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Dec 03

Tombstone Tuesday–George M. Schumm

George M. Schumm, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm, Van Wert County, Ohio. (2012 photo by Karen)

George M. Schumm, Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm, Van Wert County, Ohio. (2012 photo by Karen)

This is the tombstone of George Martin Schumm, located in row 6 of Zion Lutheran Cemetery, Schumm, Van Wert County, Ohio. The marker is inscribed:

Hier ruhet in Gott
George M. Schumm
Gestorben
Den 4 Juni 1871
Im Alter von
58 Jahr 6 mo. 24 Tage

Translation: Here rests in God, George M. Schumm, died 4 June 1871, aged 58 years, 6 months, 24 days.

George Martin Schumm was the fourth child born to Johann Georg and Anna Maria (Fisher) Schumm. He was born in Ruppertshofen, Württemberg, on 11 Nov 1812, as calculated from his tombstone. He came to America with his father, sister, and three brothers in 1833.

Church records at Zion Lutheran Schumm, indicate that he and his family resided in Holmes County, Ohio, for 5 years before moving to Van Wert County. While in Holmes County he married Maria Pflüger on 1 May 1838 [1] and the couple moved to Schumm on 7 June 1838. George Martin died near Schumm on 4 Jun 1871 of a nervous disorder and his wife Maria died 25 March 1903 in Van Wert County.

On 26 April 1837 George Martin applied for a land patent at the US Federal Land Office in Lima, Ohio, for the southeast quarter of Section 22 in Willshire Township, Van Wert County, consisting of 160 acres. [2] On 10 March 1840 he sold his 160 acre tract of land to his brother Lewis for $200. [3] George Martin purchased the northeast quarter of Section 27 from his father for $200 on the same day. [4] On 10 Jan 1842 George and his wife deeded ½ acre of section 27 to the “Dütch Lutheran Church” [Zion Schumm] for $5. [5] A log church was built on this site in about 1840. The railroad also had right of way through George Martin’s property.

In 1839 George Martin Schumm was enumerated as a white male inhabitant of Willshire Township, enumerated by assessor William Parent. [6] He was enumerated in the 1840 census in Willshire Township and his household consisted of a female 20-30 years old and a male child less than 5 years of age. [7] George Martin was naturalized 2 October 1843 in Van Wert County, witnessed by Henry Reichard and Thomas R. Kear. [8] In 1882 George Martin’s son Henry G. Schumm was living on the family homestead. [9]

George Martin Schumm (1812-1871)

George Martin Schumm (1812-1871)

Maria Pflueger Schumm (1820-1903)

Maria Pflueger Schumm (1820-1903)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George Martin Schumm and Maria Pflüger had the following children:

J. Frederick (1839-1927), married Maria Germann
Louis (1840-?), married Mina Domke.
George, Rev. (1841-1917), married Amalia Justine Markworth 1867; married Charlotte Breuninger 1875.
John (1843-1864)
Anna “Rosina” (1845-1928) married Johann Roehm 1870.
Margaretha Barbara (1847-1851).
Marie (1849-?), married Claus Peters 1871.
George “Jacob” (1851-1895) married Lena Kellerman; married Amalia Backhaus 1880.
George “Christian” (1852-?).
George Henry “H. G.” (1854-1939), married Anna Roehm 1879; later married Wilhelmina Kroemer.
Jacob Wilhelm “Will” (1857-1858).
Jacob “Martin” (1859-1909), married Elizabeth Ehrenmann 1882.
Anna Magdelina Sophia (1862-?).

Their son John Schumm (1843-1864) died while imprisoned in a Confederate prison in Salisbury, North Carolina during the Civil War. John joined the 60th OVI, Company A, on 27 February 1864 as a private and was later appointed to Corporal. [10] Family history says that he was wounded and captured while fighting in the Battle of Petersburg, Virginia. He is presumed buried in one of the trench graves at Salisbury.

George Martin Schumm’s is buried in the same row as his brothers Friedrich and Ludwig. There is a flagstaff by George Martin’s tombstone, but he was not in any American war to my knowledge.

 

[1] “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-1994,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XDP1-PT5 : accessed 24 Nov 2013), George Schumm and Mary Pfluger, 01 May 1838; citing Vol. 2 1831-1867, p. 44, Holmes, Ohio, United States, reference 272; FHL microfilm 477144.

[2] U.S. Bureau of Land Management, “Patent Search,” database, General Land Office Records (http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/search/default.aspx : accessed 1 December 2013), entry for George  Schumm, Lima office, doc. no. 9727.

[3] Van Wert County Deeds, Recorder’s Office, courthouse, Van Wert, Ohio, Vol. E: 283.

[4] Van Wert Deeds, Recorder’s Office, courthouse, Van Wert, Ohio, Vol. E: 282.

[5] Van Wert Deeds, Recorder’s Office, courthouse, Van Wert, Ohio, Vol. N: 208.

[6] History of Van Wert and Mercer Counties, Ohio (1882; reprint, Mt. Vernon, Indiana : Windmill Publications, Inc. , 1991), 141.

[7] 1840 U.S. Census, Willshire, Van Wert, Ohio, p. 69, line 27, George Schumm; digital image by subscription, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 1 December 2013); from FHL microfilm 0020178, from National Archives microfilm M704, roll 431.

[8] Van Wert County Common Pleas Court, Journal A:160.

 [9] History of Van Wert and Mercer Counties, Ohio (1882; reprint, Mt. Vernon, Indiana : Windmill Publications, Inc. , 1991), 257.

1 comment

  1. Waldo

    Ironic that women used to live so much longer than men, at least in some cases. We have discussed the fact that so many young woman died having children, thus resulting in men re-marrying, sometimes even several times (clearly true for several Miller and Kallenberger men). Yet, here is a lady who had a big family (many children) and still lived 20 years longer than her husband. Indeed the same was true of my great grandparents on my father’s side. Even today (though less so than even a few years ago) any nursing home resident list will easily show that old women far out number old men. Why? Genetics? Stress (work pressures from supporting a family)? Behavior (smoking, drinking)? Chance (there are examples of the opposite)?

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