Jun 24

Willshire Days Parade

Everyone loves a parade.

This weekend Willshire, Ohio, celebrates its annual Willshire Days festival. The weekend (Friday-Sunday) will be filled with all sorts of activities for everyone. This week’s Photo Star has over two pages devoted to the festival activities, their sponsors, and local businesses.

Personally, I am interested in the garage sales and perusing several of my favorite home decorating and antique shops. The stores are right in downtown Willshire and are worth a drive and a look-see any time of year!

One of the highlights of Willshire Days is their parade on Saturday afternoon, starting at 4:00.

A few weeks ago I ran across these old photos taken by my mom and dad. I could tell the photos were of a parade in Willshire but the year was not written on them. They look like they were from the late-60s or the 70s and I am guessing the parade may have been Willshire’s Sesquicentennial Parade in 1972 . Perhaps one of my readers can confirm that.

Whatever the occasion, it looks like Willshire had quite a nice parade that year.

Willshire Parade, Unknown date.

Willshire Parade, unknown date.

Willshire Parade, Unknown date.

Willshire Parade, unknown date.

Willshire Parade, Unknown date.

Willshire Parade, unknown date.

Willshire Parade, Unknown date.

Willshire Parade, unknown date.

Willshire Parade, Unknown date.

Willshire Parade, unknown date.

Willshire Parade, Unknown date.

Willshire Parade, unknown date.

Of course neighboring Chattanooga was  represented in the parade.

Chattanooga, Ohio, Fire Truck, Willshire Parade, Unknown date.

Chattanooga, Ohio, Fire Truck, Willshire Parade, unknown date.

Willshire Parade, Unknown date.

Willshire Parade, unknown date.

Willshire Parade, Unknown date.

Willshire Parade, unknown date.

Willshire Parade, Unknown date.

Willshire Parade, unknown date.

Willshire Parade, Unknown date.

Willshire Parade, unknown date.

In later years my dad often drove his Jeep in the Willshire Days Parade. I will write about that another time.

I encourage you to visit Willshire this weekend and join in on the festivities.

 

 

Jun 21

Tombstone Tuesday–Edna E. (Grauberger) Clase

Edna E. (Grauberger) Clase, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

Edna E. (Grauberger) Clase, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Edna E. (Grauberger) Clase, located in row 6 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

Edna E. Clase
Oct. 18 1913
Sep. 11, 1988

Edna Elizabeth Grauberger was born in Blackcreek Township, Mercer County, Ohio, on 18 October 1913, the third daughter of M. Henry and Emma (Baker) Grauberger.

Edma  was baptized at Zion Chatt by Rev. Reitz on 17 December 1913. Her aunt Elizabeth (Grauberger) Strabel was her baptismal sponsor. Edna was confirmed at Zion Chatt by Rev. J.E. Albrecht on Palm Sunday, 10 April 1927.

Edna Grauberger married Robert L. Clase on 13 March 1936 in Huntington, Indiana. Robert was a trucker who lived in Decatur, Indiana.  Robert was born 22 July 1912 in Pierceton, Indiana, the son of Samuel Harrison and Elizabeth “Lizzie” (Deitsch) Clase. His father Samuel Clase lived in Willshire in 1936 and his mother Lizzie (Deitsch) was from Chatt, the daughter of Jacob and Gertrude (Miller) Deitsch. [1]

In 1940 Robert, Edna, and their one-year old son Robert Allen lived in a rented home in Chatt. No occupation was given for Robert. Some of their neighbors included Lewis Wendel, Fred Wick, Christian Bollenbacher, Ivan Johnson, and Luther and John Fisher. [2]

By 1945 Robert and Edna had moved to Hamilton, Ohio, where Robert worked as a bartender and Edna as the restaurant manager at Garnett Hoskins. [3] They remained in Hamilton for at least another two years and lived at 518 Long Street in 1947, when Robert was employed as a trucker and Edna was a compiler at Las-Stick Manufacturing Company. [4]

Not long after that Robert and Edna divorced and Edna and her young son Robert Allen moved back to Chatt, where they lived in a brick duplex home across from the Chatt Bar, just north of Wendel’s Garage. Edna worked two jobs to support them– sanding wood at the Mersman Table Factory in Celina and tending bar at the Chatt Bar. Her family remembers her as a woman of incredible strength–a single, working mother, at a time and place where neither was common.

Later in her life Edna moved to New Carlisle, Indiana, where she died from complications of a duodenal ulcer on 11 September 1988. She died at the Hamilton Grove nursing home and was 74 years old. On her death certificate her occupation was given as an inspector at a furniture company. Her son, Robert Allen, of Edwardsburg, Michigan, was the informant for the information on her death certificate. Edna was buried on 14 September. [5]

Robert L and Edna (Grauberger) Clase had one son:
Robert Allen (1938-2008), married Nancy Elson

 

[1] “Indiana Marriages, 1811-2007,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 17 June 2016), Robert L Clase and Edna E Grauberger, 13 Mar 1936; from Huntington, Indiana, Marriages, Vol. 30, 1935-37, p. 49; from FHL microfilm 2295254.

[2] 1940 U.S. Census, Liberty, Mercer, Ohio, ED 54-22, p.14A, line 16, Robert Clase; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 19 Jun 2016); from NARA microfilm T627, roll 3114.

[3] Hamilton, Ohio, City Directory, 1945, p.137; database on-line, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 19 Jun 2016); from U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995.

[4] Hamilton, Ohio, City Directory, 1947, p.148; database on-line, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 19 Jun 2016); from U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995.

[5] Indiana, Death Certificates, 1899-2011, database on-line, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 19 Jun 2016); from Indiana State Board of Health Death Certificates, Indiana Archives and Records Administration, Indianapolis.

Jun 17

Painting

Painting. Not my favorite thing to do, but I can do it. No, not fancy painting. Not portraits, landscapes, still life, faux wall painting, or the popular chippy distressed furniture painting. Just basic painting.

This was my latest project just this past Wednesday. Something I have been wanting to do for some time.

Dry sink needing a make-over.

Dry sink needing a make-over.

We constructed this dry sink from a kit about 40 years ago. So is it considered “vintage” now? Maybe. Over four decades ago I painted the dry sink orange, antiqued it, and applied the decals. And there it has set, looking dreadful, until Wednesday. We were tired of the color and those outdated decals. I had wanted to try chalk paint for some time and this piece was going to be my beginner’s refurb paint project. After all, there wasn’t much else I could do to harm the appearance of this piece of furniture.

I used Miss Lillian’s NO-Wax Chock Paint in French Country. They told me at the store that this paint is very easy to apply and to be sure to use an old brush of poor quality. That didn’t sound too bad. I could do that. The label on the bottle described the paint as “Delicately textured & chock full of colorful goodness. No stripping, sanding, or waxing required!” Pretty simple, although I did do a little sanding before I applied the paint. The paint was thick but I still needed to apply two coats to cover the orange.

Dry sink after painting with

Dry sink after painting with Miss Lillian’s French Country No-Wax Chock Paint.

I think the dry sink turned out good although it is a little more pristine than I really wanted. Maybe it was that second coat of paint. Eventually I may sand some of the edges to give it a used/worn look. At least it has a new fresh look in a much softer color. The finish is softer, too, not shiny like the previous old polyurethane finish.

My grandma Schumm also liked painted furniture and she painted her share of tables and chairs over the years.

My mom did not care for painted furniture, probably because she grew up with it. Or, as someone once suggested, rich-looking, natural wood furniture was owned by the more well-to-do families while the families of modest means had painted furniture. I don’t know if that is true of not, but for whatever reason, when my mom acquired Grandma’s painted furniture she stripped all the paint off and brought them back to their natural wood finish.

My mom very much liked to refinish furniture. She actually refinished many pieces for me over the years. I would pick up old items at auction and she would make them look beautifully “new” again. She had a lot of patience for that and didn’t mind scraping off all that old varnish, sanding the wood, restaining it, and then putting a final finish back on.

Grandma had a nice drop-leaf table that she had painted green. I remember my mom telling me what a job it was to remove all that green paint, especially on the turned legs. It really is a beautiful wood table now.

Grandma's drop-leaf table refinished by my mom.

Grandma’s drop-leaf table refinished by my mom.

Grandma’s favorite paint color had to be green. It was the color she used most often although she did have some black chairs. She used several shades of green paint and I have two of her green benches.

One of Grandma's old painted benches.

One of Grandma’s old painted benches. Note the chippy paint!

I also have three of Grandma’s four old green table chairs. My mom tried to remove the green enamel paint from the fourth chair but that paint stripping process did not go well for her. The fourth chair, with its half-removed blistered paint, remains in a shed. The three chairs I have look good and I do not find the green paint objectionable at all.

One of Grandma Schumm's green chairs.

One of Grandma Schumm’s green chairs.

I guess I am a mixture of both my Mom and my Grandma. I like the beauty of wood but I also really like the look of painted furniture, especially pieces that have old chippy-paint. I will not paint over a piece of furniture with nice looking wood, but on the other hand, I will not strip the paint off a painted piece. I actually seek out painted pieces.

Or maybe I am just lazy! Either way saves me a lot of work!

For my next painting project I will be painting some walls.

Jun 14

Tombstone Tuesday–M. Henry & Emma (Baker) Grauberger

Henry & Emma (Baker) Grauberger, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

Henry & Emma (Baker) Grauberger, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Michael Henry and Emma (Baker) Grauberger, located in row 1 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

M. Henry
1871-1918
Emma M.
1878-1967
GRAUBERGER
Gone But Not Forgotten

Michael Heinrich “Henry” Grauberger was born in Blackcreek Township, Mercer County, Ohio, on 24 February 1871 according to his Mercer County birth record. [1] His baptismal and confirmation records at Zion Chatt indicates he was born 24 February 1872.

Henry was the son of George A. & Anna M. (Schaefer) Grauberger and he was baptized at Zion Chatt on 21 November 1872, with Johannes Ganter and wife serving as his sponsors. Henry was confirmed at Zion Chatt on Palm Sunday, 30 March 1890.

Henry’s father George was born in the Kingdom of Bavaria and his mother was born in Hessen Darmstadt. His father George served as a private in Co C, 122 Regiment, Ohio Infantry, during the Civil War. [2] [3]

Henry’s parents lived in Franklin County, Ohio, before moving to Blackcreek Township in Mercer County, Ohio, in about 1868.

The first census Henry appeared in was the 1880 census. In the Grauberger household in 1880: George, 55; Anna M, 45; John A, 20; Elizabeth, 16; George, 11; Henry M, 9. All of the children were born in Ohio. [4]

According to Zion Chatt’s records Henry Grauberger married Emma Baker on 8 March 1900. Emma was born in Indiana, the daughter of William and Philippina/Phebe (Gehm) Baker. Emma’s father was born in Ohio and her mother was born in Germany.

Henry and Emma lived with Henry’s parents after they were first married. The George Grauberger household in 1900: George [Sr], Anna, John A, George, Henry, and Henry’s wife Emma (Baker) Grauberger. According to the census enumeration Henry and Emma were married less than a year and had no children. George Sr farmed and his sons worked on the farm. [5]

Henry Grauberger died of influenza and pneumonia on 11 December 1918, at the age of 48 years, 9 months, and 14 days. He was buried on the 13th. Zion Chatt’s records indicate he was survived by his widow, children, mother, brothers, and sisters.

In 1920 widow Emma Graubarger lived with her four daughters in Blackcreek Township. She was enumerated as Mrs. Henry Grauberger, age 41, widowed. Also in the household were daughters Ana, 19; Laura, 15; Lavina, 8; and Edna, 6. All of the daughters were born in Ohio. [6]

In 1930 Emma lived with three of her daughters, and her brother Jacob C. Baker in Blackcreek Township. In the household: Emma, 51; Laura M, 25; Lavina E, 18; Edna E, 16; and Jacob C, 45. Her oldest daughter Anna was married to John Reichard by this time. Emma Grauberger lived very close to where I grew up, the house west of where Johnny and Clara Reef lived, about ½ west of 49 on 707. [7]

In 1940 Emma, age 61, lived by herself in the same house, near neighbors that I remember, Johnny and Clara Reef, Homer and Leona Carr, and Forrest and Helen Ripley. [8] My mom said that Emma came to the house to visit and see me when was a baby.

Emma’s daughter Anna, who had married John Reichard, died at the age 41. After Anna’s death Emma’s grandson Gene Reichard went to live with Emma.

Emma (Baker) Grauberger died 5 February 1967, at the age of 88 years. [9] She was buried on the 8th.

Henry and Emma Grauberger had the following children:
Anna (1901-1942), married John E. Reichard
Esther Lavina (1911-1988), married Guy Hoyt Krall
Edna E. (1913-1988), married Robert Clase
Laura Margaret (1904-1977), married John Henry Sipe

 

[1] “Ohio, County Births, 1841-2003,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 11 Jun 2016), Henry Groubarger, 24 Feb 1871; from Mercer County Births, Vol. 1, p.58; from FHL microfilm 914953.

[2] 1890 U.S. Veterans Schedule, Blackcreek, Mercer, Ohio, ED 178, p. 2, line 3, Georges Grougbarger; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 22 May 2016); Records of the Department of Veterans Affairs, from NARA microfilm M123, Record Group 15.

[3] “United States General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 22 May 2016), George Grauberger, 1888.

[4] 1880 U.S. Census, Black Creek, Mercer, Ohio, ED 179, p.327A, line 30, George Granberger; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 21 May 2016); from NARA microfilm T9, roll 1048.

[5] 1900 U.S. Census, Blackcreek, Mercer, Ohio, ED 74, p. 8A, dwelling 167, family 167, George A Grauberger; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 21 May 2016); from FHL microfilm 1241303, from NARA microfilm T623, roll 1303.

[6] 1920 U.S. Census, Black Creek, Mercer, Ohio, ED 124, p.12A, dwelling 228, Mrs. Henry Grombarger; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 Jun 2016); from NARA microfilm T625, roll 1418.

[7] 1930 U.S. Census, Black Creek, Mercer, Ohio, ED 1, p.6A, dwelling & family 131, Emma Grauberger; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 Jun 2016); from FHL microfilm 2341584, from NARA microfilm T626, roll 1850.

[8] 1940 U.S. Census, Black Creek, Mercer, Ohio, Ed 54-1, p.8B, visited 173, line 67, Emma Grangerger; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 Jun 2016); from NARA microfilm T627, roll 3114. [Note: this surname is indexed as Grangerger on Ancestry.com in the 1940 census.]

[9] Ohio Department of Health, Index to Annual Deaths, 1958-2002; State Vital Statistics Unit, Columbus, OH; (www.ancestry.com  : accessed 10 Jun 2016); from certificate 120, vol. 2.

Jun 10

Attica–The TV Movie

Some of you may remember or have heard of the 1971 prison riot at the Attica Correctional Facility in Attica, New York. Initiated by prisoners’ demands for political rights and better living conditions, about 2200 inmates took control of the prison and held 42 individuals hostage for four days. In the end at least 43 people were dead, including ten correctional officers and civilian employees, and 33 inmates.

So why the interest in the 1971 Attica prison riot?

Late in 1979 ABC filmed a TV movie about the Attica Prison Riot. The movie, entitled Attica, was filmed at the Lima State Hospital, in Lima, Ohio, where my dad was employed as a security guard at the time. He worked at the Lima State Hospital for the Criminally Insane for 23 years, from 1959-1983. When they filmed the TV movie Attica my dad was there, right in the thick of things. He was even able to get Joe and me a pass into the prison one evening to watch some of the filming. We got to see Charles Durning and a couple other actors film a scene.

Herb Miller at Lima State Hospital, 1968.

Herb Miller at Lima State Hospital, 1968.

He said they chose the Lima facility because it had an enclosed courtyard like the courtyard at the Attica prison.

Courtyard at Lima State Hospital during the filming of Attica, 1979.

Courtyard at Lima State Hospital during the filming of Attica, 1979.

While going through some old papers recently I came across some photos and other items that my dad saved from the filming of the movie Attica.

Attica starred Charles Durning, Henry Darrow, George Grizzard, Joel Fabiani, and Morgan Freeman, to name a few.  I am able to identify Charles Durning, Henry Darrow, and George Grizzard in the photos my dad had.

Actor Charles Durning during filming of Attica, 1979, Lima, Ohio.

Actor Charles Durning during filming of Attica, 1979, Lima, Ohio.

 

Actor Henry Darrow, filming of Attica, Lima, Ohio, 1979.

Actor Henry Darrow, Attica, Lima, Ohio, 1979.

Actor George Grizzard, Attica, Lima, Ohio, 1979.

Actor George Grizzard, Attica, Lima, Ohio, 1979.

ABC hired a lot of local men from the area as extras and I knew at least one man from St. Marys who was hired as an extra.

In addition to the photos, my dad saved some other interesting items from the filming. I found copies of two checks written to my dad. I doubt that he was in the movie, but I suspect he did some extra security duty from 1-3 November 1979.

Check from Attica Production Account, Nov 1979.

Check from Attica Production Account, Nov 1979.

Check from Attica Production Account, Nov 1979.

Check from Attica Production Account, Nov 1979.

He also saved the Call Sheet for Saturday, 3 November.

Attica Call Sheet, 3 Nov 1979.

Attica Call Sheet, 3 Nov 1979.

He had a copy of the movie script. I watched the beginning of the movie on YouTube and it is definitely the script.

Attica script, ABC TV movie, 1979.

Attica script, ABC TV movie, 1979.

Inside the cover of the script is the following introduction. A map of Attica Prison is on the following page.

This is the story of the most violent prison revolt in the history of this country. It took place at Attica State Prison in upstate New York during four days in September of 1971.

Blue Ribbon Commissions have studied Attica, and many of the participants on both sides have written about it. One of those was Tom Wicker, then an associate editor of the New York Times, who was one of a group of observers invited to the prison by the rebelling inmates to monitor the negotiations.

This is the story of Attica as seen by Tom Wicker.

First page of Attica script, 1979.

First page of Attica script, 1979.

The following letter to my dad, dated 14 November 1979, was from the Superintendent of the Lima State Hospital:

To: Herb Miller, Security
From: Ronald E. Hubbard, Superintendent
Subject: Letter of Commendation

Please allow me to take this opportunity to thank you individually for your outstanding work and cooperation during the filming of the ABC movie “Attica.” Please be assured that during the long days and nights, your work did not go unnoticed.

Your extreme loyalty, dedication and hard work made this difficult task an easy one. The ABC film executives were astounded and could not believe that such an undertaking could be accomplished.

I wish to take this opportunity to make you feel assured that this job could not have been done without your help. I appreciate your participation and your hard work.

Thank you very much for an extremely hard job done extremely well.

REH: gem
Cc: Personnel File

It was probably quite an undertaking and risk to film a movie at a prison where inmates were incarcerated at the same time.

The TV Movie Attica aired in March 1980 and was an hour and 37 minutes long. It won a Primetime Emmy for Outstanding Directing in a Limited Series or a Special. The movie actually had five Emmy nominations: Outstanding Film Editing for a Limited Series or a Special; Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or a Special (Charles Durning); Outstanding Writing in a Limited Series or a Special; Outstanding Achievement in Film Sound Editing; and Outstanding Directing in a Limited Series or a Special.

The movie was written by James S. Henerson and Tom Wicker, who wrote the book. It was directed by Marvin J. Chomsky.

I remember my dad telling me that one of the actors really liked his Chatt Bar jacket and so my dad gave it to him. I wonder what ever happened to that jacket. Is floating around somewhere in Hollywood today?

 

Sources:

“Attica Prison Riot,” Wikipedia.com

IMDb.com   

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