Jan 16

1940—Willshire High School Excels in Basketball and Academics

Willshire High School was known for its successful basketball teams. They even traveled to state tournaments several times. And the students were smart, too!

The following is an article about the celebration banquet held for the members of the Willshire Bearcats basketball team who played at the state basketball tournament in Columbus, Ohio, on 15 March 1940. Unfortunately they lost that game to New Carlisle 36-32. They had advanced to the second-round of the final by beating Marysville 29-21 the day before. [1]

Willshire High School, October 1917.

Willshire High School, October 1917.

Basketball Boys Honored at Banquet—
Approximately 175 patrons, students, and townspeople attended the banquet held last Wednesday evening in the school auditorium to honor Coach Lawrence Johnson and the boys of his 1939-40 basketball squad.

Coach Burl Friddle of Fort Wayne South High School delivered the principal address of the evening. He spoke of the value of an athletic program to a boy, now and in later years.

Mr. Johnson spoke briefly and presented the individual trophies which are given to each boy who takes part in a state tournament. Those receiving trophies were Donald Dellinger, Robert Myers, LaVerne Ripley, and Eugene Duff, seniors; Glenn Miller, Kent Geisler, Donald Painter, Jack Ross and Eben Alspaugh, juniors; and Henry Schumm, sophomore. LaVerne Stetler, a senior who was unable to go to the state contest due to an injury received during the county tournament, was awarded a gold basketball by the school.

Music consisted of congregational singing led by Mr. Targett, with Mrs. William Hoffer as accompanist; a high school girls’ sextette; vocal solos by Florence Dull; and an instrumental solo by Albert Wyer.

The four cheerleaders, Ruth Kuhn, LaFern Bollenbacher, Joyce Smith and Norma Jean Carr were also guests at the banquet. Members of the girls’ basketball squad were given complimentary tickets due to the thoughtfulness of the Band Mothers’ Organization, who cooked and served the meal. Mrs. Floyd Strickler is president of the Band Mothers.
[2]

The next column of that same paper reported how well Willshire High School students performed on the County Tests. Two of my close relatives were among those mentioned—two aunts, Emiline and Helen Miller, my dad’s sisters. Emiline placed first in Latin II and Helen placed third in bookkeeping. And of course all of the Schumms mentioned are relatives, too.

Emiline (Miller) Henkle

Emiline (Miller) Henkle

Willshire Pupils Rank High in County Tests—
Eight Willshire High School students, by virtue of winning first or second places in the county by elimination tests held last Friday, will be among those who represent Van Wert county at the district Scholarship Tests at Bowling Green on Saturday, May 4.

Those who placed in the county contest were: Milton Schumm, first in chemistry; Ruth Alspaugh, first in Latin I; Emiline Miller, first in Latin II; Twyla Pifer, first in Algebra; Edith Heacock, first in Typing; Lola Schumm, second in Shorthand II; Ellen Schumm, second in English 9; and Albert Wyer, second in English II.

The way Willshire students ranked in the various tests follows.

World History: Harriet Detter, third; Donna Mae Stetler, ninth.
American History: Lois King, third; Eileen Hoblet, tenth.
Plane Geometry: Floyd Andress, third; William Chapman, fourth.
Algebra: Twyla Pifer, first; M. Alspaugh, fifth.
Biology: Eugene Wolfe, eighth.
Chemistry: Milton Schumm, first; Nancy Heacock, fourth.
General Science: Dick Cowan, ninth; Vera Andress, thirteenth.
Latin I: Ruth Alspaugh, first; Carl Ripley.
Latin II: Emilene Miller, first; Marjorie Pifer.
English 9: Ellen Schumm, second; William Stauton, fifth.
English 10: Donald Hoblet, sixth; Alice Bebout, eighth.
English 11: Albert Wyer, second; Kent Geisler, fourteenth.
English 12: Eugene Duff, eighth.
Typing 1: Edith Heacock, first.
Shorthand 2: Lola Schumm, second; Catherine Leininger, third.
Shorthand 1: Ruth Anna Voltz, third.
Bookkeeping: Helen Miller, third; Alice Handwerk, fourth. [2]

Helen (Miller) Linn

Helen (Miller) Linn

Impressive! Especially when I remember how lost I was in Latin II.

 

[1] The Willshire Herald, Willshire, Ohio, 21 March 1940, p.1.

[2] The Willshire Herald, Willshire, Ohio, 11 April 1940, p.1.

Jan 13

Tombstone Tuesday–Oscar F. Heffner

Oscar F. Heffner, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

Oscar F. Heffner, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Oscar F. Heffner, located in row 9 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

Oscar F.
Heffner
1896-1956

Oscar Heffner was born in Chattanooga, Ohio, on 27 June 1896 to Fredrick and Anna (Merkle) Heffner. He was baptized as Friedrich Oskar Heffner at Zion Chatt by Rev. P.J. Vollmar on 12 July 1896. His parents served as his baptismal sponsors. Oscar was confirmed at Zion Chatt on 9 April 1911 by Rev. George Haas.

Oscar registered for the WWI draft in Celina, Ohio, on 5 June 1918. He was living at RR 5 Rockford at that time and working for E.J. Drake in Mendon, Ohio. He had gray eyes and brown hair. [1] Oscar enlisted 5 September 1918 and served as a private in Co K 29 Engineers until his honorable discharge on 27 December 1918. [2]

Shortly after the war Oscar lived in a boarding house in Mendon and worked as a mechanic in a garage. [3] At some point during his life Oscar acquired the nickname Brownie.

Oscar Heffner married Lillian Kinkley at Zion Chatt on 29 October 1921 by Rev. Carl. H. Albrecht, who also served at their witness. Zion’s records indicate that Oscar was 25 years old and Lillian was 20 years old. She was born on 17 December 1901 in Mendon, Ohio, the daughter of Robert and Edith (Hall) Kinkley. At the time of their marriage Oscar was a mechanic and Lillian was a telephone operator. [4]

In 1930 Oscar lived on Main Street, Mendon, where he was the proprietor of a garage. Oscar indicated he was the head of the household and his brother Vernon lived with him. Oscar was 33 years of age and married while Vernon was 24 and single. Vernon was employed as a mechanic in the garage. Only Oscar and Vernon were enumerated in the household. Lillian was living with her parents, Robert and Edith Kinkley, on Wayne Street in Mendon. [5]

Oscar and Lillian divorced in 1937 [6] and Oscar still resided with his brother Vernon in 1940. Vernon, now the head of the household, was married to Carmella. The two Heffner brothers worked as mechanics in their garage. [7]

Oscar registered for the WWII draft, the “the old man’s registration,” in 1942. He was 45 years old at the time, self-employed, and living in Mendon. [8]

A few years later Oscar married a second time, marrying Dorothy Evelyn Patton on 9 December 1946 in Jay County, Indiana. The marriage was performed by Rev. Marshall N. Weaver. Dorothy was born 20 August 1918 in Ashville, North Carolina, the daughter of W. H. and Verna (Ball) Patton. She had also been married once before and had divorced in 1940. At the time of their marriage Oscar lived in Fort Wayne, Indiana, where he operated a service station. Dorothy lived in Decatur, Indiana, and was not employed. [6]

According to Zion Chatt’s records Oscar had made his home with his brother Vernon in Mendon for 39 years when he died of heart trouble at 9:45 p.m. on the evening of 27 September 1956 in a Celina hospital. Oscar was 60 years old and was buried on the 27th. Oscar’s obituary:

Oscar F. Heffner
Mendon
—Services will be at 2 p.m. Thursday in the Zion Lutheran Church, Chattanooga, for Oscar F. Heffner, 60, of here, who died Monday evening in the Gibbons Hospital, Celina, following a heart condition.

A lifelong resident of Mercer County, Mr. Heffner was a retired owner and operator of a service station and garage business here, in which, his brother, Vernon, was a partner. He was a veteran of World War I.

He is survived, in addition to his brother, Vernon, with whom he had made his home, by another brother, Rudolph, Chattanooga, and a sister, Mrs. Marguerite Roebuck, Fort Wayne.

The body will remain in the Vernon Heffner residence where friends may call until time of services. Burial will be in the church cemetery. [9]

No children were mentioned in any of the records.

Oscar and his second wife Dorothy must have divorced sometime before 1960 and it appears she took her maiden name back. Dorothy E. Patton married Lee F. Daniels on 9 March 1960 in San Luis Obispo, California. [10] Dorothy Evelyn Daniels died on 21 August 1996 in San Luis Obispo. [11]

 

[1] U.S. World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 digital images, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 11 January 2015), card for Oscar F. Heffner, no.180, Mercer County, Ohio, citing World War I Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, NARA microfilm publication M1509; imaged from FHL film roll 183519.

[2] Official Roster of Ohio Soldiers, Sailors and Marines in the World War, 1917-18 (Columbus, Ohio : The FJ Heer Printing Co., 1926), 7272; Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 11 January 2015).

[3] 1920 U.S. Census, Mendon, Mercer County, Ohio, ED 144, p.6B, dwelling 159, family 160, Gus Stelzer; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 11 January 2015); from NARA microfilm T625, roll 1418.

[4] “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-1997,” index and images, FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org : accessed 11 January 2015), Oscar F Heffner and Lillian Kinkley, 29 October 1921; citing Mercer County, Ohio, Marriages, Vol. 12, p.95; from FHL microfilm 2366955.

[5] 1930 U.S. Census, Mendon, Mercer County, Ohio, ED 25, p.1B, dwelling 24, family 24, Oscar F Heffner; and p.3A, dwelling 71, family 71, Robert S. Kinkley; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 11 January 2015); from NARA microfilm T626, roll 1850.

[6] “Indiana, Marriages, 1811-1959,” index and images, FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org : accessed 11 January 2015), Oscar Frederick Heffner and Dorothy Evelyn Patton, 9 December 1946; citing Jay, Indiana, County Clerk Offices, Vol. 17 p.460; from FHL microfilm 2169119.

[7] 1940 U.S. Census, Mendon, Mercer county, Ohio, ED 54-28, p.4B, household 91, Vernon Heffner; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 11 January 2015); from NARA microfilm T627, roll 3114.

[8] U.S. World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942, (Fourth Registration), Records of the Selective Service System, Record Group No. 147, NARA; digital images, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 11 January 2014).

[9] The Lima News, Lima, Ohio, 26 September 1956, p.14; Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 January 2015).

[10] “California, Marriage Index, 1960-1985,” index, FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org : accessed 13 January 2015), Lee F. Daniels and Dorothy E. Patton, 9 March 1960; from “California, Marriage Index, 1960-1985,” Ancestry, citing San Luis Obispo, California, Center of Health Statistics, California Department of Health Services, Sacramento.

[11] California Death Index, 1940-1997, State of California DOH, Center for Health Statistics, Sacramento, CA; Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 January 2015). Note: Dorothy E. Daniels, Social Security no. 237-26-7781, father’s surname Patton, mother’s maiden name Ball, born 20 August 1918 in North Carolina, died 21 August 1996 in San Luis Obispo, California.

 

 

Jan 09

Update on Schumm’s Old Brick Building

A few months ago I was seeking information about the old brick building that once stood by the railroad tracks at the north end of Schumm. The building, unknown to most today, generated a lot of interest and I appreciate those of you who wrote with information about it, helping to piece together its history.

From Tom Reichard, via his mother Betty, I learned that the building was used as a general store by Betty’s grandfather George Weinman. Betty’s dad Carl Weinman also ran a huckster wagon from there.

 

Brick building that once stood by the railroad tracks in Schumm, Ohio.

Brick building that once stood by the railroad tracks in Schumm, Ohio.

Hoping to learn some additional information, I decided to ask another person about the brick building. Someone who also would likely remember the building and who was probably even inside it. Someone who was born in Schumm over 100 years ago.

So yesterday I called and talked to Karl Schumm. At 101 years young, Karl is doing quite well and also has a very good memory.

Karl was born in Schumm in 1913, the son of Gustavus Jacob and Dorathea Elizabeth (Bienz) Schumm. He was born in a house near where the old brick building once stood, the second house south of the railroad tracks on the west side of Schumm Road.

Karl did not know when the brick building was built but said that when he was a young boy his father owned the building and ran a general store in it. The store was situated in its north half and Schumm’s post office was also run out of their store at that time. The south side of the building was used for storage.

Karl said the train used to stop there and drop off the mail and supplies for the general store.

Karl recalls getting all the crackers he wanted from a barrel in his father’s store. He said he really enjoyed the crackers, although they were usually stale. He did not recall the store having any candy.

Karl said there was a community well at the store and people would go there to get their water. He also recalls that their family had two mules and he thought the mules may have pulled a huckster wagon.

His father Gustavas sold the store in about 1916 or 1917 to George Weinman. He does not recall when the building was razed, but it appears it was destroyed after 1929, since Betty (Weinman) Reichard remembers it.

Karl’s family moved from Schumm in 1923, when Karl was about ten years old. They moved a few miles north, near to route 224. Karl was confirmed at St. Thomas in 1927, in the last German-speaking confirmation class.

As the attendees of last year’s Schumm reunion saw and heard, Karl still remembers German. He sang his confirmation hymn in German for all his Schumm relatives at the reunion. Karl even spoke some German to me on the phone yesterday. I have no idea what he said.

Karl Schumm, 100, sings a hymn in German. (2014 photo by Karen)

Karl Schumm, 100, sings a hymn in German at the Schumm reunion. (2014 photo by Karen)

I had a nice visit with Karl on the phone. I asked him how he liked this cold weather. He said he did not and questioned the whole idea of global warming.

Yes, Karl is pretty sharp at 101!

I will post additional information about this old Schumm building as I discover it.

Jan 06

Tombstone Tuesday–Albert C. & Ethel (Olson) Heffner

Albert & Ethel Heffner, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

Albert & Ethel Heffner, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Albert C. and Ethel Heffner, located in row 9 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

HEFFNER
Albert C.
Jan. 9, 1888
Mar. 4, 1945
Ethel
1892-1979

Albert Conrad Heffner was born in Chattanooga on 9 January 1888, the second child born to Fredrick and Anna (Merkle) Heffner. He was baptized at Zion Chatt on 22 January 1888 with Conrad Heffner and Magdalena Kessler as his sponsors.

Albert was confirmed with his older brother George “Rudolph” at Zion on 31 March 1901 by Rev. R.V. Schmitt.

Albert registered for the World War I draft on 5 June 1917. At that time he lived at 553 E. Livingston Street, Celina, Ohio, where he was employed as a piano dealer. He was single and described himself as medium height and weight with blue eyes and blonde hair. [1]

Albert enlisted in the Regular Army at Columbus, Ohio, on 27 October 1917. He served in several Balloon Companies during World War I: the 1st Balloon Squadron, Fort Omaha, Nebraska, until 15 March 1918; in the 64th Balloon Company until 12 July 1918; in the 66th Balloon Company AS until 13 January 1919; and in 52nd Balloon Company until his honorable Discharge on 28 January 1919. He also held the rank of corporal and later sergeant. [2]

Albert Heffner military marker, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

Albert Heffner military marker, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

After the war Albert returned home to Celina. In 1920 he was unmarried and living with his sister Emma and her husband Jake Bauer. They all lived on East Livingston Street and Albert and his brother-in-law Jake were salesmen in a music store. [3]

Albert Heffner married Ethel Olson soon after, but I was unable to locate their marriage record. In 1930 the couple lived on Price Street in Rockford, Illinois. Albert was 42 and Ethel was 43 in this record. It also indicates they had been married ten years, so they probably married about 1920. Albert was a general salesman and Ethel was not employed. This record indicates that Ethel was born in Wisconsin. [4]

Albert and Ethel still resided in Rockford, Illinois, in 1940, living at 1526 16th Avenue, the same house they were living in in 1935. Albert C. was 52 years old and Ethel O. was 48. Ethel’s father, John Olson, age 76, was living with them at that time. John Olson was born in Sweden and this record indicates that Ethel was born in Illinois and Albert in Ohio. Albert was the manager of an electric appliance store and Ethel was a bookkeeper. [5]

Albert registered for the “old man’s registration” in April 1942, for World War II. At that time the Heffners lived on 16th Avenue in Rockford, Illinois, where he worked at a Maytag Shop. He was 54 years old and stated that he was born in Chattanooga, Ohio, on 9 January 1888. [6]

According to Zion Chatt’s records Albert Heffner died of a heart attack on 4 March 1945, at the age of 57 years, 1 month, and 26 days. He was buried on the 8th. Survivors included his wife Ethel; brothers Rudolph, Oscar, and Vernon; and his sister Marguerite. His Illinois death record indicates he died on 4 March 1945 in Winnebago, Illinois, at the age of 57 years. It also indicates that he was married to Ethel “Olsen.” [7]

The application for his military marker indicates he enlisted 27 October 1917 and was honorably discharged 28 January 1919. He held the rank of sergeant in the 51st Co. Balloon Co. Air Service in Arcadia, California, and his serial no. was 922312. Albert died 4 March 1945. The marker is inscribed with a Christian emblem. This record was signed by his widow, Ethel O. Heffner, 521 Indiana Terrace, Rockford, Illinois, on 18 June 1945.  [8]

Application for Headstone or Marker, Albert C. Heffner.

Application for Headstone or Marker, Albert C. Heffner.

Death notice:

Albert C. Heffner
Chattanooga, Mar. 7
Funeral services will be conducted Thursday afternoon at Zion Lutheran church at Chattanooga for the late Albert C. Heffner, 57, former Mercer-co man, who died Sunday in Illinois. Burial will be in the church cemetery. [9]

Ethel Olson was born 16 April 1892, possibly in Wisconsin, or Illinois. She died 26 September 1979 in Deland, Volusia, Florida, and was buried in Zion Chatt’s cemetery on the 29th. [10]

The couple did not have any children.

 

[1] “U.S. World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918,” digital images, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 January 2015), card for Albert Carl Heffner, no. 1340, Mercer County, Ohio citing World War I Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, NARA microfilm publication M1509, imaged from FHL film roll 183519.

[2] Official Roster Ohio Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, World War, 1917-1918 (Columbus, Ohio : FJ Heer Printing Co., 1926), 7271; Ancestry.com (www.ancestry : accessed 4 January 2015).

[3] 1920 U.S. Census, Celina, Mercer, Ohio, ED 137, p.8A, dwelling 187, family 188, Jake Baner; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 January 2015); from NARA microfilm T625, roll 1418.

[4] 1930 U.S. Census, Rockford, Winnebago, Illinois, ED 32, p.23A, dwelling, family, Albert C. Heffner; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 January 2015); from FHL microfilm 2340307, from NARA microfilm T626, roll 572.

[5] 1940 U.S. Census, Rockford, Winnebago, Illinois, ED 101-62 , p.61B, household no. 221, Albert C. Heffner; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 January 2014); from NARA microfilm T627, roll 914.

[6] U.S. World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942 (Fourth Registration), for the State of Illinois; National Archives at St. Louis, Missouri; Microfilm Series M2097, roll 118; Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 January 2015).

[7] “Illinois Deaths and Stillbirths, 1916-1947,” index, FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org : accessed 2 January 2015), Albert Conrad Heffner, 4 March 1945; Public Board of Health, Archives, Springfield; from FHL microfilm 1984183.

[8] U.S., Headstone Applications for Military Veterans, 1925-1963, Ancestry.com (www.Ancestry.com : accessed 4 January 2015), from Applications for Headstones for U.S. Military Veterans, 1925-1941, microfilm publication M1916, ARC ID: 596118, NARA Record Group 92.

[9] The Lima News, Lima, Ohio, 7 March 1945, p.4.

[10] Ethel Heffner, Illinois Issue State no. 331-05-3079, Social Security Death Index 1935-2014, Ancestry.com, (www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 January 2015).

 

Jan 01

Happy New Year 2015!

Happy New Year!

Today, the first day of 2015, I am not even going to mention last year’s resolutions. Since I have done so poorly with them I do not see any point in bringing up the same old unfinished goals yet another year.

I will only say that genealogical organization is an ongoing process and a struggle for me. I am beginning to believe that I will never be organized to the point I hope and expect.

Ditto for the goal of digitizing photos and documents.

However, one of my project goals will soon be realized. Finally! This project has been on my to-do list for several years now and I finally took the bull by the horns, taking the easy way out by having someone else do it. I will not say much about this project right now but will write about it later, after I receive the finished product. I will just say that it involves old home movies…

New Year PCSo on this day, the first day of 2015, I am going to say farewell to 2014 and look back at the year by listing some of my favorite 2014 blog posts, followed by reader’s favorites.

My favorites represent a compilation of my research put into writing, which fulfills several of my long-term goals–to research, organize, and write the results. Some posts generated a lot of interest and I learned something from my readers’ knowledge and help.

Karen’s favorite 2014 Karen’s Chatt posts, in no particular order:

Day Books and Hucksters

Private Hallot Bryan in the Civil War

Looking Around with Google Earth

Chattanooga on Google Earth

The Flourist

Four Rüeck Sisters

Lunch with Darrel “Pete” Brewster

One Old Postcard

One That Got Away—Seeking Information about Schumm

It Came from Under the Summer Kitchen

Holmes County, Ohio, 2014

Readers’ favorites, starting with number 1:

A Wild Man in the Woods

Charles Schumm Residence, 1908

The Post Office at Schumm

The Schumm Sawmill

About Grandmothers

Reunion Wrap-Up

This & That from the Willshire Herald

One That Got Away—Seeking Information about Schumm

Lunch with Darrel “Pete” Brewster

Another Schumm Centenarian

It Came from Under the Summer Kitchen

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May the New Year bring you health, happiness, and prosperity! And may you achieve many of your dreams and goals in 2015.

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