Jun 10

Tombstone Tuesday–Marie Bausser

Marie Bausser, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Mercer County, Ohio. (2012 photo by Karen)

Marie Bausser, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Mercer County, Ohio. (2012 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Marie Bausser, located in row 1 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

MARIE BAUSSER
1887-1905

Marie Catharina Bausser was born 29 September of 1887 in Ohio, the daughter of John and Pauline (Grabner/Grapner) Basser.

According to the records of St. Paul Lutheran, Liberty Township, Marie Catharina Bausser was baptized by Rev. Oelkers on 16 October 1887. Her baptismal sponsors were Adam Fender, Heinrich Grabner and Maria Grabner. Marie was confirmed at St. Paul on 3 June 1900.

Sometimes the church records do not seem to give all the information I would like. At least not at first glance. When all the information is not in one particular event entry the other bits of information become very important clues.

Three Baussers are buried at Zion’s cemetery: Marie (1887-1905), Pauline (1856-1929), and John (1847-1898). However, Marie and John’s burials were not recorded in Zion’s records. Pauline’s death and burial was recorded by the minister, but not under the Bausser surname.

The Baussers attended church at St. Paul Liberty Township and Zion Chatt for a period of time and were mentioned a couple times in their church records. Two Bausser children were confirmed at Zion Chatt—Johann Edward in 1893 and Margaretha in 1896. Those records indicate that John was their father. In addition, John Edward Bausser was a baptismal sponsor for Edward Paul Strebel [sic] in 1896 and for Luther Edward Clase in 1899.

John Bausser’s tombstone indicates that he was the husband of Polly, so Pauline Bausser was very likely his wife. John died in 1898 and according to Zion’s records Pauline Bowser married Wilhelm Andres on 27 August 1899. The information fits. A widow with several children remarries.

Armed with that information I located William and “Caroline” Andrews in the 1900 census, living in Liberty Township. Apparently Pauline was called Caroline then, because living in this household, in addition to four Andrews children, were four Bausser children: Edward, 20; Maggie, 16; Mary 14; and Willie, 9. The Bausser children were listed as step-children.

According to the 1900 census, wife and mother Caroline, aka Pauline, had given birth to four children and all four were living. Mary Bausser was age 14 and was born September 1886 in Ohio. Caroline was born December 1854 in Ohio. [1]

 

[1] 1900 U.S. Census, Liberty, Mercer County, Ohio, ED 85, dwelling 290, house 196, p. 15B, William Andrews; digital images by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 8 June 2014), from FHL microfilm 1241304, from NARA microfilm T623, roll 1304.

Jun 06

Co. E, 89th Indiana Voluntary Infantry Roster

Last week I told about Hallot Bryan’s Civil War service. He served in Company E of the 89th Indiana Volunteer Infantry and died of dysentery on 13 September 1863 in Memphis, Tennessee. Hallot is buried in Memphis National Cemetery.

89th Indiana Infantry Roster.

89th Indiana Infantry Roster.

Company E of the 89th Indiana Infantry was organized at Indianapolis and mustered in 28 August 1862. Most volunteers in Company E were from Jay County, Indiana. Below is the roster of the enlisted men and recruits of Company E, their residence, and some additional information about some of the soldiers.

89th Indiana Infantry Roster.

89th Indiana Infantry Roster.

White, Frederick W; Lancaster, First Sergeant
Hall, Joseph L; New Corydon, Sergeant
Eblin, Joseph; Salamonie, Sergeant
Wright, Aaron W; Salamonie, Sergeant
Jackson, John W; Jay C. H, Sergeant
Peterson, William S; Jay C. H, Corporal (Died 6 February 1865)
Loy, Adam; Salamonie, Corporal (Died at St. Louis, Mo., 6 October 1864)
Stratton, Stephen A; N. Mt. Pleasant, Corporal (Died at Fort Pickering, Tenn., 10 Aug 1863)
Myers, William D; N. Mt Pleasant, Corporal
O’Harra, Charles T; New Corydon, Corporal
Arbaugh, Perry; Westchester, Corporal
Adams, David W; Westchester, Corporal
Broughman, Elijah; College Corners, Corporal

Cloud, Jonathan; Hector, Musician
Ogden, John; Bear Creek, Musician
Way, Philo P; New Corydon, Wagoner

Privates:
Arnold, David S; Westchester
Armentrout, Daniel; New Corydon
Armentrout, John; New Corydon
Athy, John C; N. Mt. Pleasant (Killed at Yellow Bayou, 18 May 1864)
Arbaugh, George W; Westchester
Adams, William T; Westchester
Boyles, David; Hector (Died at St. Louis, Mo., 18 March 1863)
Broughman, Daniel; College Corner (Died at Memphis, Tenn., 8 December 1862)
Brewington, George M; Hector
Beard, John C; Salamonie
Bryan, Hallot; Westchester (Died at Memphis, Tenn., 13 September 1863)
Bartmas; Abraham, New Corydon
Beason, George W; N. Mt. Pleasant (Killed at Pleasant Hill, La., 9 Apr 1864)
Bonecutter, John; N. Mt. Pleasant
Blackburn, Joseph; N. Mt. Pleasant
Barr, Stephen; N. Mt. Pleasant
Buckingham, Elias; New Corydon
Bergman, Absalom; Hector
Castle, Tomas; Jay
Clawson, Josiah; Jay
Clawson, Garrett; Jay
Corwin, Cornelius; N. Mt. Pleasant
Cook, Peter, M; N. Mt. Pleasant
Conkel, John A; Jay
Delph, Fountain; N. Mt. Pleasant
Evilsizer, Minor; Jay
Evilsizer, Lafayette; Jay (Died at Fort Pickering, Tenn., 23 May 1863)
Elliott, Jesse; N. Mt. Pleasant
Fifer, Benjamin; Westchester
Glasford, George W; Hector
Gilbert, William; Jay
Gray, Joseph; Linnville (Killed at Yellow Bayou, 18 May 1864)
Houser, Lewis; New Corydon
Haffner, William R; Bear Creek
Hudson, Benjamin J; N. Mt. Pleasant (Died at Memphis, Tenn., 3 August 1863)
Henry, George; N. Mt. Pleasant (Died 12 April 1864; wounds; in hands of enemy.)
Hilton, John W; N. Mt Pleasant (Never mustered into the service)
Henry, William; N. Mt. Pleasant
Hanlin, John G; Hector
Isenhart, Silas; College Corner (Died 7 July 1863)
Jetter, John D; Jay
Jackson, Joseph; Salamonie
Jones, Samuel W; New corydon
James, Jesse; N. Mt. Pleasant ( Died 22 May 1863)
Kelley, Francis M; Westchester
Loofborrow, Jasper N; New Corydon
Landers, Henry; New Corydon
Lewis, Chester; New Corydon
Loper, Christopher; N. Mt. Pleasant

Enlisted Men of Co. E, 89th Indiana Infantry

Enlisted Men of Co. E, 89th Indiana Infantry

McFarland, Robert W; N. Mt. Pleasant (Died 20 July 1865)
Mason, William H; Hector
Morehouse, Charles A; Hector
Morrical, Mahlon; N. Mt. Pleasant
Morrical, Adam; N. Mt. Pleasant
Meck, George W; N. Mt. Pleasant (Killed at Bayou Lamour, 7 May 1864)
McKibben, William; N. Mt. Pleasant (Never mustered into the service)
McLaughlin, William; N. Mt. Pleasant (Never mustered into the service)
Moore, James M; New Corydon (Never mustered into the service)
Miller, Ebenezer; New Corydon
Nidey, Timothy; N. Mt. Pleasant
Poling, Daniel; Bear Creek
Powers, Henry C; N. Mt. Pleasant
Premer, Samuel; Westchester
Ross, John G; Jay
Rantz, Isaac; Salamonie
Roshong, Daniel; Westchester
Sanders, William K; Bear Creek
Shane, William; New Corydon
Scott, Louton; N. Mt. Pleasant
Swyhart, George W; N. Mt. Pleasant
Snider, Franklin; New Corydon
Skinner, William; New Corydon (Never mustered into the service)
Sager, Levi; Westchester
Sigler, William; Hector (Killed at Yellow Bayou, 18 May 1864)
Tinkle, Jeremiah, F; N. Mt Pleasant
Walter, Washington; New Corydon
Warnock, Francis; Salamonie (Killed in skirmish, Fort Blakely, 5 April 1865)
Wible, William; Jay C. H
Wible, Robert; Jay C. H
Wible, Jacob; Jay C. H
Williams, Joseph; Jay C. H
Young, Robert; New Corydon (Died 5 Mar 1863)

Recruits:
Bergman, Hawey (Transferred to 26th Reg. 19 June 1865)
Kelly, William S.
Loofbanoro [sic], Elias
Money, Jacob
Miller, John Y (Transferred to 26th Reg. 19 June 1865)
Metzner, William T. (Transferred to 26th Reg. 19 June 1865)
Montgomery, George G. (Transferred to 26th Reg. 19 June 1865)
Meed, Nathaniel (Transferred to 26th Reg. 19 June 1865)
Premer, Isaac (Transferred to 26th Reg. 19 June 1865)
Siberry, William R. (Transferred to 26th Reg. 19 June 1865)
Siberry, Thomas J. (Transferred to 26th Reg. 19 June 1865)
Stanley, James B. (Transferred to 26th Reg. 19 June 1865)
Stratton, Timothy L.
Teeters, Jacob
Wilson, Judson C. (Transferred to 26th Reg. 19 June 1865) [1]

The 89th Regiment lost 6 officers and 55 enlisted men who were killed and mortally wounded and 3 officers and 188 enlisted men to disease, for a total of 252 fatalities. [2]

 

[1] Company E Roster, 89th Indiana Infantry, digital images at Internet Archive (https://archive.org/details/reportindiana06dougrich : accessed 4 June 2014), from Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Indiana, Vol. 6, 1861-1865, W.H.H. Terrell, Adjutant General, Indiana, 1866.

[2] The Civil War Archive, Union Regimental Histories, Indiana, http://www.civilwararchive.com/Unreghst/unininf7.htm#89th, accessed 4 June 2014.

 

Jun 03

Tombstone Tuesday–Fred & Mary Ruck

Fred & Mary Ruck, Zion Cemetery, Logan County, Oklahoma. (submitted photo)

Fred & Mary Ruck, Zion Cemetery, Logan County, Oklahoma. (photo courtesy of Joyce Layman)

This is the tombstone of Fred and Mary Ruck, located in Zion Cemetery, Orlando, Logan County, Oklahoma. The marker is inscribed:

MARY
Nov. 4, 1861
Feb. 23, 1956

FRED
Aug. 5, 1860
Apr. 10, 1924

RUCK

Johann Fredrick Rueck was the fourth of twelve children born to Jacob and Maria Regina (Gross) Rueck, born in Steinbach, Oberamt Crailsheim, Württemberg, on 5 August 1860.

Fred immigrated to America with his family in about 1880. The Ruecks lived near Schumm, in Van Wert County, Ohio, for a couple of years. Most of the family then moved to Oregon, except Fred and his sister Christena. Christena married Jacob Miller and they resided in Mercer County. They were my great-grandparents. Christena’s brother Fred was my great-granduncle.

Fred left Van Wert County and went to Chicago, where he worked as a butcher for a short time. In 1884 he traveled westward to Kansas and changed the spelling of his surname from Rueck to Ruck.

While in Kansas he met and married Mary Prollock.

Fred & Mary (Prollock) Ruck, 1905. (photo courtesy of Joyce Layman)

Fred & Mary (Prollock) Ruck, 1905. (photo courtesy of Joyce Layman)

Mary was born to Michael and Eva Prollock on 4 November 1861 in Germany. She immigrated with her family in 1883 and they settled in Clay Center, Kansas. A year later, in 1884, she and Fred married. Fred and Mary lived in Kansas about six years before moving to Orlando, Oklahoma, in about 1890.

Fred homesteaded 160 acres of land in the Oklahoma Territory, located in the southeast quarter of Section 9, Township 19 North of Range two West of the Indian Meridian in the Oklahoma Territory. His homestead certificate is dated 26 December 1896.

Fred Ruck Homestead Cert. No. 2384, Oklahoma Territory, 1896. (courtesy of Joyce Layman)

Fred Ruck Homestead Cert. No. 2384, Oklahoma Territory, 1896. (photo courtesy of Joyce Layman)

They lived the rest of their lives on their Oklahoma farm.

Fred Ruck Sr. farm, Logan Co., Oklahoma. (photo courtesy of Joyce Layman)

Fred Ruck Sr. farm, Logan Co., Oklahoma. (photo courtesy of Joyce Layman)

Fred Ruck was known as the local veterinarian in the Orlando area and was elected Logan County road-overseer during 1892, 1896, 1898, 1900, and as trustee in 1912, 1914, and 1916.

Fred Ruck died at his home near Orlando at 3 p.m. 10 April 1924 at the age of 63 years, 8 months and 5 days.

Mary was a charter member of the Zion Evangelical Church west of Orlando and attended services in the Dierolf home before the church was erected. She was the oldest member of the Evangelical United Brethren Church in Orlando, which later became the Methodist Church.

Mary died at the home of her daughter Lena Frey on 23 February 1956. Mary had been bed-fast for twelve days before her death. [1]

Fred Ruck Sr Children: Fred Jr, Frank, Lena, Katie. (photo courtesy of Joyce Layman)

Fred Ruck Sr Children (c1900): Fred Jr, Frank, Lena, Katie. (photo courtesy of Joyce Layman)

Obituary:
Died at home at 3 P.M.
Fred Ruck, born at Steinbach Wuertemberg, Germany, August 5, 1860, died at his home near Orlando, Oklahoma, at 3p.m. April 10th 1924, aged 63 years, 8 months and 5 days.

He came to America with his parents in 1880 and settled in Ohio. He moved to Kansas in 1884 and was united in marriage to Mary Prollock the same year. To this union was born seven children, two of these preceding him in death.

In 1891 the family moved to Oklahoma and settled on a farm near Orlando, where he made his home until he departed this life.

Mr. Ruck was converted under the labors of Bro. Nannings and remained a true believer in Jesus Christ throughout his life. He was always ready and willing to give a helping hand at all times.

He leaves to mourn his departure a wife and five children, namely, Mrs. Katie Wait of Sawyer, Frank Ruck of El Dorado, Kansas, Mrs. Lena Frey, Fred and Marie Ruck of Orlando, also 11 grandchildren, four brothers and three sisters and a host of relatives and friends. He endured his suffering patiently until the death angel called to his eternal reward.

Mr. Ruck will be greatly missed by his many friends, having lived in this community for 33 years. He was a loving husband, father and friend. [2]

Fred Sr with granddaughter Mildred. (photo courtesy of Joyce Layman)

Fred Sr with granddaughter Mildred. (photo courtesy of Joyce Layman)

Obituary:
Rites Slated Sunday For Mrs. Mary Ruck
Rites for Mrs. Mary Ruck, 94, pioneer of the Orlando community, will be held at 2 p.m., Sunday in the
United Evangelical Church at Orlando. Rev. E.A. Pauli will officiate and burial will be in Zion cemetery, west of Orlando. Smith funeral home is in charge of the arrangements.

Mrs. Ruck died Thursday morning at the home of her daughter Mrs. Lena Frey in Mulhall. In addition to Mrs. Frey, she is survived by two sons, Frank Ruck of Eldorado, Kan., and Fred Ruck of Orlando; and one other Daughter Mrs. Marie Scott of Orlando, 17 grandchildren, 40 great grandchildren, and two great great grandchildren.

Fred & Mary (Prollock) Ruck with Frank & Katie, c1889.  (Karen's photo collection)

Fred & Mary (Prollock) Ruck, with Frank & Katie. (Karen’s photo collection)

Fred and Mary (Prollock) Ruck had 7 children:
“Frank” Fred (1886-1965) married Lena Woelhof
Katie Regina (1888-1947) married Arthur Pierce Wait
Lena Ester (1890-1975) married Samuel G. Frey
John “Fred Jr” (1894-1977) married Gladys Izola Brown
Marie (1903-1982) married Jesse “Emmett” Scott
A son and a daughter died in infancy.

The 1900 US census indicates that Katie and Frank Ruck were born in Kansas, Katie in 1884 [sic] and Frank in 1886. Children Lena and Fred Jr were born in Oklahoma, Lena in 1889 and Fred Jr in 1893. The census also indicates that Fred and Mary had been married 16 years. [3]

Fred Ruck Sr family, seated: Mary, Marie, Fred Sr; standing: Katie, Fred Jr, Frank, Lena. (photo courtesy of Joyce Layman)

Fred Ruck Sr family, c1911, seated: Mary (Prollock), Marie, Fred Sr; standing: Katie, Fred Jr, Frank, Lena. (photo courtesy of Joyce Layman)

Thank you to Fred’s great-granddaughter Joyce for supplying the photos and most of the information about Fred and his family.

 

[1] From notes taken at Mary (Prollock) Ruck’s funeral, 27 February 1956, notes taken by E. A. Pauli for Mary’s daughter Marie (Ruck) Scott, who was deaf.

[2] Orlando Clipper, Orlando Oklahoma, 18 April 1924.

[3] 1900 U.S. Census, Orlando, Logan County, Oklahoma, ED 144, p. 6B, dwelling 114, family 116, Fred Ruck; digital images by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 2 June 2014), from FHL microfilm 1241339, from NARA microfilm T623, roll 1339.

May 30

Private Hallot Bryan in the Civil War

Hallot Bryan, son of Peter and Mary (Huey) Bryan, was born about 1836 in Fairfield County, Ohio. After moving several times the family settled down in Jay County, Indiana, where Hallot maintained the family farm after his father passed away in 1854. Hallot was the brother of my great-great-great-grandfather John Bryan, the paternal side of my family.

The Civil War began in 1861 and Hallot enlisted about 16 months later, on 13 August 1862. He was a private in Company E of the 89th Indiana Infantry Regiment, which consisted of many men from Jay County. He enlisted at Portland for a term of 3 years and  bounty pay of $27 and was in Captain Joseph P. Winters Company. Hallot gave his residence Westchester, Indiana, which was an unincorporated community in Bearcreek Township, located southeast of Bryant.

According to his military service record, Private Bryan was 27 years old, 5 feet 8 inches tall, with a fair complexion, dark eyes and dark hair. The record indicates he was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, and that he was a farmer. [1]

The 89th Indiana Infantry was organized at Indianapolis and Wabash and mustered in at Indianapolis on 28 August 1862. The 89th went first to Louisville and then to Munfordville, Kentucky. They were soon engaged in battle. [2]

Civil War re-enactment, Celina, Ohio. (2000 photo by Karen)

Civil War re-enactment, Celina, Ohio. (2000 photo by Karen)

The regiment was sent to Munfordville to reinforce the Federal garrison, but it became the Battle of Munfordville. The 89th Indiana Infantry, along with several other Indiana and Kentucky regiments, fought from 14-17 September 1862.

Munfordville was an important transportation center north of the Green River, in central Kentucky. It was near a Louisville & Nashville Railroad bridge that crossed the Green River. The battle resulted in a Confederate victory when the Union troops surrendered to General Braxton Bragg on 17 September. The Union troops were paroled the same day.

Civil War re-enactment, Celina, Ohio. (2000 photo by Karen)

Civil War re-enactment, Celina, Ohio. (2000 photo by Karen)

An historical roadside marker near the battle site reads: BATTLE OF MUNFORDVILLE. Union forces commanded by Col. Wilder surrendered to Mississippi regiments of Gen. Bragg’s army on September 17, 1862, following battle on the 14th. 50 killed and 307 wounded. Bragg evacuated Munfordville on 20th before Gen. Buell’s forces arrived. Confederates destroyed railroad bridge. Site of Fort Craig and monument of Col. R. A. Smith 1500 ft. west. [3] [4]

The 89th Regiment returned home for about six weeks after their parole.  [2] Private Bryan was present for muster from 31 October 1862 through August 1863. [1]

Civil War re-enactment, Celina, Ohio. (2000 photo by Karen)

Civil War re-enactment, Celina, Ohio. (2000 photo by Karen)

The 89th was on guard and picket duty at Fort Pickering, south of Memphis, from 4 December 1862-16 August 1863. [5] It was during this time that Private Hallot Bryan became ill.

Hallot became ill sometime during the summer of 1863, stricken with one of the most common and deadly afflictions during the Civil War–dysentery. Dysentery was the number one killer during the Civil War, taking the lives of more soldiers than battle wounds. Unsanitary water, other unsanitary conditions, poor diet, poor hygiene, and overcrowded living conditions were the main causes of the condition. Dysentery was more prevalent during the months of July and August.

Private Bryan died 13 September 1863 at Jefferson Hospital in Memphis. His service record indicates that he died from chronic diarrhea.

Private Hallot Bryan was buried in Section 4, Plot 315 at the Old National Cemetery at Fort Pickering. [6]

Burial Ledger, Old National Cemetery, Fort Pickering. Hallot Bryan, #3679, line 39.

Burial Ledger, Old National Cemetery, Fort Pickering. Hallot Bryan, #3679, line 39.

At some point Hallot’s remains were removed from the Old National Cemetery and he was interred at Memphis National Cemetery, in Section C, Site 2740. The card below includes information taken from the oldest burial register. It bears the Columbus Marble Works stamp, dated 27 Oct 1976, likely indicating when his current military marker was placed. [7]

Hallot Bryan Interment Card, Memphis National Cemetery.

Hallot Bryan Interment Card, Memphis National Cemetery.

Memphis National Cemetery is located on the northeast side of the city and was originally a Union burial ground called Mississippi River National Cemetery. After the Civil War, burials there included re-interments from area camps and hospitals, which included Hallot.

Memphis National Cemetery Ledger Book, Hallot Bryan, p. 64, line 29; buried in Section C, Site 2740.

Memphis National Cemetery Ledger Book, Hallot Bryan, p. 64, line 29; buried in Section C, Site 2740.

There are 36,065 interments at Memphis National Cemetery. It has the second largest number of unknown burials in a national cemetery. Memphis National Cemetery is also the burial place for the victims of the USS Sultana, which exploded on 23 April 1865. Many of the unknown burials are from the Sultana. [8]

Memphis National Cemetery. (2014 photo, submitted)

Memphis National Cemetery. (2014 photo, submitted)

The 89th Indiana Infantry Regiment started with 994 men and added 124 recruits, for a total of 1,118 men. Eventually 242 died, 24 deserted, and 8 were unaccounted for. [2]

Hallot Bryan's military marker, Memphis National Cemetery. (2014 photo, submitted)

Hallot Bryan’s military marker, Memphis National Cemetery. (2014 photo, submitted)

I have heard that someone in the family has a Civil War rifle and that they do not know who it blonged to. Perhaps it was Private hallot Bryan’s rifle. I would love to see it some day.

 

[1] Compiled Service Record, Hallot Bryan, Pvt., Co. E, 89th Indiana Infantry; Record Group 94, National Archives, Washington, DC.

[2] Civil War Index, http://www.civilwarindex.com/armyin/89th_in_infantry.html; original information from The Union Army, Vol. 3 Federal Publishing Company, 1908.

[3] The Battle of Munfordville, http://www.battleforthebridge.org/Munfordville.html

[4] Civil War Trust, http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/munfordville.html

[5] 89th Indiana Infantry Regiment, Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/89th_Indiana_Infantry_Regiment

[6] Burial Ledger, Old National Cemetery, Fort Pickering, Hallot Bryan, # 3679, line 39, no page, buried in Section 4, Plot 315; Burial Registers, Military Posts and National Cemeteries, 1862-1960, database on-line, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 May 2014); from Burial Ledgers, The National Cemetery Administration, Washington D.C. (Original records transferred to NARA: Burial Registers, compiled 1867-2006, documenting the period 1831-2006, ARC ID: 5928352; Records of the Department of Veterans Affairs, 1773–2007, Record Group 15, NARA, Washington D.C.; Department of Defense, Department of the Army, Office of the Quartermaster General (09/18/1947–08/01/1962); Burial Registers of Military Post and National Cemeteries, compiled ca. 1862–ca. 1960, ARC ID: 4478151, Series A1 627, Record Group Title: Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General, 1774-1985, Record Group No. 92, NARA, Washington D.C.

[7] Hallot Bryan, Record of Interment, DA Form 2122, dated 27 Oct 1976, U.S. National Cemetery Interment Control Forms, 1928-1962, database on-line, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 May 2014); original data from Interment Control Forms, 1928–1962; Interment Control Forms, A1 2110-B; Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General, 1774–1985, Record Group 92, National Archives at College Park, College Park, Maryland. Note: This card includes information taken from the oldest burial register. It bears the Columbus Marble Works stamp, dated 27 Oct 1976, most likely indicating when the current marker was placed.

[8] Memphis, National Cemetery, National Cemetery Administration, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, http://www.cem.va.gov/cems/nchp/memphis.asp.

Other sources of information:

U.S. Veterans Gravesites, ca.1775-2006, National Cemetery Administration, database on-line, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 May 2014); original data from Nationwide Gravesite Locator, National Cemetery Administration. Note: this contains a compilation of burial records from a variety of sources & cemeteries.

Memphis National Cemetery, Burial Ledger, c.1810-1965, p. 64, line 29, Bryan, Hallot, The National Cemetery Administration; database on-line, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 May 2014); original data from Burial Ledgers of The National Cemetery Administration, Washington, D.C. (original records transferred to NARA: Burial Registers, compiled 1867-2006, documenting the period 1831-2006. ARC ID: 5928352; Records of the Department of Veterans Affairs, 1773–2007, Record Group 15. National Archives at Washington, D.C. 2; Department of Defense. Department of the Army. Office of the Quartermaster General. (09/18/1947–08/01/1962); Burial Registers of Military Post and National Cemeteries, compiled ca. 1862–ca. 1960. ARC ID: 4478151; Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General, 1774–1985, Record Group 92; National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C. Note: This ledger indicates that Hallot Bryan was originally buried in Section 4, No. 315, the Old National Cemetery, Fort Pickering, Memphis.

U.S. Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865, National Park Service, database on-line, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 May 2014); from National Park Service, Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System,  http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/, acquired 2007.

 

 

 

 

May 27

Tombstone Tuesday–Hallot Bryan

Hallot Bryan, Memphis National Cemetery. (2014 submitted photo)

Hallot Bryan, Memphis National Cemetery. (2014 submitted photo)

This is the tombstone of Hallot Bryan, located in Section C, site 2740, Memphis National Cemetery, Memphis, Tennessee. The marker is inscribed:

HALLOT BRYAN
Co. E
89 Ind Inf
September 13, 1863

Hallot Bryan was the fifth of seven known children born to Peter and Mary (Huey) Bryan, born about 1835 in Fairfield County, Ohio. [1] One account indicates that Peter and Mary had eight children. [2]

Hallot was a younger brother of my great-great-great-grandfather John Bryan. John was the father of Emily Bryan, who married William Reid. William and Emily were the parents of my great-grandmother Pearl (Reid) Brewster.

I was already familiar with this unusual first name because Hallot’s brother John named one of his sons Hallet. Hallet [the younger, 1853-1936] was a brother to Emily (Bryan) Reid and that is why the name Hallet may sound familiar to other Bryan researchers in the family. Hallot, subject of today’s post, was an uncle to the younger Hallet. They lived near each other and probably knew each other well.

I have seen his name spelled several ways—Hallot, Hallet, and Hallat. Since it is inscribed as Hallot on his tombstone I will use that spelling for this post.

I learned of the older Hallot Bryan several years ago from his father’s estate papers. Peter Bryan died in 1854 and Hallot was listed as one of his six children and an heir: Estate of Peter Bryan Dec’d. Heirs: Mary Bryan [wife]; 6 children: John Bryan; Joseph Bryan; Byantha Curtice, wife of Leonard Curtice; Hallett Bryan; Elizabeth Bryan; Peter Bryan. [3]

Hallot Bryan, Memphis National Cemetery. (2014 submitted photo0

Hallot Bryan, reverse of tombstone, Memphis National Cemetery. (2014 submitted photo)

Hallot’s parents, Peter and Mary (Huey) Bryan, were from Pennsylvania and moved to Ohio in the early 1820s. They resided in several Ohio counties before finally settling down in Jay County, Indiana, in about 1850. These counties included Coshocton, Licking, Fairfield, Putnam, and Allen. [2]

In 1830 the Peter Bryan family was living in Licking County. [4] Within five years they moved to Fairfield County, where Hallot was born in about 1835 or 1836. [1]

The Bryans moved once again and by 1840 set up residence in Monroe Township, Putnam County, Ohio. [5] At first it appears that they moved between 1840 and 1850, but I believe they were living at the same location during those years. The county boundaries changed in 1848 and Monroe Township, once located in Putnam County, was located in Allen County when the 1850 census was taken. [6]

The 1850 census was the first census in which Hallot was enumerated by name. He was 14 years old, born in Ohio, living with his parents Peter and Mary and siblings Joseph, Elisabeth, and Peter.  [7]

The Peter Bryan family moved to Jay County, Indiana, shortly after the 1850 census was enumerated. They probably followed their son John, who married Mary Huey in Jay County in 1848 and set up housekeeping there.

Peter Bryan [Sr] purchased 80 acres of land in Jay County on 19 September 1850 from Chris Huey. [8] Most of the Bryan family moved to Indiana soon after. Peter Bryan [Sr] died there in 1854, leaving his widow Mary and six children behind.

In 1860 Hallet Bryan was living with his widowed mother Mary. Hallet was 25 year of age, born in Ohio, and was a farmer. Mary was 62 years of age and born in Pennsylvania. Also living with them was Hallot’s younger brother Peter, age 21, born in Ohio, a laborer. They lived next door to Hallot’s brother Joseph. [9]

Memphis National Cemetery. (2014 submitted photo)

Memphis National Cemetery. (2014 submitted photo)

Less than three years later the Civil War was raging and young men were signing up with other locals to fight in the war. Hallot joined Company E of the 89th Indiana Infantry Regiment. He enlisted on 13 August 1862 and marched off to war from Indianapolis on 28 August, never to return to Indiana or see his family again. [1]

I am related to Hallot several different ways due to the Bryan/Huey intermarriages. Hallot was my third great granduncle [common ancestors Peter & Mary Huey Bryan]; my first cousin five times removed [common ancestors Jonas Huey & Unknown]; and my second cousin five times removed [common ancestors James Huey & Elizabeth].

A big THANK YOU to one of my patients who took these photos for me at Memphis National Cemetery a few weeks ago while on vacation.

Coming up Friday: Private Hallot Bryan’s Civil War service.

 
[1] Compiled Service Record, Hallot Bryan, Pvt., Co. E, 89th Indiana Infantry; Record Group 94, National Archives, Washington, DC.

[2] Biographical and Historical Record of Jay and Blackford Counties, Indiana (Chicago : The Lewis Publishing Company, 1887), 899.

[3] Peter Bryan estate, loose papers, Box 8, 1854, Jay County Historical Society, 903 E. Main St, Portland, Indiana.

[4] 1830 U.S. Census, Madison, Licking County, Ohio, p. 415, line 14, Peter Bryan; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.Ancestry.com : accessed 25 May 2014), from FHL Film 0337945, from NARA Series M19, roll 134.

[5] 1840 U.S. Census, Monroe, Putnam County, Ohio, p. 338, line 2, Peter Bryan; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.Ancestry.com : accessed 25 May 2014), from FHL Film 0020174, from NARA Series M704, roll 422.

[6] There was a boundary Change in 1848. Monroe Township was transferred from Putnam County, Ohio, to Allen County, Ohio: https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Allen_County,_Ohio.

[7] 1850 U.S. Census, Monroe, Allen County, Ohio, p. 369B (stamped), p. 738 (penned), dwelling 1924, family 1924, Peter Byan; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.Ancestry.com : accessed 25 May 2014); from NARA Series M432, roll 657.

[8] Jay County Indiana Land Deeds, Book F: 476, Recorders Office, Portland, Indiana.

[9] 1860 U.S. census, Bearcreek, Jay County, Indiana, p. 75 (penned), dwelling 531, family 537, Hallet Bryan; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.Ancestry.com : accessed 25 May 2014); from FHL microfilm 803269, from NARA microfilm M653, roll 269.

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