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Jul 05

Tombstone Tuesday–Henry R. & Mary A. (Menche) Baker

Henry R. & Mary A. (Menche) Baker, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

Henry R. & Mary A. (Menche) Baker, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. (2011 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Henry R. and Mary A. (Menche) Baker, located in row 1 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Chattanooga, Mercer County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

Father   B   Mother

Henry R. Baker
1851-1914
Mary A. His Wife
1856-1915

BAKER

Reverse:
O, Let us think of all they said
And all the kind advice they gave
And let us do it, now they’re dead
And sleeping in their lovely grave.

Fortunately, Zion Chatt’s records give quite a bit of information about this couple, although this surname is rather challenging to research in the church records. The name seems to be spelled Becker in the older records while the more recent entries spell it Baker. But not always. I wrote a blog post about this on 26 June 2015, Becker or Baker.

Heinrich “Henry” Baker [spelled Becker in Zion Chatt’s Familienbuch]  was born 13 September 1851 in Piqua, Ohio, the seventh child of Johannes and Barbara Catharine (Wiedmann) Becker, which was also spelled Baker in later records. Henry’s father was born in the Kingdom of Bavaria and his mother was born in Wuerttemberg.

Zion Chatt’s records indicate that Henry “Becker” married Anna Maria Menche on 16 April 1874. The couple’s parents were given as Johann and Barbara Becker and John and Barbara Menche. Their marriage license and return indicates they were married in Van Wert County on 30 May 1874 by Rev. Schmidt. They applied for their marriage license on 13 April. [1]

Anna Maria Catharina “Mary” Menche [spelled Maenche in Zion Chatt’s Familienbuch and Manche in some other records; Manche seems to be the more recent spelling variation] was born 7 April 1856 in Hamilton, Butler County, Ohio, the first child born to Johannes “John” and Barbara (Hopf) Menche. Mary’s father was born in Hessen Darmstadt and her mother was born in the Kingdom of Bavaria. The John Menche family moved to the town of Willshire by 1860, where John was a shoemaker. According to the Zion’s Familienbuch Mary’s father John Menche died in 1865 while in the Army, after the end of the Civil War. He was Private John Manch/Manche, age 36, Co. B, 62nd OVI, who mustered out 24 September 1864 and died at Belle Isle POW camp in Richmond, Virginia, on 15 June 1865. John is now buried at Richmond National Cemetery, after being moved from Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond. [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] His widow Barbara filed for a widow’s pension 21 August 1865. [7]

After their marriage Henry and Mary (Menche) Baker lived in Blackcreek Township, Mercer County. Their household in 1880: Henry, 28, farm labor; Mary A, 24, wife; Theodore W, 4, son; Amelia B, 2, daughter; Lucy, 4 months, daughter. Daughter Lucy was born in February 1880. Also in the household was David Betsel, 16, hired labor, no relationship given; John Baker, 71, father, unemployed; and Barbra Baker, 68, mother. John and Barbra Baker were Henry’s parents and both were born in Bavaria. [8] 

The Henry Baker household in 1900: Henry, 48; Mary A, 44; Caroline J, 17; Anna C, 14; Clara, 9; Frederica, 6. This enumeration indicates that Mary had given birth to 7 children and all 7 were living. Henry farmed and all family members were born in Ohio. [9]

The Henry Baker household in 1910: Henry R, 56; Mary A, 54 (enumerated as Marry); Clara, 19 (enumerated as Clark); and Freda R, 16. Henry’s occupation was stock farmer and this document indicates they lived on State Line Road in Blackcreek Township. [10]

According to Zion Chatt’s records Henry Richard Baker died of tuberculosis on 19 November 1914 at the age of 63 years, 2 months, and 6 days. He was buried on the 22nd and Rev. Brobst was in charge of his funeral service. Henry was survived by his widow, 6 daughters, 1 son, and 12 grandchildren. Henry’s death certificate also indicates that he died of tuberculosis. It was signed by Chattanooga physician Charles Watkins and HB Cowan of Willshire was the undertaker. [11]

Mary Ann (Menche) Baker died of Bright’s disease on 21 April 1915 at the age of 59 years and 14 days. She was buried on the 23rd and was survived by her children and a brother and sister.

Henry & Mary (Manche) Baker. Children: Anna, Amelia, Lula, Theodore, Caroline, Clara, and Freda.

Henry & Mary (Manche) Baker. Children: Anna, Amelia, Lula, Theodore, Caroline, Clara, and Freda.

Henry and Mary (Menche) Baker had the following children:

William “Theodore” (1875-1932), married Mary Bolenbacher
“Amelia” Barbara Emilie (1877-1950), married John McGough
Maria Louise (1880-1964), married Birch L. Baumgardner
Ida “Caroline” (1882-bet 1950-64), married S.L. Evans
Anna Catharina (1885-aft 1964), married Louis S Egger
Clara (1890-bet 1950-64), married Leo Merkle
Friederike “Frieda” (1893-aft 1964), married Sam Egger

One of Zion Chatt’s large stained glass windows was given in memory of Henry and Mary Baker by their children. It is the beautiful south window which depicts an angel reporting Christ’s birth to the shepherds. Below the window, in the stained glass: In Memory of Father and Mother, Henry and Mary Baker. Henry and Mary passed away a couple years before the current church was built in 1916.

Zion's south window, given in honor of Henry and Mary Baker. (2011 photo by Karen)

Zion’s south window, given in honor of Henry and Mary Baker. (2011 photo by Karen)

Dedication below Zion's south window. (2011 photo by Karen)

Dedication below Zion’s south window. (2011 photo by Karen)

[1] “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 4 Jul 2016), Henry Baker and Mary Menche, 30 May 1874; from Van Wert Marriages, Vol. 4, p.229; from FHL microfilm 1015860.

[2] U.S. Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865, National Park Service, Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System, from film M552, roll 67;database online,  Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 Jul 2016), John Manche.

[3] U.S, Burial Registers, Military Posts, and National Cemeteries, 1862-1960; database on-line, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 Jul 2016); from  records of the Department of Veterans Affairs, 1773-2007, The National Cemetery Administration, Washington, D.C., NARA Record Group 15.

[4] U.S, Burial Registers, Military Posts, and National Cemeteries, 1862-1960; database on-line, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 Jul 2016); from  records of the Department of Veterans Affairs, 1773-2007, The National Cemetery Administration, Washington, D.C.,  NARA Record Group 15, and Department of the Army, Office of Quartermaster General, Burial Registers of Military Post and National Cemeteries, c1862-c1960, Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General, 1774-1985, NARA Record Group 92.

[5] U.S. Burial Registers, Military Posts and National Cemeteries, 1862-1960, database on-line, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 Jul 2016); from Burial Registers, compiled 1867-2006, documenting 1831-2006, The National Cemetery Administration, Washington, D.C., NARA record Group 15.

[6] National Cemetery Interment Control Forms, 1928-1962, database on-line, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 Jul 2016); from Interment Control Forms, A1 2110-B, Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General, 1774-1985, National Archives at College Park, Maryland, Record Group 92.

[7] U.S. Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934, database on-line, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 Jul 2016); database on-line, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 Jul 2016); from General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934, NARA microfilm T288.

[8] 1880 U.S. Census, Black Creek, Mercer, Ohio, ED 179, p.323B, dwelling & family 2, Henry Baker; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 3 Jul 2016); from FHL microfilm 1255048, from NARA microfilm T9, roll 1048.

[9] 1900 U.S. Census, Black Creek, Mercer, Ohio, ED 74, p.9B, dwelling & family 195, Henry Baker; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 3 Jul 2016); from FHL microfilm 1241303, from NARA microfilm T623, roll 1303.

[10] 1910 U.S. Census, Black Creek, Mercer, Ohio, ED 107, p.1B, dwelling & family 15, Henry R Bakes; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 3 Jul 2016); from FHL microfilm 1375227, from NARA microfilm T624, roll 1214.

[11] “Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 4 Jul 2016), Henry Richard Baker, 19 Nov 1914; from Black Creek, Mercer, Ohio, file no. 62079; from FHL microfilm 1983285.

2 comments

  1. Martha Lawler

    Karen,
    I really enjoy all the information you are presenting about the people buried in Zion cemetery. As you list the children I find many names of people that I knew when I was around there as a child. Last week, all that Doug Roebuck wrote was interesting as some of those people were my relatives. Keep up the good work
    Martha Lawler

    1. Karen

      Thank you Martha! I am so glad others find it as interesting as I do. I also find the Civil War connections interesting. As I researched the Bakers I learned how horrific the conditions were at Belle Isle and what John Manche (Mary Baker’s father) probably went through before he died. Thanks for writing!

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