Oct 06

Schumm Elevator Burned, 1972

The year was 1972 and there was a big fire in the little village of Schumm, Ohio.

Recently I wrote a couple blog posts about the Willshire Grain & Supply elevators that were located in Willshire, Wren, and Schumm for several decades, from the1940s to the early 1980s.

My mom worked as a bookkeeper at the elevator in Willshire for 33 years. The owner, Tom Burk, closed the Schumm elevator in the mid-late 1960s and sold the other two elevators in 1981. The Wren elevator closed not long after the sale and was eventually torn down.

The Willshire elevator is still standing but the one in Schumm was burned down in 1972.

It should come as no surprise that my parents were there that day, taking photos as they burned the Schumm elevator.

Here are some photos from that day:

Schumm Elevator, 1972, looking southeast.

The Schumm elevator was located near the railroad tracks that once ran east and west on the north edge of town. My mom said there was a railroad spur going to the elevator.

Schumm Elevator, 1972.

Does someone know if that is the Schumm sawmill off to the right, back a distance?

It was a controlled burn and practice for both the Willshire and Wren Fire Departments.

Schumm Elevator burn, 1972.

 

Schumm Elevator, 1972.

Schumm Elevator, 1972.

Schumm Elevator, 1972.

A crowd, young and old, gathered to watch the burning.

Schumm Elevator, 1972.

The railroad tracks are no longer there either.

These photos may bring back some memories of the Schumm elevator.

 

Oct 03

Tombstone Tuesday–Abraham & Amanda M. (Brush) Bollenbacher

Abraham & Amanda M (Brush) Bollenbacher, Kessler Cemetery, Mercer County, Ohio. (2017 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Abraham and Amanda M. (Brush) Bollenbacher, located in row 8 of Kessler Cemetery, Liberty Township Mercer County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

BOLLENBACHER
Amanda M
1889-1954
Abraham
1884-1940

Abraham Bollenbacher was born 8 December 1884 in Jefferson Township, Adams County, Indiana, the son of Jacob and Margaret (Huffman) Bollenbacher. [1]

In 1900 Abraham lived with his parents and his 4 siblings in Adams County, Indiana. In their household: Jacob, 51; Margaret, 44; August William, 21; Dora C, 18; Jesse Charles, 16; Abraham, 16; and Rosa C, 13. Three of Abraham’s siblings were deceased by this time. Abraham’s father Jacob was a farmer who immigrated in 1871. [2]

Abraham Bollenbacher married Amanda May Brush in Mercer County, Ohio, on 22 June 1907. Abraham was 23 and Amanda had just turned 18 the week before. Abraham lived in Adams County, Indiana, and Amanda lived in Blackcreek Township, Mercer County. Abraham was a farmer and neither had been married before. They were married by J.E. Pifer, Justice of the Peace. [3]  

Amanda Brush was born 15 June 1889 in Shelby County, Ohio, the daughter of Samuel and Clarabelle (Mercer) Brush. [4]

In 1900 the Brush family lived in Blackcreek Township, Mercer County, Ohio. The family in 1900: Samuel, 42; Clara B, 39; Joseph E, 18; Amanda M, 11; and Ivan, 7. Amanda’s parents had been married 21 years and all four of their children were living. All of the family members were born in Ohio and Samuel farmed. [5]

In 1910 Abraham and Amanda had been married 3 years and lived in Hopewell Township, Mercer County, Ohio. Their household in 1910: Abraham, 26; Amanda, 21; and Mildred, 1 year and 11 months. Mildred was the couple’s only child at this time. This enumeration indicates that Abraham and Mildred were born in Indiana and Amanda was born in Ohio. Abraham farmed and they rented their home. [6]

Their daughter Mildred died in 1914. [7]

In 1920 the Bollenbacher family lived in a rented home in Hopewell Township, Mercer County: Abraham, 35; Amanda M, 30; and Isabell, 4 months. Isabell was born in Ohio. [8]

Abraham, Amanda, and their daughter Isabell moved to Blackcreek Township sometime before 1935. Their household in 1940: Abraham, 55; Amanda, 50; Isabell, 20. Abraham farmed and Amanda was a housewife. Abraham and Amanda both had both completed the 8th grade and their daughter Isabell had completed 4 years of high school. [9]

Abraham Bollenbacher died 8 September 1940 at the Adams County Memorial Hospital in Decatur, Indiana, 3 days after a farm accident that was caused by a runaway horse. The accident resulted in a broken leg and an open wound which lead to gangrene. He was 55 years old. Abraham was buried on the 11th with Ketcham Brothers, Rockford, in charge of the arrangements. His wife Amanda, of RR Rockford, was the informant for the information on his death certificate. [1]

Abraham’s obituary:
INJURIES ARE FATAL TO MAN
Abe Bollenbacher Of Near Rockford Dies Sunday Night
Abe Bollenbacher, 55, farmer of near Rockford, Ohio, died at 11 o’clock Sunday night at the Adams County Memorial Hospital, as the result of injuries sustained last Thursday afternoon. Bollenbacher suffered a fractured right leg in attempting to halt a runaway horse. He was brought to the local hospital. Death was caused by gangrene. The Ohio farmer is survived by the widow and one daughter, Mrs. Isabelle Lautzenheiser, at home. Bollenbacher attempted to halt the horse as it bolted while being ridden by the victim’s 10-year-old cousin, Norbert Bollenbacher. When he grabbed the horse, it threw him to the ground, causing his injuries. Funeral arrangements had not been completed at a late hour this afternoon. [10]

Amanda (Brush) Bollenbacher died 27 November 1954 in the Adams County Memorial Hospital Decatur, Indiana, at the age of 65 years. Her death certificate indicates that she was a widow, born 15 June 1889 in Ohio. The cause of death was a small bowel obstruction from metastatic rectal cancer. Amanda was a housewife and lived a mile north and a mile east of Chatt. Her name was recorded as Amanda A. Bollenbacher and her parents were reportedly Samuel and Clarabelle (Mercer) Brush. She was buried on the 29th with Zwick Funeral Home in charge of the arrangements. Mrs. Gerald Lautzenheiser was the informant for the information on Amanda’s death certificate. [4] 

Amanda’s obituary:
Mrs. Amanda M. Bollenbacher, 65, of near Chattanooga, died at 3:30 a.m. Saturday in Adams Co., Ind., Memorial Hospital. She had been ill eight weeks. Mrs. Bollenbacher was born in Shelby Co. on June 15, 1889, a daughter of Samuel and Clarabelle Mercer Brush. She was a member of Bethel Brethren Church. Surviving are a daughter, Mrs. Gerald Lautzenheiser of Rockford; two grandchildren, Duane D. and Glen Ellis Lautzenheiser; a brother, Ivan Brush of New Port Ritchey, Fla., and a sister, Mrs. Adam Kaylor of St. Marys. Her husband, Abraham, died in 1940. One daughter and one brother are deceased. Services were conducted at 2 p.m. Monday at Bethel Brethren Church. Rev. Ord Gehman officiated. Burial in Kessler Cemetery near Chattanooga. [11] 

 

Abraham and Amanda (Brush) Bollenbacher had the following children:
Mildred B (1908-1914)
Isabel B (1919-2000), married Gerald L Lautzenheiser

 

[1] Indiana, Death Certificates, 1899-2011, Year 1940, roll 11, Abraham Bollenbacher, 8 Sep 1940; digital image, Ancestry.com; Indiana Death Certificates, 1900-2011, Indiana State Board of Health, Indiana Archives and Records Administration, Indianapolis.

[2] 1900 U.S. Census, Jefferson, Adams, Indiana, ED 4, p.6A, dwelling 104, household 104, Jacob Bullenbacher; Ancestry.com; FHL microfilm 1240357, NARA microfilm T623, roll 357.

[3] “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” database with images, FamilySearch.org, Abe Bollenbacher & Manda Brush, 22 Jun 1907; Mercer Marriages, Vol. 9, p.341; FHL microfilm 914958.

[4] Indiana, Death Certificates, 1899-2011, Year 1954, roll 11, Amanda A Bollenbacher, 27 Nov 1954; digital image, Ancestry.com; Indiana Death Certificates, 1900-2011, Indiana State Board of Health, Indiana Archives and Records Administration, Indianapolis.

[5] 1900 U.S. Census, Black Creek, Mercer, Ohio, ED 74, p.9B, dwelling & family 189, Samuel Brush; Ancestry.com; FHL microfilm 1241303, NARA microfilm T623, roll 1303.

[6] 1910 U.S. Census, Hopewell, Mercer, Ohio, ED 115, p.8A, dwelling & family 156, Abrams Bollenbacher; Ancestry.com; FHL microfilm 1375227, NARA microfilm T624, roll 1214.

[7] FindaGrave.com, Mildred B Bollenbacher, Memorial #22547365.

[8] 1920 U.S. Census, Hopewell, Mercer, Ohio, ED 135, p.10B, dwelling 198, family 208, Abe Bollenbacher; Ancestry.com, NARA microfilm T625, roll 1418.

[9] 1940 U.S. Census, Black Creek, Mercer, Ohio, ED 54-1, p.10A, household visited 196, Ab Bollenbacher; Ancestry.com; NARA microfilm T627, roll 3114.

[10] FindaGrave.com, Abraham Bollenbacher, Memorial #22547558.

[11] FindaGrave.com, Amanda May Brush Bollenbacher, Memorial #22547469.

 

Sep 29

Nuts to Hickory Nuts

We decided to take advantage of the nice fall weather this past week by taking a drive along the woods. On our little ride we noticed a hickory nut tree loaded with nuts. Some of the nuts had already fallen to the ground.

Shagbark hickory nut tree, 2017.

This must be the one of the better years for hickory nuts. Hickory nuts are on a 3-year cycle—producing a lot of nuts one year, a moderate amount one year, and hardly any nuts the third year.

Hickory nuts are a healthy wild food. I am most familiar with the shagbark hickory but there are actually 17 varieties of hickory trees, 13 that are native to the U.S.

Shagbark hickory nuts.

Many people really like hickory nuts and consider them quite a treat. Farmers often left a lone hickory tree in the middle of a field and farmed around it so they could gather the tasty nuts in the fall. My grandpa Miller left a hickory nut tree in the field south of the house and I remember that my Aunt Ann would make hickory nut cake. My dad liked the hickory nuts, too.

I remember my parents saying that hickory nuts are one of the hardest nuts to shell. The hard inner shell is surrounded by a thicker, woody shell called the husk. The husk is green at first and the nuts fall to the ground in late summer when the husks begin to turn dark brown.

Inside the husk is the hard shell and it is very hard to crack open. Suggestions for cracking the shell include using a vice, a hammer, or covering them with plywood and driving over them. Others suggest soaking them in hot water for an hour so the shell splits open rather than shattering all over.

Hickory nuts.

I remember when grandma Schumm stayed with my parents to recover after her surgery. My mom put grandma to work shelling hickory nuts to pass the time. She called it therapy but it sounds like it was a whole lot of work for poor grandma.

My mom used hickory nuts in several ways–in hickory nut cake, in dessert toppings, and as part of the topping for sweet potato soufflé. I don’t recall that she ever made a hickory nut pie but I have seen recipes for them, too. My mom would freeze her excess shelled hickory nuts.

Me? I try to avoid eating anything that has hickory nuts in it. Although I like the smell of the hickory nut husks I prefer the taste of walnuts and pecans. But most of all I have the unfortunate luck of always finding a little part of the shell when I eat something with hickory nuts. Always! It is just a wonder that I have not broken a tooth on one of those shells.

Here are two hickory nut cake recipes my mom had highlighted in her cookbook:

Hickory Nut Cake:
1 box white or yellow cake mix
4 eggs
¾ cup oil
1 pkg instant vanilla pudding
8 oz (1 cup) 7Up
1 cup hickory nuts
Bake 40 min. at 350 degrees.

Icing:
½ cup flour
1 cup milk
Cook till thick, like mashed potatoes. Cool.
Beat together and add to above mixture:
½ cup oleo
½ cup Crisco
1 cup sugar
Sprinkle nuts on top.

White Nut Cake:
¾ cup shortening
1 ½ cup sugar
2 ¾ cup cake flour
3 t baking powder
½ t salt
1 cup milk
½ t cream of tartar
1 t vanilla
1 cup hickory nuts, chopped
4 egg whites, stiffly beaten

Cream shortening with sugar. Sift dry ingredients; add alternately with milk to first mixture. Beat thoroughly; add vanilla and nuts. Carefully fold in egg whites. Pour into greased 9” layer pans and bake 30 minutes at 375 degrees.

Just be careful. Be very, very careful when you eat those hickory nuts. There may be some shell parts lurking inside.

Sep 26

Tombstone Tuesday–Dora C. (Bollenbacher) Anspaugh

Dora C. (Bollenbacher) Anspaugh, Kessler Cemetery, Mercer County, Ohio. (2017 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Dora C. (Bollenbacher) Anspaugh, located in row 9 of Kessler Cemetery, Mercer County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

DORA C.
Wife of
JAMES L.
ANSPAUGH
Died May 17, 1902
Aged 20 Y. 10 M. 10 D.
ANSPAUGH

Dearest Dora we must lay thee
In the peaceful grave’s embrace
But thy memory will be cherished
Till we see thy heavenly face

Dora Catharine Bollenbacher was born 7 July 1881 in Adams County, Indiana, the daughter of Jacob and Margaret (Huffman) Bollenbacher. [1]

I could not find much information about Dora. She was born a year after the 1880 census was taken and died two years after the 1900 census was taken. She died young and she was not mentioned in Zion Chatt’s records.

In 1900 Dora (Bollenbacher) lived with her parents and four of her siblings in Jefferson Township, Adams County, Indiana. In the household: Jacob, 51; Margaret, 44; August William, 21; Dora C, 18; Jesse Charles, 16; Abraham, 16; and Rosa C, 13. [2]

Dora Bollenbather married James L. Anspaugh within the next two years, but I could not find their marriage record on-line.

James and Dora had a child, a son, Wilbert T. Anspaugh, born in Indiana on 14 May 1902, born three days before Dora’s death. [3]

Dora (Bollenbacher) Anspaugh died 17 May 1902 in Jefferson Township, Adams County, Indiana. She died of acute miliary tuberculosis, which she had for 3 months. She was only 20 years, 10 months, and 10 days old. Her death certificate indicates that she was married. Dora was buried on the 19th with C.C. Clark of Geneva in charge of the funeral arrangements. Charles Bollenbacher of Chatt was the informant for the information on her death certificate. [1] This was likely her brother Charles.

Dora C. (Bollenbacher) Anspaugh, Kessler Cemetery. (2017 photo by Karen)

I do not know what happened to Dora’s husband James L. Anspaugh after her death, but it appears that Dora’s parents Jacob and Margaret (Huffman) Bollenbacher raised Dora’s son (and their grandson) Wilbert T. Anspaugh. Wilbert lived with Jacob and Margaret in 1910 and 1920, enumerated as their grandson in both censuses. [4] [5]  

Dora (Bollenbacher) Anspaugh and her husband James L. had one child:
Wilbert T (1902-1986), married Marie I Overholt

 

[1] Indiana, Death Certificates, Year 1902, roll 1, Dora C Anspaugh 17 May 1902; digital image, Ancestry.com; Indiana Death Certificates, 1899-2011, Indiana State Board of Health, Indiana Archives and Records Administration, Indianapolis.

[2] 1900 U.S. Census, Jefferson, Adams, Indiana, ED 4, p.6A, dwelling 104, household 104, Jacob Bullenbacher; Ancestry.com; FHL microfilm 1240357, NARA microfilm T623, roll 357.

[3] Indiana, Death Certificates, Year 1986, roll 12, Wilbert T Anspaugh, 30 Aug 1986; digital image, Ancestry.com; Indiana Death Certificate, 1899-2011, Indiana State Board of Health, Indiana Archives and Records Administration, Indianapolis.

[4] 1910 U.S. Census, Jefferson, Adams, Indiana, ED 4, p.2A, dwelling & family 29, Jacob Bollenbacher; Ancestry.com; FHL microfilm 1374351, NARA microfilm T624, roll 338.

[5] 1920 U.S. Census, Jefferson, Adams, Indiana, ED 4, p.6B, dwelling 119, family 129, Jacob Bollenbacher; Ancestry.com; NARA microfilm T625, roll 420.

Sep 22

Old Advertising Items from Willshire Grain & Supply

Last week I wrote about Willshire Grain & Supply, where my mom worked as their bookkeeper for 33 years. The three local grain elevators were owned by Tom Burk and were located in Willshire, Schumm, and Wren, Ohio.

Willshire Grain & Supply at Willshire, Ohio, 1948.

As was the practice of many businesses, Willshire Grain & Supply gave away advertising items, especially at Christmastime.

I still have a few of these give-aways from the 1960-70s. I remember seeing them years ago and my mom had saved them all those years. We found them again when we cleaned out her house. Here are a few of them from Willshire Grain & Supply:

Various advertising items from Willshire Grain & Supply, 1960s-1970s

A metal rain gauge:

“Rain or Shine
We are here to serve you
Willshire Grain & Supply
Grain, Seeds
Fertilizer, Feed, Coal
Willshire, Wren, Schumm, Ohio”

Rain gauge from Willshire Grain & Supply.

A small tape measure:

A small tape measure from Willshire Grain & Supply.

A trivet that could be hung in your kitchen:

A trivet from Willshire Grain & Supply.

Another ceramic trivet, although this one does not specifically advertise Willshire Grain & Supply:

Pens, pencils, and pocket knives that advertise Master Mix feed in addition to Willshire Grain & Supply:

Pens, pencils, and pocket knives from Willshire Grain & Supply.

A pencil and pocket knife from Purina, but they do not advertise the grain elevator:

Pencil and pocket knife from Purina.

Some items from Wayne Feeds, Mayflower Mills, and Central Soya. The Central Soya tie tacks belonged to my grandpa Miller, who worked there.

Advertising items from Wayne Feeds, Mayflower Mills, and 2 tie tacks from Central Soya.

I am not sure what the sharp roller item on the key ring would have been used for. To perforate paper for some reason?

These old advertising items sure bring back the memories!

Older posts «

» Newer posts