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Jun 25

Tombstone Tuesday–Nicholas Hoehamer

Nicholas Hoehamer, Mount Hope Cemetery, Adams County, Indiana. (2013 photo by Karen)

Nicholas Hoehamer, Mount Hope Cemetery, Adams County, Indiana. (2013 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of Nicholas Hoehamer, located in Mount Hope Cemetery, Jefferson Township, Adams County, Indiana. The marker is inscribed:

Nicholas
Hoehamer
1845-1914

Last week I wrote about William and Barbara (Hoehamer) Allmandinger. They attended Zion Lutheran Chatt and later Zion Lutheran Schumm and information about the couple was in the records of both churches. The Allmandingers and Hoehamers were originally from the Chattanooga area and the Zion Chatt records include information about their parents as well. Nicholas Hoehamer was Barbara (Hoehamer) Allmandinger’s father.

The Hoehamers lived close to Chattanooga, just across the state line in Adams County, Indiana. They were once members of Zion Chatt and several of their children were baptized and confirmed at Zion. There were several Hoehamer burial services recorded at Zion Chatt with the burials at Mount Hope Cemetery. The Hoehammers were first listed in Zion Chatt’s membership/communion records in 1882. Senior, Mrs., Nicholas, George and Katharina Hoehamer took communion in 1882.

Willard "Mount Hope" Cemetery, Adams County, Indiana.

Willard “Mount Hope” Cemetery, Adams County, Indiana.

Joe and I took a little road trip last week to visit Mount Hope Cemetery. It is just a few miles northwest of Chatt, probably near the area in which the Hoehamers lived. Mount Hope Church of the Nazarene is just east of the cemetery and I noticed many familiar names in the cemetery, including some of my Brewster relatives. It appears that at least eleven Hoehamers are buried there, including Nicholas, his parents, two of his wives, some of his children and a couple infant Hoehamers. Some of their tombstones were very difficult to read and Nicholas’ tombstone was obstructed by a yucca plant.

Nicholas V. Hoehamer was born 12 October 1845 to George F. and Barbara (Straus) Hoehamer in Springfield, Clark County, Ohio. His parents were from Germany. [1]

Nicholas married three times. He first married Anna S. “Manzelman” on 4 January 1870 in Auglaize County, Ohio. [2] From church and cemetery records I determined they had the following children, and possibly more:

Johann Georg (1870-?) confirmed at Zion in 1886; married Attie Bergman
Henry A. (1872-1878) buried at Mount Hope
Jacob Wilhelm (1873-1899)
William A. (1875-1956) married Elisabeth Margaret Kallenberger [daughter of Andreas]
Sophie Barbara (1877-1929) married William Allmandinger
John C. (1880-1881) buried at Mount Hope

Anna S. (Manzelman) Hoehamer died 4 November 1880 at the age of 28 years, 5 months and 1 day. She is buried next to Nicholas at Mount Hope Cemetery.

Nicholas’ second marriage was to Fredericka (Kniesel)  Pfeifer. Nicholas and Fredericka were married 26 September 1882 in Auglaize County, Ohio. [3] According to Zion Chatt’s records Fredericka was born 6 September 1845 in Eberndorf, Waiblingen,Württemberg. Fredericka had been married before and had at least one son, Friedrich L. Pfeifer. He was was born 19 December 1875 and was confirmed at Zion Chatt in 1890 with Wilhelm A. Hoehamer. It appears that Nicholas and Friederike had at least two children of their own:

Carl Philipp (1886-?)
Johann Edward (1889-1889)

Fredericka (Kniesel) Hoehamer died 5 March 1896, aged 50 years and 5 months. Her death is recorded in Zion’s records. She is buried in the row west of Nicholas Hoehamer’s grave site, close to his grave, but her tombstone has fallen over.

Nicholas Hoehamer marriage to Delia Warner, Auglaize County, Ohio, 1899.

Nicholas Hoehamer marriage to Delia Warner, Auglaize County, Ohio, Vol. 8:87, 1899.

Nicholas married a third time, to Delia (Wells) Warner on 26 October 1899 at St. Paul Church, Wapakoneta, Auglaize County, Ohio. Nicholas was age 54 and was a farmer residing in Adams County, Indiana. Delia was 38 years old, born 29 September 1861 to Joseph and Arvilla (“Waisner”) Wells, in Mercer County, Ohio. She was residing in Santa Fe, Auglaize County, at the time of their marriage. Delia had been married once before and was divorced. [1]

According to the 1910 census Nicholas and Deliah were living in Blackford County, Indiana. It appears Nicholas and Deliah had a son, Orvile, born about 1901. [4]

 

[1] “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-1994,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XD2T-P19  : accessed 23 June 2013), Nicholas Hoehamer and Delia Wells Warner, 1899, citing Vol. 8, p.87.

[2] “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-1994,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XZKS-5PX : accessed 23 June 2013), Nicolas Hoechamer and Anna Manzelman, 1870.

[3] “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-1994,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XZNB-GHQ : accessed 23 June 2013), Nicholas V. Hohamer and Fredericka Pfeifer, 1882, citing Vol. 5, p.250.

[4] 1910 US Census, Hartford Ward 1, Blackford, Indiana, ED 9, p. 14B, line 94, dwelling 335, family 338, Nichola V. Hoehamier; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 23 June 2013); FHL microfilm 1374353, from National Archives microfilm T624, roll 340.

 

 

4 comments

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  1. Waldo

    Thank you for making the connection so clear by listing Great Aunt Elizabeth as the wife of William. Again the connection of proximity (location, location, location) in the marriage of so many of our family members. With the local church, regional farm ethic and just plain opportunity to bump into each other, the connection seems abundantly clear, not to mention strong. 3 miles seems a very small circle, but considering that there was a school and a church nearly every mile or so in thos days, it makes more and more sense.

    1. Karen

      You are welcome! It is so interesting to see how families are connected. I’m glad I could show the connection.

  2. Nick Hoehamer

    that was pretty interesting to read. thank you for writing that

    1. Karen

      Thank you! I’m glad you enjoyed it.

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