minnie l, 8; Martin W, 6; Aaron L, 2; and Anna B, 2. [3]

Son Richard Allmandinger married Frieda Schumm at Zion Schumm on 15 January 1924. Frieda (1893-1945) was the daughter of Louis J. (1851-1938) and Sarah (Breuninger) (1861-1921) Schumm. Frieda was my great aunt, the sister of my grandfather Cornelius Schumm.

After their marriage, Richard and Frieda Allmandinger lived east of Willshire and they had one son, Louis, born in September 1925.

The Richard Allmandinger household in 1930, with two of Richard’s brothers living with them: Richard, 31; Frieda, 36; Louis, 4; Friedrich, 23; and Martin, 17. Richard farmed. [4]

The Richard Allmandinger household in 1940: Richard, 41; Frieda, 46; Louis, 14; and Arthur Germann, 21, servant. [5]

Richard’s wife Frieda (Schumm) Allmandinger died 16 April 1945 and is buried next to Richard and his second wife.

Widower Richard Allmandinger married Loretta Aumann on 21 October 1946 in Adams County, Indiana. [6]

Loretta Aumann was born 2 October 1908 in Adams County, Indiana, the daughter of Henry John and Mathalda S. (Scheumann) Aumann. The Henry Aumann family in 1910: Henry, 29; Mathilda, 27; and Loretta, 1. Her father Henry was a farmer. [7] And the Henry Aumann family in 1920: Henry JF, 38; Mathilda M, 36; Loretta MS, and Norbert WC, 9. [8]

Loretta lived at home with her parents for the next 2 decades and in 1940 worked for an electrical manufacturing company. City directories indicate that she worked at GE in Fort Wayne. The Henry Aumann household in 1940: Henry J, 58; Mathilda, 56; Loretta, 37; and Elinor, 15. [9]

Richard Allmandinger died of renal failure and complications from a vascular disease at Van Wert Manor on 26 November 1982, at the age of 84. He was buried on 30 November. His occupation was given as farmer. [10]

Loretta (Aumann) Allmandinger remained in Willshire area, on State Route 81, after Richard’s death. She died from a subdural hematoma and pneumonia at Parkview Memorial Hospital, Fort Wayne, on 4 June 1993. She was buried on 9 June. [11]

Richard and Loretta did not have any children of their own.

[1] 1900 U.S. Census, Black Creek, Mercer, Ohio, ED 74, p.10A, dwelling 200, family 200, William C. Almandinger; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/7602/ : viewed 9 June 2013).

[2] 1910 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 114, p.4B, dwelling 79, family 80, line Wm. Allmandinger; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/7884/ : viewed 9 June 2013).

[3] 1920 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, PD 146, p.3A, dwelling 52, family, 53, Barbara S Allmindinger; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/6061/ : viewed 10 Jan 2020).

[4] 1930 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 24, p.2B, dwelling 38, family 39, Richard Almandinger; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/6224/ : viewed 6 Jan 2020).

[5] 1940 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 81-28, p.4A, line 32, Rich Almadinger; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/2442/ : viewed 6 Jan 2020).

[6] Adams County, Indiana, Marriages, Vol. V:369, Richard E Allmandinger & Loretta Aumann, 21 Oct 1946; “Indiana Marriages, 1811-2007,” Family Search.org (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-6315-8W?i=384&cc=1410397&personaUrl=%2Fark%3A%2F61903%2F1%3A1%3AXXJ1-51M : viewed 6 Jan 2020).

[7] 1910 U.S. Census, Root, Adams, Indiana, ED 9, p.12A, dwelling 228, family 231, Henry Aumann; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/7884/ : viewed 10 Jan 2020).

[8] 1920 U.S. Census, Root, Adams, Indiana, ED 10, p.6A, dwelling 59, family 60, Henry JF Aumann; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/6061/ : viewed 10 Jan 2020).

[9] 1940 U.S. Census, Root, Adams, Indiana, ED 1-16, p.7B, household 123, Henry J Aumann; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/2442/ : viewed 10 Jan 2020).

[10] “Ohio, County Death Records, 1840-2001,” Pleasant Twp, Van Wert County, Richard C Allmandinger, 26 Nov 1982; database with images, FamilySearch.org (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-64V6-SV?i=2232&cc=2128172&personaUrl=%2Fark%3A%2F61903%2F1%3A1%3AF6VT-WJG : viewed 10 Jan 2020).

[11] Indiana Archives and Records Administration, Death Certificates, 1993, Roll 9, Loretta Allmandinger 4 Jun 1993; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com.  

Jan 10

The Passing of Darrel “Pete” Brewster

Sadly, earlier this week I read about the passing of Darrel “Pete” Brewster, professional football legend and one of my distant cousins.

Darrel Pete Brewster, July 2014.

Darrel Burton Brewster, later nicknamed Pete, was born in 1930 in Adams County, Indiana, and grew up in Portland, Indiana, where he excelled in basketball and football. After high school he attended Purdue University, where he again excelled in football. After graduating from Purdue he was drafted into the NFL and played professional football for the Browns and Steelers. He later coached for the Vikings and Chiefs and received his Super Bowl ring in 1970, while coaching for the Chiefs. He played and worked with some big names in football back then, including Paul Brown, Buddy Parker, and Hank Stram. And unlike football players today, he played on offense, defense, and special teams because the teams needed players.

Pete Brewster football card, signed by “Pete” on 16 July 2014. (2014 photo by Karen)

I met Pete once a few years ago and wrote a blog post about the meeting. [1] We had lunch with him in Portland and it was interesting to hear him talk about his football days. He also talked about his late wife Vivian (Hummel) and his family. His wife Vivian had passed away 2012 and I could tell he missed her very much.  

Pete was a very nice, Christian man, who also loved music and had a great sense of humor. He was what you would call a gentleman. He was a humble man with an interesting career.   

I talked to him a couple times on the phone after that lunch. We were going to meet up with him at the Portland Engine Show sometime, but we never did. He would sometimes attend the Brewster reunion but I usually had a conflict with the Schumm reunion, which is held on the same day.

Pete told me that he didn’t know much about his Brewster family history but he was interested in learning about the family. That was one thing that I could help him with that day at lunch and I gave him some family group sheets and photos. That was the least I could do since he let me try on his Super Bowl ring. 

Pete was my first cousin twice removed, meaning that he was my grandma Gertrude (Brewster) Miller’s first cousin. Their fathers were half-brothers, sons of Daniel Brewster, but the half-brothers had different mothers. I descend from Daniel and Sara (Fetters) and Pete descended from Daniel and Mary Loverda (Bebout).  

Pete died near his home in Peculiar, Missouri, on 3 January 2020. There will be a Celebration of Life service there on 11 January. You can read his full obituary at https://www.atkinsonfuneralhome.com/obituary/darrel-pete-brewster

Pete was the last surviving sibling of the five children of Frederick Emerson and Nellie Emma (Bricker) Brewster. 

With Pete’s passing we lost a special man and a piece of football history.

Rest in peace, Darrel “Pete” Brewster.

[1]Lunch with Darrel ‘Pete’ Brewster,“ Karen’s Chatt, 18 Jul 2014 and “Pete Brewster-Professional Football Player,” Karen’s Chatt, 12 Oct 2012.

Jan 07

Tombstone Tuesday–Frieda E. (Schumm) Allmandinger

Frieda E. Allmandinger, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Van Wert County, Ohio. (2012 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Frieda E. (Schumm) Allmandinger, located in row 2 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm, Van Wert County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

ALLMANDINGER
Frieda E.
1893-1945

Frieda Elsie Schumm was born in Willshire Township on 16 November 1893, the daughter of Louis J. and Sarah (Breuninger) Schumm Frieda was baptized at home on 30 November 1893, with Mrs. Martin Schinnerer and Mrs. John Schumm as her sponsors.

Frieda was my great aunt, the older sister of my grandfather Cornelius Schumm (1896-1986).

Frieda, Sarah (Breuninger), Cornelius, Louis J Schumm (1905)

The Louis J. Schumm family in 1900, living about 2 miles east of Willshire: Louis J, 48; Sarah, 39; Frieda, 6; and Cornelius, 2. All were born in Ohio, except for Sarah, who was born in Wisconsin. Louis was a farmer. [1]

Louis J. and Sarah had another child, Curtis, born in September 1900, who died in November 1901.

Frieda resided at home, with her parents and brother Cornelius, for the next 20 years.

Frieda Schumm married Richard Allmandinger at Zion Lutheran, Schumm, on 15 January 1924.  Both were from Zion Schumm’s parish and they were married by Rev. R.O. Bienert. Walter Allmandinger and Salome Schumm were the witnesses at their wedding.

Richard & Frieda (Schumm) Allmandinger (1893-1945) d/o Louis J Schumm

Richard Allmandinger (1898-1982) was the son of William (1867-1919) and Barbara (Hoehamer) (1877-1929) Allmandinger. At one time the William Allmandinger family lived north of Chatt, in Blackcreek Township, Mercer County, and attended Zion Lutheran Church in Chatt. Around 1904 they moved to Van Wert County and transferred their membership Zion Lutheran Church at Schumm. 

After their marriage, Richard and Frieda (Schumm) Allmandinger lived east of Willshire, where they had a son, Louis, born in September 1925.

Louis J, Cornelius Schumm, Richard, Louis, Frieda (Schumm) Allmandinger

The Richard Allmandinger household in 1930, with two of Richard’s brothers living with them: Richard, 31; Frieda, 36; Louis, 4; Friedrich, 23; and Martin, 17. Richard farmed. [2]

The Richard Allmandinger household in 1940: Richard, 41; Frieda, 46; Louis, 14; and Arthur Germann, 21, servant. [3]

Frieda (Schumm) Allmandinger died 16 April 1945 at the Van Wert County Hospital, at the age of 51 years and 5 months. She had been hospitalized for two weeks and died of an embolism following a hysterectomy. Frieda was buried on the 19th. Rev. A. Moeller was in charge of her funeral service.

Frieda’s widowed husband Richard married Loretta Aumann (1908-1993) on 21 October 1946 in Adams County, Indiana. [4] Loretta was the daughter of Henry John and Mathilda S. (Scheumann) Aumann. Richard and Loretta are buried next to Frieda.  

Richard and Frieda (Schumm) Allmandinger had one son:
“Louis“ William (1925-2013), married Betty A. Hockemeyer  

[1] 1900 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 97, p.8, dwelling 167, family 175, Louis J. Schumm; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/7602/ : viewed 6 Jan 2020).

[2] 1930 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 24, p.2B, dwelling 38, family 39, Richard Almandinger; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/6224/ : viewed 6 Jan 2020).

[3] 1940 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, ED 81-28, p.4A, line 32, Rich Almsdinger; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/2442/ : viewed 6 Jan 2020).

[4] Adams County, Indiana, Marriages, Vol. V:369, Richard E Allmandinger & Loretta Aumann, 21 Oct 1946; “Indiana Marriages, 1811-2007,” Family Search.org (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-6315-8W?i=384&cc=1410397&personaUrl=%2Fark%3A%2F61903%2F1%3A1%3AXXJ1-51M : viewed 6 Jan 2020).

Jan 03

Miller Family Haircuts

To the average person these two items simply look like a pair of old rusty hair scissors and clippers, but to the Miller children living on Sipe Road in the 1930s they were considered instruments of torture.

Old Miller scissors and clippers.

Carl and Gertrude (Brewster) Miller, my grandparents, raised their family of eight children on the family farm a couple miles north of Chattanooga, Ohio. Just about everyone in the area was poor during the depression and going to a beauty shop or barber shop would have been a luxury. Instead, Carl, not his wife Gertrude, always cut his children’s hair himself.

The thing was, Carl was a farmer, not a barber. Carl’s brother-in-law and neighbor Howard Caffee was a barber in Chatt, but Carl took on the job as the Miller family barber, much to his children’s dismay.

My aunts and uncles have never forgotten those haircuts. And their memories are not fond ones.

Someone saved these old scissors and clippers all these years and I ended up with them. They are rusted, frozen up, and will not move one little bit. I showed them to my two uncles a few months ago and they recognized both items right off. The first thing they said was, “Dad cut our hair and it hurt!”   

The classic Miller haircut. Herb, Ann, Keny, & Vernie.

Their father Carl was a busy man. He was a farmer with many chores to tend to and he also worked at Central Soya in Decatur. He was handy and could build and fix things around the farm. All this kept him busy and he likely didn’t have a lot of time to spend as the family hairdresser.

It probably took a while to cut the hair of eight children. Carl likely didn’t like the monthly family haircuts any more than his children and I am sure his young children tried his patience. But he was strong-willed and you couldn’t get away with much when he was in charge.

Carl had a routine for his haircuts. First he would place a crock or some other item on a chair to elevate the child to a comfortable hair-cutting height for him. Then he began.

He was in a hurry to get the job done and his haircuts hurt. My uncles said the main reason the haircuts hurt was because Carl pulled the clippers away before all the hair was cut. The clippers pulled their hair and it hurt!

And they dared not complain about any discomfort or pain. Complaining would just perturb their father and make the whole procedure even worse. 

Carl had his own particular haircut style for the boys–his signature haircut–crooked across the forehead, slanting up on the right. It looks somewhat like a bowl-cut, but he did not use a bowl. The boys’ hair was cut shorter than the girls’ and the girls got bangs.

Carl Miller family. Boys with Carl’s signature haircut.

All the Miller children had straight hair and my Aunt Ruth recalls that their father complained that her hair was like wire. Although Carl also cut the girls’ hair, they did not get perms back then.

When one of Uncle Vernie’s grandchildren saw the above photo he asked if the Millers were Amish back then. I can see why he asked that. The boy’s haircuts and clothing do bear some resemblance.

Old Miller hair clippers.

My Uncle Kenny, like all the Millers, believes that anything can be fixed and thinks that with some WD-40 he can get the scissors and clippers working again.

Seriously? Does he really want them to function again?

I can almost hear my grandfather Carl saying, “Stop crying or I’ll give you something to cry about.”

This could be the reason no one in the family went into the hair-dressing profession.

Dec 31

Happy New Year!

Happy New Year from Karen’s Chatt! Wishing all a happy, healthy, and prosperous 2020.

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