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May 30

Private Hallot Bryan in the Civil War

Hallot Bryan, son of Peter and Mary (Huey) Bryan, was born about 1836 in Fairfield County, Ohio. After moving several times the family settled down in Jay County, Indiana, where Hallot maintained the family farm after his father passed away in 1854. Hallot was the brother of my great-great-great-grandfather John Bryan, the paternal side of my family.

The Civil War began in 1861 and Hallot enlisted about 16 months later, on 13 August 1862. He was a private in Company E of the 89th Indiana Infantry Regiment, which consisted of many men from Jay County. He enlisted at Portland for a term of 3 years and  bounty pay of $27 and was in Captain Joseph P. Winters Company. Hallot gave his residence Westchester, Indiana, which was an unincorporated community in Bearcreek Township, located southeast of Bryant.

According to his military service record, Private Bryan was 27 years old, 5 feet 8 inches tall, with a fair complexion, dark eyes and dark hair. The record indicates he was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, and that he was a farmer. [1]

The 89th Indiana Infantry was organized at Indianapolis and Wabash and mustered in at Indianapolis on 28 August 1862. The 89th went first to Louisville and then to Munfordville, Kentucky. They were soon engaged in battle. [2]

Civil War re-enactment, Celina, Ohio. (2000 photo by Karen)

Civil War re-enactment, Celina, Ohio. (2000 photo by Karen)

The regiment was sent to Munfordville to reinforce the Federal garrison, but it became the Battle of Munfordville. The 89th Indiana Infantry, along with several other Indiana and Kentucky regiments, fought from 14-17 September 1862.

Munfordville was an important transportation center north of the Green River, in central Kentucky. It was near a Louisville & Nashville Railroad bridge that crossed the Green River. The battle resulted in a Confederate victory when the Union troops surrendered to General Braxton Bragg on 17 September. The Union troops were paroled the same day.

Civil War re-enactment, Celina, Ohio. (2000 photo by Karen)

Civil War re-enactment, Celina, Ohio. (2000 photo by Karen)

An historical roadside marker near the battle site reads: BATTLE OF MUNFORDVILLE. Union forces commanded by Col. Wilder surrendered to Mississippi regiments of Gen. Bragg’s army on September 17, 1862, following battle on the 14th. 50 killed and 307 wounded. Bragg evacuated Munfordville on 20th before Gen. Buell’s forces arrived. Confederates destroyed railroad bridge. Site of Fort Craig and monument of Col. R. A. Smith 1500 ft. west. [3] [4]

The 89th Regiment returned home for about six weeks after their parole.  [2] Private Bryan was present for muster from 31 October 1862 through August 1863. [1]

Civil War re-enactment, Celina, Ohio. (2000 photo by Karen)

Civil War re-enactment, Celina, Ohio. (2000 photo by Karen)

The 89th was on guard and picket duty at Fort Pickering, south of Memphis, from 4 December 1862-16 August 1863. [5] It was during this time that Private Hallot Bryan became ill.

Hallot became ill sometime during the summer of 1863, stricken with one of the most common and deadly afflictions during the Civil War–dysentery. Dysentery was the number one killer during the Civil War, taking the lives of more soldiers than battle wounds. Unsanitary water, other unsanitary conditions, poor diet, poor hygiene, and overcrowded living conditions were the main causes of the condition. Dysentery was more prevalent during the months of July and August.

Private Bryan died 13 September 1863 at Jefferson Hospital in Memphis. His service record indicates that he died from chronic diarrhea.

Private Hallot Bryan was buried in Section 4, Plot 315 at the Old National Cemetery at Fort Pickering. [6]

Burial Ledger, Old National Cemetery, Fort Pickering. Hallot Bryan, #3679, line 39.

Burial Ledger, Old National Cemetery, Fort Pickering. Hallot Bryan, #3679, line 39.

At some point Hallot’s remains were removed from the Old National Cemetery and he was interred at Memphis National Cemetery, in Section C, Site 2740. The card below includes information taken from the oldest burial register. It bears the Columbus Marble Works stamp, dated 27 Oct 1976, likely indicating when his current military marker was placed. [7]

Hallot Bryan Interment Card, Memphis National Cemetery.

Hallot Bryan Interment Card, Memphis National Cemetery.

Memphis National Cemetery is located on the northeast side of the city and was originally a Union burial ground called Mississippi River National Cemetery. After the Civil War, burials there included re-interments from area camps and hospitals, which included Hallot.

Memphis National Cemetery Ledger Book, Hallot Bryan, p. 64, line 29; buried in Section C, Site 2740.

Memphis National Cemetery Ledger Book, Hallot Bryan, p. 64, line 29; buried in Section C, Site 2740.

There are 36,065 interments at Memphis National Cemetery. It has the second largest number of unknown burials in a national cemetery. Memphis National Cemetery is also the burial place for the victims of the USS Sultana, which exploded on 23 April 1865. Many of the unknown burials are from the Sultana. [8]

Memphis National Cemetery. (2014 photo, submitted)

Memphis National Cemetery. (2014 photo, submitted)

The 89th Indiana Infantry Regiment started with 994 men and added 124 recruits, for a total of 1,118 men. Eventually 242 died, 24 deserted, and 8 were unaccounted for. [2]

Hallot Bryan's military marker, Memphis National Cemetery. (2014 photo, submitted)

Hallot Bryan’s military marker, Memphis National Cemetery. (2014 photo, submitted)

I have heard that someone in the family has a Civil War rifle and that they do not know who it blonged to. Perhaps it was Private hallot Bryan’s rifle. I would love to see it some day.

 

[1] Compiled Service Record, Hallot Bryan, Pvt., Co. E, 89th Indiana Infantry; Record Group 94, National Archives, Washington, DC.

[2] Civil War Index, http://www.civilwarindex.com/armyin/89th_in_infantry.html; original information from The Union Army, Vol. 3 Federal Publishing Company, 1908.

[3] The Battle of Munfordville, http://www.battleforthebridge.org/Munfordville.html

[4] Civil War Trust, http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/munfordville.html

[5] 89th Indiana Infantry Regiment, Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/89th_Indiana_Infantry_Regiment

[6] Burial Ledger, Old National Cemetery, Fort Pickering, Hallot Bryan, # 3679, line 39, no page, buried in Section 4, Plot 315; Burial Registers, Military Posts and National Cemeteries, 1862-1960, database on-line, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 May 2014); from Burial Ledgers, The National Cemetery Administration, Washington D.C. (Original records transferred to NARA: Burial Registers, compiled 1867-2006, documenting the period 1831-2006, ARC ID: 5928352; Records of the Department of Veterans Affairs, 1773–2007, Record Group 15, NARA, Washington D.C.; Department of Defense, Department of the Army, Office of the Quartermaster General (09/18/1947–08/01/1962); Burial Registers of Military Post and National Cemeteries, compiled ca. 1862–ca. 1960, ARC ID: 4478151, Series A1 627, Record Group Title: Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General, 1774-1985, Record Group No. 92, NARA, Washington D.C.

[7] Hallot Bryan, Record of Interment, DA Form 2122, dated 27 Oct 1976, U.S. National Cemetery Interment Control Forms, 1928-1962, database on-line, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 May 2014); original data from Interment Control Forms, 1928–1962; Interment Control Forms, A1 2110-B; Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General, 1774–1985, Record Group 92, National Archives at College Park, College Park, Maryland. Note: This card includes information taken from the oldest burial register. It bears the Columbus Marble Works stamp, dated 27 Oct 1976, most likely indicating when the current marker was placed.

[8] Memphis, National Cemetery, National Cemetery Administration, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, http://www.cem.va.gov/cems/nchp/memphis.asp.

Other sources of information:

U.S. Veterans Gravesites, ca.1775-2006, National Cemetery Administration, database on-line, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 May 2014); original data from Nationwide Gravesite Locator, National Cemetery Administration. Note: this contains a compilation of burial records from a variety of sources & cemeteries.

Memphis National Cemetery, Burial Ledger, c.1810-1965, p. 64, line 29, Bryan, Hallot, The National Cemetery Administration; database on-line, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 May 2014); original data from Burial Ledgers of The National Cemetery Administration, Washington, D.C. (original records transferred to NARA: Burial Registers, compiled 1867-2006, documenting the period 1831-2006. ARC ID: 5928352; Records of the Department of Veterans Affairs, 1773–2007, Record Group 15. National Archives at Washington, D.C. 2; Department of Defense. Department of the Army. Office of the Quartermaster General. (09/18/1947–08/01/1962); Burial Registers of Military Post and National Cemeteries, compiled ca. 1862–ca. 1960. ARC ID: 4478151; Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General, 1774–1985, Record Group 92; National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C. Note: This ledger indicates that Hallot Bryan was originally buried in Section 4, No. 315, the Old National Cemetery, Fort Pickering, Memphis.

U.S. Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865, National Park Service, database on-line, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 May 2014); from National Park Service, Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System,  http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/, acquired 2007.

 

 

 

 

2 comments

  1. Mary Goodwin Haddad

    Thanks, Karen, for all your work and writing of this interesting story. I find it hard to read stories about the Civil War since we were all Americans killing each other. How terrible. Yes, if I were you I would track down that rifle and check it out.

    1. Karen

      Thank you! Yes, it would be so interesting to see the rifle.

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