Jul 01

Independence Day 2016

This coming Monday is the Fourth of July, also known as Independence Day. It has been 240 years since the Continental Congress officially adopted the Declaration of Independence, declaring that the thirteen colonies were no longer part of Great Britain but were independent sovereign states that were part of a new nation.

Below are some patriotic quotes about liberty and freedom and America.

“Liberty cannot be established without morality, nor morality without faith.” — French historian Alexis de Toqueville, Democracy in America.

“Freedom is the open window through which pours the sunlight of the human spirit and human dignity.” –Herbert Hoover

Resthaven Memory Gardens, Auglaize County, Ohio. (2014 by Karen)

Resthaven Memory Gardens, Auglaize County, Ohio. (2014 by Karen)

“I will walk about in freedom, for I have sought out your precepts.” –Psalm 119:45 (NIV)

“Where liberty dwells, there is my country.” –Benjamin Franklin

“In my anguish I cried to the Lord, and he answered by setting me free.” –Psalm 118:5 (NIV)

“I sought for the greatness and genius of America in her commodious harbors and her ample rivers – and it was not there . . . in her fertile fields and boundless forests and it was not there . . . in her rich mines and her vast world commerce – and it was not there . . . in her democratic Congress and her matchless Constitution – and it was not there. Not until I went into the churches of America and heard her pulpits aflame with righteousness did I understand the secret of her genius and power. America is great because she is good, and if America ever ceases to be good, she will cease to be great.”  –French historian Alexis de Toqueville, Democracy in America.

“But what do we mean by the American Revolution? Do we mean the American war? The Revolution was effected before the war commenced. The Revolution was in the minds and hearts of the people; a change in their religious sentiments, of their duties and obligations … This radical change in the principles, opinions, sentiments, and affections of the people was the real American Revolution.” –John Adams

July_Fourth_Clip_Art

“We must be free not because we claim freedom, but because we practice it.” –William Faulkner

“Live as people who are free, not using your freedom as a cover-up for evil, but living as servants of God.” –1st Peter 2:16

“Those who won our independence believed liberty to be the secret of happiness and courage to be the secret of liberty.” –Louis D. Brandeis

“And I’m proud to an American, where at least I know I’m free. And I won’t forget the men who died, who gave that right to me.” –Lee Greenwood

The American’s Creed was the winning submission in a 1917 national writing contest for a creed of the United States. William Tyler Page used phrases from the Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution and Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address in his entry. The American’s Creed was adopted by the U.S. House of Representatives in 1918. We recite it at our DAR meetings:

The American’s Creed
I believe in the United States of America as a government of the people, by the people, for the people; whose just powers are derived from the consent of the governed; a democracy in a republic; a sovereign Nation of many sovereign States; a perfect union, one and inseparable; established upon those principles of freedom, equality, justice, and humanity for which American patriots sacrificed their lives and fortunes.

I therefore believe it is my duty to my country to love it, to support it Constitution, to obey its laws, to respect its flag, and to defend it against all enemies. —William Tyler Page

Finally, for a different and healthy dinner on the Fourth, try salmon and peas. Salmon and peas has been a New England Fourth of July tradition for hundreds of years because fresh garden peas were ready at the same time the salmon run. Sounds delicious to me!

Have a happy and safe Fourth of July!

Jun 28

Tombstone Tuesday–Joseph & Lucinda (Kantner) Merkle

Joseph & Lucinda (Kantner) Merkle, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

Joseph & Lucinda (Kantner) Merkle, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Joseph and Lucinda Merkle, located in row 1 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

Joseph
1835-1901
Lucinda
His Wife
1843-1919
MERKLE

Several census enumerations indicate that Joseph was born in Germany but none of the documents I have looked at on-line indicate who his parents were. His Mercer County death record does not name his parents and neither his death nor his burial is recorded in Zion Chatt’s records.

I noticed that Merkle was occasionally spelled Merkley and Kantner was sometimes spelled Kentner in some records.

Joseph Merkle married Lucinda Kantner 29 January 1860 in Auglaize County, Ohio. His name was recorded as Merkley and hers as Kentner on their marriage record. [1]

Lucinda was very likely the daughter of Elias/Eli and Elizabeth (Oswalt/Oswald) Kantner. A Lucinda Kantner, the same birth year, was enumerated in the 1850 and 1860 censuses in the Eli Kantner household in Auglaize County, Ohio. Note that the 1850 and 1860 censuses do not show family relationships. However her father Eli applied for her marriage application since she was only 16 years old and needed permission to marry. [1]

The Eli Kantner household, Auglaize County, in 1850: Eli Kantner, 31, born in Pennsylvania; Elizabeth, 28, Ohio; Israel, 10; Catharine, 9; Lucinda, 7; Leah, 5; William, 4; and Mary, 1. All of their children were born in Ohio and Eli was a farmer. [2]

In 1860 the Eli Kantner family still lived in Pusheta Township, Auglaize County. In the household: Elias, 40, born in Ohio; Elizabeth, 38, Ohio; Israel, 19; Catherine, 18; Lucinda, 16; Lena, 15; William, 13; Mary, 11; Rebecca, 8; Emeline, 6; Sarah J, 4; Michael, 2; and Levi, 5 months. All the children were born in Ohio. Lucinda Kantner was 16 years old and her occupation was domestic. [3]

The problem here is that Lucinda  married Joseph Merkle in January 1860 but she was enumerated with her family on 23 June 1860. Where was her husband Joseph Merkle when the census was taken?

The 1870 census was the first census in which I found Joseph Merkle. In 1870 the Joseph Merkle family lived in Wapakoneta, Auglaize County: Joseph, 34, born in Germany; Lucinda, 26, Ohio; Mary M, 9; Elizabeth, 4; Anna, 2; and John, 5 months. All the children were born in Ohio and Joseph was a blacksmith. [4]

The Joseph Merkle family moved to neighboring Mercer County by 1876, where their son Friedrich was baptized at Zion Chatt in September of that year. In 1880 they resided in Chattanooga where Joseph was a blacksmith in the village. Their household in 1880: Joseph, 44, Wuerttemberg; Lucinda, 37, Ohio, wife; Mary, 19; Elisabeth, 14; Anna, 12; John M, 10; Frederic, 8; Emma, 5; and William, 3.  [5]

Joseph, Lucinda, and their family attended Zion Lutheran Church when they lived in Chattanooga. Lucinda was confirmed as an adult at Zion on 17 May 1885 and over the years several of their children and grandchildren were baptized, confirmed, and married there. Lucinda’s confirmation record gives her date of birth as 12 October 1842 but does not give the names of her parents.

Their Liberty Township household in 1900: Joseph Merkle, 64, Germany; Lucinda, 56, Ohio; William, 23; Edward, 17; and Leo, 11. This census indicates Joseph immigrated in 1852 and that Lucinda had given birth to 10 children but that only 8 were living in 1900. Lucinda and all the children were born in Ohio. Joseph’s occupation was day labor. [6]

Joseph Merkle died 11 April 1901 in Liberty Township, Mercer County, Ohio, at the age of 35. His occupation was a blacksmith and he was born in Germany. [7]

In 1910 Lucinda, age 66 and a widow, lived in Liberty Township with her son Leo, age 21. Leo worked as a clerk in a general store in Chatt. This census also indicates that Lucinda had given birth to 10 children and 8 were living at that time. It also indicates that her parents were born in Pennsylvania. [8]

According to Zion Chatt’s records Lucinda Merkle died of asthma and dropsy on 20 November 1919 in Mercer County, Ohio. She was buried on the 23rd with Rev. J.E. Albrecht in charge of the service. The church records indicate that Lucinda was survived by 2 sisters, 1 brother, 4 sons and daughters, 24 grandchildren, 9 great-grandchildren.

Joseph and Lucinda (Kantner) Merkle had the following nine children that I could identify, but the 1900 and 1910 censuses report that she had given birth to ten children.

Maria “Mary” (1861-1954), married Rev. A.J. Feeger
Elisabeth (1865-1924), married Jacob Joseph Heffner
Anna (1867-1935), married Friedrich Heffner
John Francis (1869/70-1895)
Friedrich (1872-?)
Emma (1874-1950), married Conrad Heffner
William (1877-1959), married Bertha Short
Joseph “Edward” (1882-1952), married Nellie Dull
Leo (1888-?), married Clara Baker

 

[1] “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” database with images, FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org : accessed 26 Jun 2016), Joseph Merkley and Lucinda Kentner, 29 Jan 1860; from Auglaize County Marriages Vol. 2, p.241, from FHL microfilm 963056.

[2] 1850 U.S. Census, Pusheta, Auglaize, Ohio, p.335A, dwelling & family 608, Eli Kentner; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 26 Jun 2016); from NARA microfilm M432, roll 660.

[3] 1860 U.S. Census, Pusheta, Auglaize, Ohio, p.426, dwelling 512, family 496, Elias Kantner; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 26 Jun 2016); from FHL microfilm 803931, from NARA microfilm M653, roll 931.

[4] 1870 U.S. Census, Wapakoneta, Auglaize County, Ohio, p. 36 (penned), dwelling 304, family 298, Joseph Merkley; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 May 2014); from FHL film 552671, from NARA film M593, roll 1172.

[5] 1880 U.S. Census, Liberty, Mercer County, Ohio, ED 188, p. 2 (penned), dwelling 13, family 14, Joseph Markrle; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 May 2014); from FHL microfilm 1255048, from NARA microfilm T9, roll 1048.

[6] 1900 U.S. Census, Liberty, Mercer, Ohio, ED 85, p.10A, dwelling 186, family 191, Joseph Merkle; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 26 Jun 2016); from FHL microfilm 1241304, from NARA microfilm T623, roll 1304.

[7] “Ohio, County Death Records, 1840-2001,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 25 Jun 2016) Joseph Merkle, 11 Apr 1901; from Mercer Deaths; from FHL microfilm 914954.

[8] 1910 U.S. Census, Liberty, Mercer, Ohio, ED 119, p.16B, dwelling, family, Luinsindy Merkle; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 26 Jun 2016); from FHL microfilm 1375227, from NARA microfilm T624, roll 1214.

Jun 24

Willshire Days Parade

Everyone loves a parade.

This weekend Willshire, Ohio, celebrates its annual Willshire Days festival. The weekend (Friday-Sunday) will be filled with all sorts of activities for everyone. This week’s Photo Star has over two pages devoted to the festival activities, their sponsors, and local businesses.

Personally, I am interested in the garage sales and perusing several of my favorite home decorating and antique shops. The stores are right in downtown Willshire and are worth a drive and a look-see any time of year!

One of the highlights of Willshire Days is their parade on Saturday afternoon, starting at 4:00.

A few weeks ago I ran across these old photos taken by my mom and dad. I could tell the photos were of a parade in Willshire but the year was not written on them. They look like they were from the late-60s or the 70s and I am guessing the parade may have been Willshire’s Sesquicentennial Parade in 1972 . Perhaps one of my readers can confirm that.

Whatever the occasion, it looks like Willshire had quite a nice parade that year.

Willshire Parade, Unknown date.

Willshire Parade, unknown date.

Willshire Parade, Unknown date.

Willshire Parade, unknown date.

Willshire Parade, Unknown date.

Willshire Parade, unknown date.

Willshire Parade, Unknown date.

Willshire Parade, unknown date.

Willshire Parade, Unknown date.

Willshire Parade, unknown date.

Willshire Parade, Unknown date.

Willshire Parade, unknown date.

Of course neighboring Chattanooga was  represented in the parade.

Chattanooga, Ohio, Fire Truck, Willshire Parade, Unknown date.

Chattanooga, Ohio, Fire Truck, Willshire Parade, unknown date.

Willshire Parade, Unknown date.

Willshire Parade, unknown date.

Willshire Parade, Unknown date.

Willshire Parade, unknown date.

Willshire Parade, Unknown date.

Willshire Parade, unknown date.

Willshire Parade, Unknown date.

Willshire Parade, unknown date.

In later years my dad often drove his Jeep in the Willshire Days Parade. I will write about that another time.

I encourage you to visit Willshire this weekend and join in on the festivities.

 

 

Jun 21

Tombstone Tuesday–Edna E. (Grauberger) Clase

Edna E. (Grauberger) Clase, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

Edna E. (Grauberger) Clase, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Edna E. (Grauberger) Clase, located in row 6 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

Edna E. Clase
Oct. 18 1913
Sep. 11, 1988

Edna Elizabeth Grauberger was born in Blackcreek Township, Mercer County, Ohio, on 18 October 1913, the third daughter of M. Henry and Emma (Baker) Grauberger.

Edma  was baptized at Zion Chatt by Rev. Reitz on 17 December 1913. Her aunt Elizabeth (Grauberger) Strabel was her baptismal sponsor. Edna was confirmed at Zion Chatt by Rev. J.E. Albrecht on Palm Sunday, 10 April 1927.

Edna Grauberger married Robert L. Clase on 13 March 1936 in Huntington, Indiana. Robert was a trucker who lived in Decatur, Indiana.  Robert was born 22 July 1912 in Pierceton, Indiana, the son of Samuel Harrison and Elizabeth “Lizzie” (Deitsch) Clase. His father Samuel Clase lived in Willshire in 1936 and his mother Lizzie (Deitsch) was from Chatt, the daughter of Jacob and Gertrude (Miller) Deitsch. [1]

In 1940 Robert, Edna, and their one-year old son Robert Allen lived in a rented home in Chatt. No occupation was given for Robert. Some of their neighbors included Lewis Wendel, Fred Wick, Christian Bollenbacher, Ivan Johnson, and Luther and John Fisher. [2]

By 1945 Robert and Edna had moved to Hamilton, Ohio, where Robert worked as a bartender and Edna as the restaurant manager at Garnett Hoskins. [3] They remained in Hamilton for at least another two years and lived at 518 Long Street in 1947, when Robert was employed as a trucker and Edna was a compiler at Las-Stick Manufacturing Company. [4]

Not long after that Robert and Edna divorced and Edna and her young son Robert Allen moved back to Chatt, where they lived in a brick duplex home across from the Chatt Bar, just north of Wendel’s Garage. Edna worked two jobs to support them– sanding wood at the Mersman Table Factory in Celina and tending bar at the Chatt Bar. Her family remembers her as a woman of incredible strength–a single, working mother, at a time and place where neither was common.

Later in her life Edna moved to New Carlisle, Indiana, where she died from complications of a duodenal ulcer on 11 September 1988. She died at the Hamilton Grove nursing home and was 74 years old. On her death certificate her occupation was given as an inspector at a furniture company. Her son, Robert Allen, of Edwardsburg, Michigan, was the informant for the information on her death certificate. Edna was buried on 14 September. [5]

Robert L and Edna (Grauberger) Clase had one son:
Robert Allen (1938-2008), married Nancy Elson

 

[1] “Indiana Marriages, 1811-2007,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 17 June 2016), Robert L Clase and Edna E Grauberger, 13 Mar 1936; from Huntington, Indiana, Marriages, Vol. 30, 1935-37, p. 49; from FHL microfilm 2295254.

[2] 1940 U.S. Census, Liberty, Mercer, Ohio, ED 54-22, p.14A, line 16, Robert Clase; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 19 Jun 2016); from NARA microfilm T627, roll 3114.

[3] Hamilton, Ohio, City Directory, 1945, p.137; database on-line, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 19 Jun 2016); from U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995.

[4] Hamilton, Ohio, City Directory, 1947, p.148; database on-line, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 19 Jun 2016); from U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995.

[5] Indiana, Death Certificates, 1899-2011, database on-line, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 19 Jun 2016); from Indiana State Board of Health Death Certificates, Indiana Archives and Records Administration, Indianapolis.

Jun 17

Painting

Painting. Not my favorite thing to do, but I can do it. No, not fancy painting. Not portraits, landscapes, still life, faux wall painting, or the popular chippy distressed furniture painting. Just basic painting.

This was my latest project just this past Wednesday. Something I have been wanting to do for some time.

Dry sink needing a make-over.

Dry sink needing a make-over.

We constructed this dry sink from a kit about 40 years ago. So is it considered “vintage” now? Maybe. Over four decades ago I painted the dry sink orange, antiqued it, and applied the decals. And there it has set, looking dreadful, until Wednesday. We were tired of the color and those outdated decals. I had wanted to try chalk paint for some time and this piece was going to be my beginner’s refurb paint project. After all, there wasn’t much else I could do to harm the appearance of this piece of furniture.

I used Miss Lillian’s NO-Wax Chock Paint in French Country. They told me at the store that this paint is very easy to apply and to be sure to use an old brush of poor quality. That didn’t sound too bad. I could do that. The label on the bottle described the paint as “Delicately textured & chock full of colorful goodness. No stripping, sanding, or waxing required!” Pretty simple, although I did do a little sanding before I applied the paint. The paint was thick but I still needed to apply two coats to cover the orange.

Dry sink after painting with

Dry sink after painting with Miss Lillian’s French Country No-Wax Chock Paint.

I think the dry sink turned out good although it is a little more pristine than I really wanted. Maybe it was that second coat of paint. Eventually I may sand some of the edges to give it a used/worn look. At least it has a new fresh look in a much softer color. The finish is softer, too, not shiny like the previous old polyurethane finish.

My grandma Schumm also liked painted furniture and she painted her share of tables and chairs over the years.

My mom did not care for painted furniture, probably because she grew up with it. Or, as someone once suggested, rich-looking, natural wood furniture was owned by the more well-to-do families while the families of modest means had painted furniture. I don’t know if that is true of not, but for whatever reason, when my mom acquired Grandma’s painted furniture she stripped all the paint off and brought them back to their natural wood finish.

My mom very much liked to refinish furniture. She actually refinished many pieces for me over the years. I would pick up old items at auction and she would make them look beautifully “new” again. She had a lot of patience for that and didn’t mind scraping off all that old varnish, sanding the wood, restaining it, and then putting a final finish back on.

Grandma had a nice drop-leaf table that she had painted green. I remember my mom telling me what a job it was to remove all that green paint, especially on the turned legs. It really is a beautiful wood table now.

Grandma's drop-leaf table refinished by my mom.

Grandma’s drop-leaf table refinished by my mom.

Grandma’s favorite paint color had to be green. It was the color she used most often although she did have some black chairs. She used several shades of green paint and I have two of her green benches.

One of Grandma's old painted benches.

One of Grandma’s old painted benches. Note the chippy paint!

I also have three of Grandma’s four old green table chairs. My mom tried to remove the green enamel paint from the fourth chair but that paint stripping process did not go well for her. The fourth chair, with its half-removed blistered paint, remains in a shed. The three chairs I have look good and I do not find the green paint objectionable at all.

One of Grandma Schumm's green chairs.

One of Grandma Schumm’s green chairs.

I guess I am a mixture of both my Mom and my Grandma. I like the beauty of wood but I also really like the look of painted furniture, especially pieces that have old chippy-paint. I will not paint over a piece of furniture with nice looking wood, but on the other hand, I will not strip the paint off a painted piece. I actually seek out painted pieces.

Or maybe I am just lazy! Either way saves me a lot of work!

For my next painting project I will be painting some walls.

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